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erkum-fü’xil or sér-kum circumnavigate the globe. 'Haring cis. En, round, and fusilis, cumnavigated the whole earth' Fulier of being poured or spread Circumnavigation (sér - kum-bay'i-ptile gold' Pope. shon), 1. The act of sailing round; as, the it-kum-fü’zhon), #. The circumnavigation of the globe. ng, that is, of pouring or circumnavigator (sèr-kumu-navi-ga-ter), A the state of being poured One who circumnavigates or sails round:

generally applied to one who has metal (sérkum-jes-tá"shon), n. round the globe; as, he was one of the eart) and gestatio, a carrying. circumnavigators. TE! A carrying about. Circumplexion 1 (sér-kum-plek'sbon) * of the eucharist. Jer. (L. circum, round, and plecto

, to bend,

turn.) 1. A folding around. – ? The things ir kum-ji'rat), v.t. and i folded or twined around; a girdle. and gyro, to turn round, +] To roll or turn round.

It was after his fall that he (nan) made batera treumgyrated, and com

fig-leaf circumpletion Ray

3. An entangling circumstance; a compliaser-kun'ji-ri"shon), n. tion. 'Circumplexions and environments' Ligyrating, or rolling or Holland.

Circumplication (sér-kuzr’yli-ki”sboa, are said to delight in move (L. circumplico-circum, round, and plicu

, to Howvell.

fold.) A folding, winding, or wrapping cum-jir), 0.1 To circum round; or a state of being in wrapped

Bailey. (Rare.) after wo miles arcumgyring. Circumpolar (sér-kum-põler), 2. Il esdarges itself into the ocean. Sem T. Herbert

cum, round, and E polur. 'Surrounding (sér-kum'in-se"shon), 11.

either pole of the earth or heavens -[i. in incessus, a walking.)

cumpolar stars, those which revolve round rocal existence in each

the pole without setting. Hersons in the Godhead.

Circumposition (sér-kum'pő-zi”ehran), 4 kum-i'ahun), 14. [L. eir.

(L. circum, round, and positio, a pattinen rum circum, round, and

placing, from pono, positus, to place.) The uing) A going round.

act of placing round about; the stated

being so placed. Evelyn; Boyle cumjacency (sér-kum- Circumrasion ! (ser-kum-r'zhon )

, a(L en-si), 1. State or con.

circumrasio-circum,round, and rado, ratsu, imjacent

to shave.) The act of shaving or paring sum-jä'sent), a. (L. cir.

round. Bailey. (Rare.] i round, and jaceo, to

Circumrotary, Circumrotatory(sérkanordering on every side.

ro'ta-ri, sér-kum-ro'ta-to-ri), 4. Tumiur.

rolling, or whirling round. Circunrelatory eadful havoc on the circum

flourishes.' Shenstone. Drummond.

Circumrotate (sér-kum-rõ'tāt), e... Tonu im-jo'vi-al), 7h. [L. cir.

tate or revolve around. (Rare.) uvialis, from Jupiter. Circumrotation (sér kum-rô-táľshen), * of the planet Jupiter's (L. circum, round, and rotatio, Matice, Derham

from roto, to turn round.) 1. The act d T-kum'li-ga" shon), m.

rolling or revolving round, as a wheel; dir bind round-circum,

cumvolution; the state of being whirle! id.] 1. The act of bind

round.—2 A single revolution of a rotatory ond with which any.

body. Johnson Bailey. (Rare in both circumsall (sėrkum-sál), 6. t. 1L circut,

round, and È. sail.) To sail round; to er -kum-lit'to-ral), a. cumnavigate d litoralis, of or per: Warner (Rare.) ore, from litus (liitus) Circumscissile (sėr-kum-sis'sil or ser-kun

1. About or adjoining 5-2 A term applieu Co which some naturze sea-bottom in acth of water covering Hepth the circumlit

, reckoning from the kum'lo-kū"shon), The

manner.

2. An unessen Circumscription (sér-kum-skrip'shon), n.

collectively, 1.1 A writing around; a circular inscription.

cution. Witi Ashmole. — 2. The act of circumscribing or state of being circumscribed ; the act of deny this cha:

unless in coll bounding, settling, or defining; limitation;

With all circu restraint; confinement; as, the circumscription of arbitrary power.

The circumscrip

first set foot upo

To use too ma tions of terrestrial nature.' Johnson.

the matter is we I would not my unhoused, free condition Put into circumscription and confine. Shak.

3. A ceremo 3. The exterior line which determines the specifically, i form or magnitude of a body; periphery; of pomp and as, the circumscription of a leaf.

mony, Circumscriptive (sėr-kum-skrip'tiv), a. cumstance of 1. Circumscribing or tending to circum Situation; su scribe; bringing under certain limits or li especially, cc mitations. Milton.—2. Forming or coinci estate. dent with the superficies of a body. N. We ought not Greu. [Rare.)

inhabitants in ar Circumscriptively (sér-kum-skrip'tiv-li),

have human na

stances of our w adv. In a circumscriptive or limited manner. [Rare.)

When men at

are naturally en The nature of a soul is not to be circumscriptively in place,

Montagu. -Event Occu Circumscriptly (sèr'kum-skript-li), adv.

See under Ev Narrowly; in a slavishly literal sense. (Rare.]

Circumstanc These words taken circumscriptly

pp. circumst

... are just as much against plain equity and the mercy of religion,

1. To place in as these words of Take, cat, this is my body,' ele.

dition.-2. TC mentally understood, are against nature and sense.

cidents. (Ra Milton.

The poet too Circumseated (ser'kum-sēt-ed), p. and a. down to him, ail

(L. circum, round, and E, seated.] Seated round. Clifton. (Rare.]

Circumstanc Circumseptt (ser'kum-sept), v.t. (L.circum, Placed in a

round, and sepio, septus, to hedge in, from sepes, a hedge.) To hedge round. Hall.

to attending

stanced as w Circumspect (sér'kum-spekt), a. (L. circumspectus - circum, round, and specio, to

[Shakspere ha look.) Lit. looking on all sides; looking

cumstanced a

of I must put round; hence, examining carefully all the iii. 4, 201.] circumstances that may affect a determination; watchful on all sides; wary.

Circumstant

His cautious and circumspect demeanour upon

ing. ‘All circ the bench.' Brougham.

Circumstant

a. Capable o High-reaching Buckingham grows circumspect. Taylor.

Shak. Cautious, Prudent, Careful, Wary, Cir.

Circumstant cumspect, Discreet.

1. Attending See under CAUTIOUS. Circumspect (sérkum-spekt), v.t. To ex

to, but not es anine carefully; to scrutinize. To circum

All that is mc

dinated to and spect and note daily all defects.' Newcourt. [Rare.)

2. Consisting Circumspection (sér-kum-spek'shon), n.

stances or to Attention to all the facts and circumstances The usual che of a case, and to the natural or probable

stantial truth ur consequences of a measure, with a view to 3. Aboundin a correct course of conduct or to avoid danger; observation of the true position of cir.

stances; exh cumstances; watchfulness; wariness: cau

minute; part

count or reci tion. 'Sly circumspection.' Milton. Rarely evidence the followed by a phrase introduced by way of expressing the object of attention.

stances, whic

Cau facts of a p tious circumspection of surrounding connec arises presun tions.' Brougham. - Syn. Caution, watch resorted to in fulness, deliberation, thoughtfulness, wari. not be obtain ness, forecast.

Circumstan Circumspectious t (sér-kum-spek'shus), a. Something i Circumspect; vigilant; wary. Earl of Monmouth,

importance:

Who would Circumspective (sér-kum-spek’tiv),a. Look his own in the ing round every way; cautious; careful of fers from it in t consequences; watchful of danger. Sly, Circumstant slow things, with circumspective eyes.'Pope. ti), n. Theo (Rare.)

minuteness; Circumspectively (sér-kum-spek'tiv-li), cumstantiali adv. In a circumspective manner.

Foxe. Circumstant [Rare.)

adv. 1. In Circumspectly (sér kum-spekt-li), adv. In

essentially; a circumspect manner; cautiously; watch

of the fancy fully.

cumstantially Then judge yourself and prove your man, As circumspectly as you can. Cowper.

2. Minutely;

stance or pa Circumspectness (sér'kum-spekt-nes), n. what circum.

The quality of being circumspect; caution; but the mani circumspection; prudence.

Circumstant Circumstance (sér kum-stans), n. [L. cir 1. To place i cumstantia, from circumstans, standing invest with p about-circum, around, and sto, to stand.)

(Rare.] 1. Something attending, appendant, or rela

If the act tive to a fact or case; something which, though not essential to an action, in some

2. To place way affects it; something incidental; often

regard to po some fact giving rise to a certain presumption, or tending to afford some evidence; as,

stantiated are the circumstances of time, place, and persons are to be considered. 'Hath not essentially but by circumstance the name of val. onr. Shak. Inward essence and outward circumstances.' Dr. Caird. If circumstances lead me, I will find where truth is

Shak. hid.

The poet has gathered those circumstances which most terrify the imagination. ch, chain;

8, go;

Circumsailed the earth.'

-id the use of a single

Swift

sis'sil), a. (L cracia scindo, to cut round) In bot opening of divided by a trans verse circular line: 1 term applied to s pode of dehiscence

in some fruits, as in m, round, and locum

the pimpernel (118to speak.) A round

gallis arrensis: &e ; a periphrasis; the

cut), henbane, and is to express an idea

monkey. pot, the not at hand or when

fruit in such cases Circumscissile De

being called a pyrihiscence.

dium. lingsgate way of calling

Circumscribable abundance of time, lost

(sér-kum-skrib'a-bl), a. Capable of being cir

cumscribed. KumTo-kū"shon-al),

Circumscribe (sèrókum-skrib), el. pret, & rcumlocution; cir

pp. circumscribed; ppr. circumscribing. (L circumscribo-circun, round, and scribe

, to kumolồ - kusho

write.] 1. To write or inscribe around circumlocution; a

Ashmole. (Rare.).—2 To mark out certain ases. Gent. Mag.

bounds or limits for; to inclose within carm- lok'ü-to-ri), a.

tain límits; to limit, bound, confine, restrain.

'From where he circumscribed with his con; periphrastic,

sword, and brought to yoke the enemies of -cutory manner of

Rome.' Shak. Circumscribed by the sane a Martinus Scrib

laws of decorum.' Burke. "To circumscribe am'me-rid"i-an), a. royal power.' Bancroft

. meridian (which

Is England his authority, though great. was car around the meri

cumscribed by ancient and noble laws which ciet

the Tories would not patiently have seen him miringa ur'), v.t. (L. cir. 3 wall.] To wall 2 wall.

certain points without cutting: the cu.

verse of inscribe (which see); as, to circutka od with brick, Shak.

&cribe a circle to a polygon. m-navi-ga-bl), a. Circumscribed (sérkum-skribd)

, p. and a uvigated or sailed zen proved to be

distinct from the surrounding parts 7- nav'i-gát), v.t. Circumscriber (sér-kum-skribér), 1. Ove 1; ppr.circumna. aris, a ship.) To by water; as

might will that

3. In geom. to draw found so as to touch at

A number in

Specifically, in pathol. a term applied to tumours whose bases are well defined sud

3. To confirn circumstanti

Neither will particulars. Circumstan Circumstant cumstances.

Addison.

h, Fr. ton;

j, job;

ch, Sc. loch;

who or that which circumscribes. cireum, round, Circumscriptible ? (sér-kum-skripta-m,

Capable of being circumscribed or limited by bounds. Bullotar.

, tub, bull

478

CISTERN

at climbs. - 2. In zool. a soft same genus with the true vine, but having ary appendage to the feet of

more deeply divided leaves, and the petals 3, as bar

of the flower opening before they fall off. · jaws of

All the species are climbing plants, and are 3. A form

mostly found within the tropics, especially CLOUD.

in Asia; a few occur in North America. - um), n.

Cist (sist), n. [ From L. cista, Gr. kiste, a kind of

chest. Chest is simply another form of this HORSE

word.) 1. A case; a chest; a basket; speciti

cally, in archæol. (a) the term applied to 0-sēl), n.

the mystic baskets used in processions conited vein,

nected with the Eleusinian mysteries. (1) A nour.) A

place of interment of an early or prehistorio ion of the

period, consisting of a stone chest formed ; hernia Cirrus or Tendril. of two parallel rows of stones fixed on their

ends, and covered by similar flat stones. kis, a wood-worm.) A genus Such cists are found in barrows or mounds, insects, of the family Xylo inclosing bones. In rocky districts, cists are minute beetles which were sometimes hewn in the rock itself. is species of Boleti or mushrvæ of others do much harm -ure, wood of houses, &c., by

with small holes. Those - books are popularly known n preposition signifying 'on prefixed to the names of

Cist. ns, &c., to form adjectives. dered the point of departure Called also Kist, Cistvaen, and Kistvaen. nan origin.

2. Same as Cyst (which see). 'pin or sis-al'pin), a. (L. cis, cistaceæ (sis-tā'sé-é), n. pl. (See CISTUS.) A and Alpes, Alps, whence nat, order of polypetalous exogens, consist. ] On this side of the Alps, ing, of low shrubby plants or herbs, with Rome; that is, on the south entire leaves and crumpled, generally ephe. posed to transalpine.

meral showy flowers. Some species exude -at-lan'tik), a. Being on this a balsamic resin, such as ladanum, from a ntic Ocean.

species of Cistus found in the countries A fish of the herring kind, bordering the Levant. Four species of the Ontario.

genus Helianthemum are found in Britain, c), n. (Fr. ciseler, to carve or and are commonly called rock-rose. chisel.) 1. The art or oper Cistal (sis'tal), a. A term used by Lindley 9.-2. Chased metal work. to designate one of his 'alliances' of plants.

They are hypogynous exogens, with monon. See CHISLEU.

dichlamydeous flowers, and include the rockis-mon'tán), a. (L. cis, on roses (genus Cistus), crucifers, weldworts, ons, a mountain.) Existing and capparids. ne mountain; specifically, on Cistella (sis-tel'la), n. [L., a casket, dim. of -s: opposed to ultramontane. cista, a box.] In bot. the capsular shield of pa-dān), a. (L. cis, on this some lichens. us, the river Po, whence Cistercian (sis-tér'shi-an), 12. A member of

this side of the Po, with a religious order, which takes its name from ; that is, on the south side. its original convent, Citeaux (Cistercium), sis-sam'pe-los), n. (Gr. near Dijon, where the society was founded ampelos, a vine, because it in 1098 by Robert, abbot of Solesmes, under ivy, and has fruit like the the rule of St. Benedict. They led a coul. s of climbing plants, nat. templative and very ascetic life, and, having maceæ, one of which, the emancipated themselves from the oversight Pareira), yields the root of the bishops, formed a sort of religious rava, used in medicine as a republic, under the government of a high tic.

council of twenty-five members, the abbot , n. [Gr.

of Citeaux being president. In France they ad eidos,

called themselves Bernardines, in honour e of the

of St. Bernard. From the Cistercians emaninvented

ated the barefooted monks, or Feuillants in a view to

France, the nuns of Port-Royal, the Recolthe fa

lets in Spain, and the monks of La Trappe. of the du

The French Revolution reduced the Cisterhe cube,

cians to a few convents in Spain, Austria, m of two A

Poland, and the Saxon part of Upper Lusanals be

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CISTIC

eries.-2. A natural reservoir for water: 2
hollow place containing water, as a fountair
or lake. "The wide cisterns of the lakes,
Sir R. Blackmore.
Cistic (sist’ik), a. See CYSTIC.
Cistus (sis'tus), n. (Gr. kistos.] The rock
rose, a genus of plants of many species, be
longing to the nat, order Cistaceæ, native
of Europe, or of the countries borderin
the Mediterranean. Some of them are bear
tiful evergreen flowering shrubs, and orn
mental in gardens. Gum ladanum is o
tained from C. creticus and C, ladaniferus-
Cistvaen, Kistvaen (kist'va-en or kist'vår
n. See CIST.
Cit (sit), n. [Contracted from citizen.)
citizen; an inhabitant of a city: used
disparagement. The cits of London a
the boors of Middlesex.' Johnson. (Collo-
Citable (sīt'a-bl), a. Capable of being cit
or quoted.
Citadel (sit'a-del), n. (Fr. citadelle, fr-
It. citta, city.) A fortress or castle in
near a city, intended to keep the inha
tants in subjection, or, in case of a siege
form a final point of defence. "Troas
Ilion's columned citadel.' Tennyson.
Cital (siltal), n. 1. The act of citing to appe
a summons. (Rare.)-2. Mention. [Ra
He made a blushing cital of himself.

Sha 3.1 Quotation; citation. Johnson. Citation (si-ta'shon), n. (L. citatio, fr cito, to cite (which see).] 1. A summa

tia. They wear a white cassock with black 1 straight

scapulary, but when officiating are clothed following he diame. circle de

C, take erect the EN R, and cus of the point P, in which ts the ordinate NR, is the d its equation, let AN=X, Chen since

reading book

an official call or notice given to a per to appear in a court, and answert demand; a call or notice to appear various other cases, and the paper cont ing such notice or call.

The remonstrants were ready according to citation

Sir A. HC 2. The act of citing a passage from a bu or from another person, in his own wo also the passage or words quoted; quotat

It is the beauty and independent worth of the tions, far more than their appropriateness, have made Johnson's dictionary popular even

Colerid 3. Specifically, in law, a reference to dec cases or books of authority to mainta point of law.4.1 Enumeration; ment Harvey. Citator (si-tä'ter), n. One who cites. (Ra Citatory (silta-to-ri), a. Citing; calli

having the power or form of citation.
ters citatory.' Ayliffe.
Cite (sit), v.t. pret. & pp. cited; ppr. cit
[Fr. citer, from L. cito, citare, freq. of
to call, to summon.] 1. To call upon of
ally or authoritatively to appear; to s
mon before a person or tribunal; to
legal or official notice to appear in cour
answer or defend.

The cited dead
Or all past ages, to the general doom

Shall hasten.
2. To enjoin; to direct; to summon; to
to order or urge; to rouse. (Rare.]

And had I not been cited so by them
Yet did I purpose as they do entreat,

Si 3. To quote; to name or repeat, as a pa or the words of another, either from a or from verbal communication.

ve is gen

The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose. 4. To refer to in support, proof, or col ation; as, to cite an authority or a prec in proof of a point in law.-5. To me to recount.

We cite our faults That they may hold excused our lawless li 6. To bespeak; to argue; to evid * Aged honour cites a virtuous youth.' Citee, Cite,t n. A city. Chaucer, Citer (sil'er), n. One who cites: (a) or

summons into court. (6) One who qu Citess (sites), n. (See CIT.) A city w

Dryden. (Rare.)
Cithara (sith'a-ra), n. (L., from Gr.ki
whence cittern, gittern, guitar.] An a

QM= V 2ax-x?
AM= 2a -

y? (2a - x)=x. The curve
ranch on the other side of
anches meeting in a cusp at
id have the line HK as an
e area included between the
symptote is three times the
Terating circle. In the cis-
the generating curve is a
term has been employed in
all curves described in a
where the generating curve
bid'al ), a Resembling the
les, applied to mechanical
g of that character.
n. (Gr. Icissos, ivy, in refer-
rambling roots.) The wild
of plants included in the

Cistercian. — Pascal's Collection des Costumes.
with a large white gown, with great sleeves
and a hood of the same colour.
Cistern (sis'tèrn), n (L. cisterna, from cista,
a chest.) 1. An artificial reservoir or recep-
tacle for holding water, beer, or other liquor,
as in domestic uses, distilleries, and brew-

Cithara, from an Egyptian painting. stringed instrument resembling th modern cittern, or guitar. It is me by Homer.

, move;

tūbe, tub, bull;

oil, pound;

ü, Sc. abune; 9, Sc. fey.

478

CISTERN

it climbs-? In zool. a soft same genus with the true vine, but having try appendage to the feet of more deeply divided leaves, and the real 23 bar

of the flower opening before they tal cé jaws of

All the species are climbing plants

, and ar? A form

mostly found within the tropics, caseciahy LOCD.

in Asia; a few occur in North America um),

Cist (sist), 11. (From L

Gr. biti, kind of

chest. Chest is simply another lorma et the Horsk

word] L A case; a chest; a basket; sportcally, in archæol. (a) the term applied in

the mystic baskets used in processions tel-d vein,

nected with the Eleusinian mysteries (1)

place of interment of an early or prekister, on of the

period, consisting of a stone chest fored hernia Cirrus or Tendnl. of two parallel rows of stones fired on the?

ends, and covered by similar fat toen 18, a wood-worm.) A genus Such cists are found in barrows or more sects, of the family Xyio- ! inclosing bones. In rocky districte

, ebt re minute beetles which were sometimes hewn in the rock itself

species of Boleti or mushof others do much harm re, wood of houses, &c., by ith small holes Those woks are popularly known preposition signifying 'on prefixed to the names of

Cist i &c., to form adjectives. red the point of departure Called also Kist, Cistraen, and Kistecau origin

2. Same as Cyst (which see) in or sis-al'pin), a. (L. cis, cistaceæ (sis-ta'se-e), 1. pl. (See CETTS.) A ad Alpes, Alps, whence nat. order of polypetalous exogens, consi

On this side of the Alps, ing of low shrubby plants of berds, with me; that is, on the south entire leaves and crumpled, generally ephe ied to transalpine. meral showy flowers. Some species einde lan'tik), a. Being on this a balsamic resin, such as ladanum, from a c Ocean.

species of Cistus found in the countries fish of the herring kind, bordering the Levant Four species of the ario.

genus Helianthemum are found in Britain, [Fr. ciseler, to carve or and are commonly called rock-rose sel) 1. The art or oper. Cistal (sis'tal), a. A term used by Lindley -2 Chased metal work. to designate one of his 'alliances' of planta

They are hypogynous exogens, with the See CHISLET.

dichlamydeous flowers

, and include thena ion'tán), a. (L. cis, on roses (genus Cistus), crucifers, weldworte

, , a mountain.) Existing

and capparids. lountain; specifically, on Cistella (sis-tella), 71. [L, a casket

, din of pposed to ultramontane. cista, a box.] In bot. tie capsular shielde! lån), a. (L. cis, on this some lichens. the river Po, whence Cistercian (sis-tér'shi-an), n. A member of 3 side of the Po, with a religious order, which takes its naine tra at is, on the south side. its original convent. Citeaux (Cistercium, am'pe-los), th (Gr.-

near Dijon, where the society was founded vlos, a vine, because it in 1098 by Robert, abhot of Solesmes

, under and has fruit like the the rule of St. Benedict. They led a co

climbing plants, nat. ee, one of which, the cira), yields the root used in medicine as a republic, under the government of a high

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(Gr. dos the ated y to

templative and very ascetic life, and, having emancipated themselves from the oversight of the bishops, formed a sort of religious council of twenty-five members, the abbit of Citeaux being president. In France they called themselves Bernardines, in honour of St. Bernard. From the Cistercians emiaated the barefooted monks, or Feuillants in France, the nuns of Port-Royal

, the Recol. lets in Spain, and the monks of La Trappe The French Revolution reduced the Cistercians to a few convents in Spain, Austria

, Poland, and the Saxon part of Upper Lusatia. They wear a white cassock with black scapulary, but when

officiating are clothed

B

NCN

du. be, WO beght ening medeke the ind

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the point p, in which

ordinate NR, is the equation, let A N=2, се

Par

CISTIC

or lake.

and go

old sy

as opp

I ain

Cithar eries.-2. A natural reservoir for water; a

kithard hollow place containing water, as a fountain "The wide cisterns of the lakes. wood,

aceae. . Sir R. Blackmore. Cistic (sist'ik), a. See CYSTIC.

native: Cistus (sis'tus), n. (Gr. kistos.) The rock- Cithar:

cithar: ros a genus of plants of many species, belonging to the nat, order Cistaceæ, natives Cithar: of Europe, or of the countries bordering or åda the Mediterranean. Some of them are beau Cither tiful evergreen flowering shrubs, and orna (which mental in gardens. Gum ladanum is ob- Citicis: tained from C. creticus and C. ladaniferus. manne Cistvaen, Kistraen (kist'va-en or kist'văn), [Rare. n. See CIST.

Citied Cit (sit), n. [Contracted from citizen.) A having citizen; an inhabitant of a city: used in some a disparagement. The cits of London and (Rare.

the boors of Middlesex.' Johnson. (Colloq.] covere Citable (sīt'a-bl), a. Capable of being cited Keats. or quoted.

Citigra Citadel (sit'a-del), n. [Fr. citadelle, from It. citta, city.) A fortress or castle in or cifical near a city, intended to keep the inhabi able fc tants in subjection, or, in case of a siege, to Citine form a final point of defence. Troas and in a ci Ilion's columned citadel.' Tennyson. Citizer Cital(si'tal), n. 1. The act of citing to appear; zein, a summons. (Rare.)-2. Mention. [Rare.) ain, ci

He made a blushing cital of himself. Shak. a city. 3. Quotation; citation. Johnson. Citation (si-ta'shon), n. (L. citatio, from

native cito, to cite (which see).] 1. A summons;

the fr an official call or notice given to a person

which to appear in a court, and answer to a

disting demand; a call or notice to appear, in

entitle various other cases, and the paper contain

tant of ing such notice or call.

habita The remonstrants were ready according to their

dispar citation.

Sir M. Hale. 2. The act of citing a passage from a book ;

3. An or from another person, in his own words;

privile also the passage or words quoted; quotation.

If the It is the beauty and independent worth of the cita

free and tions, far more than their appropriateness, which have made Johnson's dictionary popular even as a

Citizen reading book.

Coleridge. of a cit 3. Specifically, in law, a reference to decided cases or books of authority to maintain a

die ere point of law.-4. + Enumeration; mention. Harvey.

Citizer

citizer Citator (si-ta'ter), n. One who cites. (Rare.) Citatory (si’ta-to-ri), a.

Citizer

Citing; calling; citizen having the power or form of citation. ‘Letters citatory.' Ayliffe.

leges Cite (sit), v.t. pret. & pp. cited; ppr. citing,

Talle (Fr, citer, from L. cito, citare, freq. of cieo,

there in to call, to summon.] 1. To call upon offici

Citizer ally or authoritatively to appear; to sum

of bei mon before a person or tribunal; to give

leges
legal or official notice to appear in court to Our cit
answer or defend,
The cited dead

Citizer
Of all past ages, to the general doom
Shall hasten.

who is

Milton.
2. To enjoin; to direct; to summon; to call;

soldier to order or urge; to rouse. (Rare.]

Citole

musica And had I not been cited so by them Yet did I purpose as they do entreat.

Citrate Shak.

lemon 3. To quote; to name or repeat, as a passage Citrea: or the words of another, either from a book Citric or from verbal communication.

from 1 The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose. Shak. 4. To refer to in support, proof, or confirm

tained ation; as, to cite an authority or a precedent

quanti in proof of a point in law.-5. To mention; contai to recount.

less, in We cite our faults

taste. That they may hold excused our lawless lives. printic

Shak.

makin 6. To bespeak; to argue; to evidence.

CitrilAged honour cites a virtuous youth.' Shak.

of the Citee, Cite,t n. A city. Chaucer.

from I Citer (sit'er), n. One who cites: (a) one who bird 01 summons into court. (6) One who quotes.

from t Citess (sites), n. (See CIT.] A city woman.

Citrin: Dryden. (Rare.)

of bec Cithara (sith'a-ra), n. [L., from Gr. kithara,

stated whence cittern, gittern, guitar. ] An ancient

Citrine a lemo of a yellow name It con acid, 1 Citrin

yellow Citron from

of the Citbara, from an Egyptian painting.

the tre

Citron stringed instrument resembling the more

produ modern cittern, or guitar. It is mentioned

has an by Homer.

0), th

-T)=r&. The curve on the other side of meeting in a cusp at

the line HK as an acluded between the Le is three times the

circle. In the cis. nerating curve is a s been employed in ves described in a he generating curve

Cistercian-Pascal's Collection des Costumes Resembling the with a large white gown, with great sleeres Tied to mechanical and a hood of the same colour.

character Cistern (sis'térn), n. [L cisterna, from cista, rissos, ivy, in refer. ; a chest] 1. An artificial reservoir or recep3 roots.] The wild tacle for holding water, beer, or other liquor

, Es included in the as in domestic uses, distilleries, and brev

, Fr.

ch, chain;

ch, Sc. loch;

& go;

j, job;

ü, Sc. abune; P. Sc. iry,

CLADOCERA

Cladocera (kla-dos'er-a), 1. [Gr. klados,
a branch, and keras, a horn.] An order
of entomostracous crustacea, with two pairs
of branched antennæ, the lower pair of
which serve as oars, and with only one eye
of very large comparative size. The water-
flea (Daphnia pulex), well known as a micro-
scopic object, is one of them.
Claes (kláz), n. pl. Clothes. [Scotch.]
Claggy (klagʻi), a. (A form corresponding
to E. cladgy, from A. Sax. clæg, D. klæg,
clay.] Sticky; unctuous; adhesive; clogging
up. [Scotch.]
Claik, Claik-goose (klāk, klāk' gös), n.
A barnacle-goose. [Scotch.) Written also
Clack-goose. See BARNACLE.
Claim (klam), v.t. [0. Fr. claimer, clamer,
to call or cry, to claim, to challenge, from
L. clamo, to shout.] 1. To ask or seek to
obtain by virtue of authority, right, or sup-
posed right; to challenge as a right; to
assert a right to; to demand as due; as, to
claim obedience or respect; to claim an
estate by descent: with from or of before
the person on whom the claim is made.

And, look, when I am king claim thou of me
The earldom of Hereford.

Shak. 2.1 To proclaim. Spenser.–3.1 To call or name. Spenser. - Ask, Demand, Claim, Require, Beg, Beseech. See ASK. Claim (klām), n. 1. A demand of a right or supposed right; a calling on another for something due or supposed to be due; as, a claim of wages for services; to make a claim on a person, that is, to claim something from him: very common in the phrase to lay claim to a thing, that is, to demand it as a right.

[graphic]

Doth he lay claim to thine inheritance! Shak.
2. A right to claim or demand; a title ta
any debt, privilege, or other thing in pos-
session of another; as, a prince has a
claim to the throne.

A thousand claims to reverence closed
In her as Mother, Wife, and Queen. Tennyson,
3. The thing claimed or demanded; spe-
cifically, in America, Australia, &c., a piece
of public land which a squatter or settle
marks out for himself with the intention of
purchasing it when the government offers i
for sale. Hence-4. A piece of land allottet
to one. --5.1 A loud call. Spenser. [Spelle
by the poet Clame.)-Claim in a service, id
Scots law, a petition addressed by the heis
to the sheriff, in which he states his relation
ship to the deceased, and prays to be serve
heir to him.
Claim (klăm), v. i. 1. To be entitled to a thing
to have a right; to derive a right.

We must know how the first ruler, from whom ar
one claims, came by his authority, before we can kno
who has a right to succeed him in it. Locke.
2. To assert claims; to put forward claim
as, he claims to be the greatest poet
Claimable (kläm'a-bl), a. Capable of bei

claimed or demanded as due; as, wages i
claimable after dismissal.
Claimant (klām'ant), Th. 10. Fr. claima
clamant, pp. of claimer, clamer, to clai
A person who claims; one who demns
anything as his right.
Claimer (klām'er), n. A claimant; one
demands as due." Sir W. Temple. Ra
Claimless (klámles), a. Having no ch

(Rare.)
Claire-cole, Clear-cole (klār'kôl

, klēm
1. (Fr. clair, clear, and colle, glue ore
1. In painting, a preparation of size pt
an absorbent surface to prevent the sin
in of the subsequent coats of oil-paint.--
gilding, a coating of size above which
Clair-obscuret (klár-ob-skūr). (Fr.
obscur.] Same as Chiaroscuro.
Clairvoyance (klár-voi'ans), n. (See C
VOYANT, a.) A power attributed to pe

[graphic]

LADICAFZOUS

Ft, daz, a siz r dink dire, a skarp wavíte are two of WÁS: D. Ratin, te cir: MEG. die,

Cykell 'Army TUR; L dog, cek) I To make se **** Times Warppa dea starp moke, US by sing or using:

to out to raitis, to ebik Prywatot a certain carii

The palace bange ani buzz'o mi docet. 2 To utter sounds of words rapidly ani continually, or with sharpeese abi abrupt.

Dess; to let the tongue run; be toague 24 60 dayet Daniel is perpetually dacking. (Collog]

Bet ah! the more the white goose laid
A civilian or person

It clack'd ad cackled isoze. Trasyon vil law. Warinirim.

Clack (klak), et. 1 To cause to make a i), L cholitas, from sharp, short sound; to rattle; to clap: as, to civis, a citizen, It civilita; clack two pieces of wood together. See

lhe state of being civil CLACK-DISH.-2. To speak without thought; tof manners; civilization, to rattle out. CIVILIZATION,

Unweighed custom makes them clack out anything wiele riws from barbarism their heedless fancy springs.

Feltham. Str Davies, Clack (klak), 11. (See the verb.] 1. A sharp, 4: politenean, or an act of abrupt sound, continually repeated, such is kind attention; an, to

as is made by striking an object, or by illetes. The sweet civili bursting or cracking; as, the clack of a mill

. udton, "The Insolent civility

2. The instrument that strikes the hopper Chesterfield

of a grist-mill, to move or shake it, for dis. elf wild,

charging the corn. - 3. A bell that rings ali orawest civility. Tennyson.

when more corn is required to be put in. "Il ix a-bl), a.

Johnson. - 4. A ball-valve connected with Capable of

the boiler of a locomotive. See BALL-VALVE - 1112 Awhon), n. 1. The act

and CLACK-BOX, 2.-5. A kind of small windthe stato of being civilized;

mill set on the top of a pole to turn and rolnod in manners from

clap on a board for the purpose of frightenun vago lito, and improved in

ing away birds.-6. Continual talk; prattle; gossip; tattle. (Colloq.)

A woman's clack, if I have skill, con) If 'humiliating' was a good Sounds somewhat like a throwster's mill. Swift has seen it frequently used, but

to be legitimate English. He Clack-box (klak'boks), n. 1. In mach. the wirowen, but only civility! box in which a clack-valve works. — 2. In

Naravell. andering a criminal process

locomotives, the box fitted on to the boiler

in which a ball-valve is placed to close the ), pret pp. civilized;

orifice of the feed-pipe, and prevent steam Ini caml; fr criliker,

or hot water reaching the pumps. The ball 180 cvilivy, to civilize

of the clack is raised from its seat by the Msavage state; to intro

stroke of the pump-plunger forcing water on loonganimation among:

against it, which water then passes into

the boiler, while the instant fall of the ball wlfen; to elevate in social

prevents egress from the boiler.

Clack-dish (klak dish), n. A dish former the Worth

ly used by mendicants, having a movable mjest to send instead of a

corer, which they cached to excite the 10tice and sympathy of passengers, and also to signity that the dish was empty.

His vase was to get a decat in her clacadisk. Skak. itaueneatti retinendiculis Clack-door (&lak'dorla A plate of iron

or las corering an aperture in the side of *lack hat It is attached by screws, and een de rendre to gire soons to the valvesatura into which the valve fits Racher Sterki One who or that

Wis - The disk a a mill; the
Checa Rusias) A harmacie goose

Cach Preis valve in pumps

*s single tis. hinged si me edge and Irathie : une larger hat she desertare

a se bo

in the mesmeric state. The clairy (or clairvoyante) is alleged to see by the rather than by the eye, so that he (o discerns objects concealed from sight what is happening at a distance, &c. Clairvoyant (klär-voi'ant), a. (Fr. clear, and voyant, seeing, ppr. of vi videre), to see. ] Of or pertaining to voyance; discerning (through being merized) objects not patent to the sig Clairvoyant, Clairvoyante (klár-v n. A man or woman in a certain s! mesmerism, in which state the sub said to see things not present to the Claise, Clase (klaz), n. pl. Clothes. IS Spelled also Claes

;

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1 of the divů law at a unirerI dare som

whose pursuits are those of Doise ) dream u military or clerical 'Army crack: I sime suryeona ima newspaper, despleing the righteourness of

den start yet follow after a certain civil

to crack, 16 tate: - a justitia civilia of his own

The mere naturalist or whom I mean auch an one as

!

2. To uke mens

continually evite dye the very religies and des; ta lo de imet Niage of God decayed. Daniel is perpetualy distinto

But at de 1 lat), * Advilian or person

1 cadedziazmin Cris law. Warburton. Clack (idak) 1! 11 Tat) (L civiltus, from a sharp, short sore, to nie te up!! estu, a citizen; It einlita; clack two piecus 1.

1. The state of being civil , CLACK-DISH.–2To speak enca juht of manners; civilization to rattle out slider CIVILIZATION

Unweighed custom makes then ut *****have mers from barbarista

their heedless fancy pro 19. '*8 full sor 7 Darker Clack (klak), 11. (See the main !! lles, politeness, or an act of abrupt sound, continually free, L! Arusy, kod attention; as, to as is made by striking an in

yeruitua The sweet civili. bursting or cracking; as, the cike Inden "The insolent civility

2. The instrument that strikes they Chesterfield

of a grist-mill, to move or shakes, o

charging the com.-3. A bell that lamang silent avility. Tennyson.

when more corn is required to ki

Johnson. - A ball-valve connected to RIW'W *b), e Capable of the boiler of a locomotive

. See BALL-TANT

and CLACK-BOX, 2-6. A kind of sale full-is "shon), n. 1. The act

mill set on the top of a pole to tan s! it the state of being elvilized: clap on a boani for the purpere of treatment sugretincu in matiners from ing away birds – Continual talk; prati

: I manage life, and improved in gossip: tattie [Colloq.)

& conta's dark # 1 bare skil. i sms ir humiliating' was a good Socais serba like a throwser's 2 m ini seen it frequently used, but

is le legitimate English. He Clack-box kickboks) a 1. In stock, the 13 13anion, but only 'civihty' bu in which a desk-ralse works - I

iammans, the ka fitted on to the betiko retudering a criminal process

în sich alle is placed to che

Will the red-tape, and PFFER SA 12), # 1 pret & pp. cirited

eerste jactang the I'm ciril; tr. cirkus 11 also civilizer, to civiline

SNÁL the mange facing Fu fim a savage state; to intro I Sive organization and lighten; w elerate in se

to and the mere fyt i matrus the will vject to s and news

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CLADOCERA

with g

the cc

same &

mer,

Cladocera (kla-dos'ér-a), n (Gr. klados, Claith

clad a a branch, and keras, a horn.] An order of entomostracous crustacea, with two pairs 2. pl. of branched antennæ, the lower pair of Clam which serve as oars, and with only one eye A. Sax

which of very large comparative size. The waterflea (Daphnia pulex), well known as a micro Dan.li scopic object, is one of them.

is prole Claes (klāz), n. pl. Clothes. [Scotch.] Claggy (klag'i), a. (A form corresponding

A SWE to E. cladgy, from A. Sax. clæg, D. klæg, they cla

no getti clay.) Sticky; unctuous; adhesive; clogging up. [Scotch.)

2. To c Claik, Claik-goose (klāk, klāk'gös), n. Clam A barnacle-goose. [Scotch.] Written also to stic Clack-goose. See BARNACLE.

[Rare. Claim (klām), v.t. [0. Fr. claimer, clamer,

A chi to call or cry, to claim, to challenge, from Hang L. clamo, tɔ shout.] 1. To ask or seek to obtain by virtue of authority, right, or sup- Clam

the fol posed right; to challenge as a right; to assert a right to; to demand as due; as, to being claim obedience respect; to claim an some

CLAME estate by descent: with from or of before

valvul the person on whom the claim is made.

many And, look, when I am king claim thou of me The earldom of Hereford.

Shak.

clam 2. To proclaim. Spenser.-3. To call or

(Trida name. Spenser. – Ask, Demand, Claim, Require, Beg, Beseech. See ASK.

(Mya Claim (klām), n. 1. A demand of a right

Clam

all the or supposed right; a calling on another for something due or supposed to be due;

Clam as, a claim of wages for services; to make

pine; a claim on a person, that is, to claim some

Clama thing from him: very common in the phrase

Crying

childr to lay claim to a thing, that is, to demand it as a right.

Clama

crying Doth he lay claim to thine inheritance? Shak.

Clama 2. A right to claim or demand; a title to any debt, privilege, or other thing in pos Clamb session of another; as, a prince has a Clamb claim to the throne. A thousand claims to reverence closed

clamp In her as Mother, Wife, and Queen. Tennyson. climb 3. The thing claimed or demanded; spe

climb cifically, in America, Australia, &c., a piece

Hence of public land which a squatter or settler

street marks out for himself with the intention of nyson purchasing it when the government offers it Clamb for sale. Hence-4. A piece of land allotted

climbi to one.-5.7 A loud call. Spenser. (Spelled bring by the poet Clame. ]-Claim in a service, in rare,] Scots law, a petition addressed by the heir

Clamb to the sheriff, in which he states his relation

or clir ship to the deceased, and prays to be served Clame heir to him.

Clamn Claim (klām), v.i. 1. To be entitled to a thing;

They to have a right; to derive a right. We must know how the first ruler, from whom any

Clam one claims, came by his authority, before we can know mann who has a right to succeed him in it. Locke. Clam 2. To assert claims; to put forward claims;

being as, he claims to be the greatest poet of

ness; the age.

Clamr Claimable (klām'a-bl), a. Capable of being

clame claimed or demanded as due; as, wages not

viscou claimable after dismissal.

tenaci Claimant (klām'ant), n. [O. Fr. claimant,

Bacor clamant, pp. of claimer, clamer, to claim.į Cold ss A person who claims; one who demands anything as his right.

Clamc Claimer (klām'ér), n. A claimant; one who demands as due. Sir W. Temple. (Rare.]

• The Claimless (klām'les), a. Having no claim.

Shak. (Rare.)

Clamc Claire-cole, Clear-cole (klár köl, klēr'kol) n. (Fr. clair, clear, and colle, glue or size. )

Clamd

state 1. In painting, a preparation of size put on an absorbent surface to prevent the sinking

Clamd

from in of the subsequent coats of oil-paint. -2. In

1. As gilding, a coating of size above which gold

loud I leaf is be put. Clair-obscuret (klár-ob-skūr). [Fr. clair

by ar

tione obscur.) Same as Chiaroscuro."

comp Clairvoyance (klár-voi'ans), n. (See CLAIR

clamc VOYANT, a.) A power attributed to persons

two e in the mesmeric state. The clairvoyant

clama (or clairvoyante) is alleged to see by the spirit

Asf rather than by the eye, so that he (or she)

clamo discerns objects concealed from sight, tells

field v what is happening at a distance, &c.

prude Clairvoyant (klár-voi'ant), a. [Fr. clair, vellous

should clear, and voyant, seeing, ppr. of voir (L.

factio: videre), to see. ] Of or pertaining to clair

2. An voyance; discerning (through being mesmerized) objects not patent to the sight. echo

Lou Clairvoyant, Clairvoyante (klár-voi'ant),

SYNC n. A man or woman in a certain stage of

hulla mesmerism, in which state the subject is

Clam said to see things not present to the senses.

loud Claise, Clase (kláz), n. pl. Clothes. [Scotch.)

Melis Spelled also Claes. ch, chain; ch, Sc. loch; 8, go; j, job; 0), Fr.

wait on

our с

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