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482

CLARIFICATION

CLARIFIER

stances or agents as gelatine, albumen, al. cohol, heat, &c. Clarifier (klar'i-fi-ér), n. 1. One who or that

which clarifies or purifies; as, whites o egys, blood, and isinglass are clarifiers 0 liquors. — 2. A vessel in which liquor is clari

fied; specifically, a large metallic pan, fo clarifying sugar, &c. Clarify (klari-fi), v.t. pret. & pp. clarified ppr. clarifying. (Fr. clarifier, from L. clar ficare, to clarify, to glorify-clarus, clea and facio, to make.] 1. To make clear; purify from feculent matter; to defecate; fine: applied particularly to liquors; as, clarify wine or syrup. See CLARIFICATIO 2. To make clear; to brighten or illuminat applied to the mind or reason (Rare.]

The Christian religion is the only means to set m upon his legs again, to darify his reason, and rect his will.

South

ng; to clack.

Shak. Clapt him on the hands church bells to remain silent. Called also he cheeks.' Tennyson.

Clap, Clep. – 4. A clack-valve.-5. A clack ou never seen a citizen on a cold morning or windmill for frightening birds. 'A claphis sides, and walking before his shop? per clapping in a garth to scare the fowl

Dryden. from fruit.' Tennyson. rust; to drive together; to shut has

Clapper, t n. See CLAPER. Lowed by to; as, to clap to the door -3. To place or put by a hasty or

Clapper-claw (klap'er-kla), v.t. (Clap, and

claw.] 1. To beat and scratch; to thrash; motion; as, to clap the hand to the

to drub. They're clapper-clawing one anto clap spurs to a horse; to clap one

other; I'll look on.' Shak.-2. To scold; to e hatches; to clap a board over a

abuse with the tongue; to revile.

Clapper-dudgeoni (klap-er-du'jon), n. A is would have clapped him into bedlam.

beggar. Brome.

Spectator. anifest approbation of by striking

Clapset v.t. [Comp. ask, ax.) To clasp. ds together; as, to clap a perform

His botes clapsed fayre and fetisly. Chaucer. the stage. - To clap hands, to strike Clap-sill (klap'sil), n. In hydraulic engin. Is together, (a) in token of the con a mitre-sill; the bottom part of the frame of an agreement. So clap hands on which lock-gates shut. argain.' Shak (6) As a mark of Clap-trap (klap'trap), n. 1.7

A contrivance or delight. - To clap up, (a) to for clapping in theatres.-2. Fig. an artifice complete hastily; as, to clap up a

or device to elicit applause or gain popu

larity; management to entrap; bunkum. er match clapped up so suddenly? Shak. He played to the galleries, and indulged them of

course with an endless succession of clap-traps. prison without formality or delay.

Brougham. ce clapped him up as his inveigler. Shak. Clap-trap (klap'trap), a. Designing or dep the wings, to flap them, or to

signed merely to catch applause. The em together so as to make a noise. unworthy arts of a clap-trap orator.' A. K. -d that claps his wings at dawn.'

H. Boyd. n. - To clap hold of, to seize roughly

Claque (klak), n. (Fr., from claquer, to clap lenly.

the hands, to applaud.) A name applied -p), v. i. 1. To come together sud

collectively to a set of men, called claqueurs, th noise; to make a noise by rapping

who, in theatres, are regularly hired to ap'A clapper clapping

plaud the piece or the actors. The scheme

originated in Paris, where an office was esh. Tennyson.

tablished for the insurance of dramatic e doors around me clapt. Dryden.

success. The term is also applied to the egin or set to work with alacrity scheme or system itself. kness.

Claqueur (klak-ür), n. A member of the r, I would desire you to clap into your claque. Claqueurs have each a respective For, look you, the warrant's come. Shak. role allotted to them—thus, the rieur must ike the hands together in applause.

laugh at the comic parts; the pleureur weep sock, as at a door. Chaucer. -5.1 To

at the pathetic; the bisseur call encore, and to prattle or prate continually or so on-and all generally clap their hands

and applaud. P), n. 1. A collision of bodies with

Clare (klar), n. A nun of the order of St. bang; a slap.

Clare. door such a clay as you go out as will

Clare constat (klá're kon'stat), n. [L., it is whole rooni.

Swift.

clearly established.] In Scots law, a preden act or motion: generally in

cept of clare constat is a deed executed by t a clap, that is at a blow, all at

a subject superior, for the purpose of completing the title of his vassal's heir to the

lands held by the deceased vassal. fty of my followers at a clap! Shak.

Clarence (klar'ens), n. A close four-wheeled -t or peal of thunder.

carriage, with one seat inside and a driver's is past and now the skies are clear.

seat.

Dryden Clarenceux, Clarencieux (klar'en-sū), n. king of hands to express approba [Said to be from the Duke of Clarence, son houts and claps.' Shak. Unex

of Edward III., who first held the office.) laps or hisses.' Addison. - 5. In

In Great Britain, the second king-at-arms, the nether part of the beak of a

inferior only to the Garter. His province Bailey.

comprises that part of England south of ap), n. [D. klapoor, clap: 0. Fr.

the river Trent. Formerly called Surroy venereal sore.) A venereal dis

(southern king) in contradistinction to Noronorrhea.

roy, the northern provincial king-at-arms. up), v.t. To infect with venereal

Clare-obscure (klār'ob-skūr), n. (L. clarus,

clear, and obscurus, obscure. In painting, -rd (klap'bord), n. 1. A thin narrow

light and shade; chiaroscuro. - covering houses. (United States.)

Claret (klar'et), n. (Fr. clairet, from clair, for casks.

clear; It. claretto.] 1. The name given in -rd (klap'bord), v.t. To cover with

England to the red wines of Bordeaux. In -ds, as a house. (United States.)

France the name clairet is given only to ad, Clap-cake (klap' bred, klap'. wines of a light red colour. — 2. Blood.

A kind of oatmeal cake clapped (Pugilistic slang. ) d out thin and baked hard. Halli

Claret (klar'et),

a. Having the colour of

claret wine. He wore a claret coat.' D. (klap'dish), n. A wooden bowl or

Jerrold. Jack-dish (which see).

Claret-cup (klar'et-kup), n. A summer tor (klap' dok-ter), n. One who

beverage, composed of iced claret, a little professes the cure of venereal dis

brandy, and a slice or two of lemon or other quack.

favouring ingredients. he first clap-doctor that I met with in his Claret-jug (klar'et-jug), n. A fancy glass or

Taller.

silver decanter, with lip and handle, for Clapper,t n. (Fr. clapier.) A holding claret. -rrow. Chaucer,

Claribel-fute (klar'i-bel-flūt), n. An organ (klap'net), n. A net in hinged stop similar to the claribella, but generally for taking larks and other small of four feet pitch. ich is made to fold smartly over on Claribella (klar-i-bella), n. An organ stop, he pulling of a string, and to which of a soft and sweet quality of tone, consist

are allured either by a looking ing of open wood pipes, usually of eight feet a call-bird. It is much used by pitch. catchers who supply the London Clarichord (klar'i-kord), n. (L. clarus, clear,

and chorda, a string. See CHORD ) An an. (klap), n. Same as Clapper, 3. cient musical stringed instrument, resem: v.i. To knock repeatedly; to talk bling the manichord. Called also Clavi. aucer.

chord. klap'ér), n. 1. A person who claps Clarification (klar'i-fi-kā"shon), n. The act ads by clapping. -2. That which of clarifying; particularly the clearing or strikes, as the tongue of a bell, the fining of liquid substances from all feculent a clap-dish, or the piece of wood matter by the separation of the insolublo kes a mill-hopper. - 3. In the medi particles which prevent the liquid from zrch, a wooden rattle used as a being transparent. This may be performed = to prayers on the three last days by filtration, but the term is more especially eek, when it was customary for the applied to the use of such clarifying sub

3.1 To glorify.
Fadir, the hour cometh, carise thy sonne.

Wickliffe. St. John xvii.
Clarify (klar'i-fi), v.i. 1. To grow or beco
clear or free from feculent matter; to
come pure, as liquors; as, cider clarifies
fermentation. --2. To clear up intellec
ally; to grow clear or bright.
His wits and understanding do clarify and br

Васо,
up in the discoursing with another.
Clarigatet (klari-gāt), v.i. (L. clarigo,
rigaturn.) To proclaim war against an ene
with religious services. Holland. (Rar
Clarinet, Clarionet (klar'i-net, klari-on-
1. (Fr. clarinette - L. clarus, clear.
CLARION.) A wind - instrument of mu
made of wood, and similar in shape to
oboe, but of rather larger dimensions.
has a fixed mouthpiece, containing a ri
which forms the upper joint of the ins
ment. The compass of the clarinet is ab
three octaves and a half from E in the ti
space of the bass, including all the in
mediate semitones. --Bass clarinet, an
strument played on in the same manne
the common clarinet. Its compass is I
octaves, and it descends to B flat below
bass-statf. It is of wood, and its lengti
2 feet 8 inches. - Contra-bass clarinet,
instrument which, in form and manne
fingering, differs but little from the
clarinet. It is of the size of the basso
and in compass four notes lower.--Clario
stop. See KRUMMHORN.
Clarino (klä-rë'no), n. [It.] 1. A clar

Moore. 2. An organ stop consisting of
pipes, generally of four feet pitch.
Clarion (klar'i-on), n. [L. L. clario, clario
a clarion, Fr. clairon, from L. clarus, cL
from its clear sound.) A kind of tr
pet whose tube is narrower and tone in
trumpet
Clarionet. See CLARINET.

[graphic]

acute and shrill than that of the com

Clarisonous (kla-ris'ob-us), a. [L clo
clear, and sonus, a sound.] Having a
sound. Ash. [Rare.)
Claritude (klar'i-tud), n. (L. clari
from clarus, clear.] Clearness; splen
Those claritudes which gild the
Beau, d Fl
Clarity (klar'i-ti), n. [L claritas,
clarus, clear.) Clearness; brightness;

Floods in whose more than crystal clarit
Innumerable virgin graces grow.

F. Beaut
Claro-obscuro (klä'ro-ob-skoʻro), n.
It] Same as Chiaroscuro.
Clarret (klár), n. [Fr.) Wine mixer
honey and spices, and afterwards st
till it is clear.
Clart (klárt), 0.t. [Perhaps from a
equivalent to Bw. lort, filth, with pre
To daub, smear, or spread; to dirty.
vincial English and Scotch.]
Clart (klärt), T. (Sc.] 1. A daub; as,

of greage.-2. pl. Tenacious mire or
Clarty, Clorty (klärti

, klorti), a,
muddy; sticky and foul; very dirty.
(Scotch]
Claryt (klá'ri), v. [L, clarus, clear,
To make a loud or shrill noise. Gol
Clary (klari), n. [A corruption
Scared.) A plant of the genus 8a
sage (Salvia Sclarea). Bacon.
Clary-water (klā'ri-wa-ter), n. Ac
tion of brandy, sugar, clary flowe
cinnamon, with a little ambergris d
in it: formerly much used as a cap
help digestion
Clash (klnsh), v. [An imitative
comp. D. kletsen, G. Kluischen, Dan.

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CLARIFIER

con

482

CLARIFICATION * Clapt him on the hands church bells to remain silent. Called ale eks' Tennyson

Clap, Clep.- 1. A clack-valve -5. A clas seen a citizen on a cold moming

or windmill for frightening biris. 'a dla and walking before his shop! per clapping in a garth to scare the in

Dryden. drive together; to shut has. Clapper,t n. See CLAPER.

from fruit.' Tennyson. y lo; as, to clap to the door Clapper-claw (klap'er-kla), v.t. (Cap

, and place ar put by a basty or 23, to clap the hand to the claw.) 1. To beat and scratch; to thrasti

, purs to a horse; to clap one

to drub. “They're clapper-daving one n. les; to clap a board over a

other; I'll look on' Shak.-2 To scold;

abuse with the tongue; to revile. have dapped him into bedlam. Clapper-dudgeon 1 (klap-er-doʻjon)

, a. A beggar. Brome, pprobation of by striking Clapse

, t v.t. (Comp. ask, az.) To clasz her; as, to clap a perform

His botes clapsed fayre and fetisy. Cazz. -To dap hands, to strike Clap-sill (klap'sil), n. In hydraulic empie ler, (a) in token of the con 8 mitre-sill; the bottom part of the trade Teement 'So clap hands on which lock-gates shut.

Shak () As a mark of Clap-trap (klap'trap), n. 1.1 A contrirane ight - To dap up. (a) to for clapping in theatres.—2 Fig. an artita e hastily; as, to clap up a

or device to elicit applause or gain pope

larity; management to entrap; bunkum lapped up so suddenly! Skak. He played to the galleries, and indulged ttad

course with an endless succession of daytra. rithout formality or delay.

Broagens him up as his inveigler. Shak. Clap-trap (klap'trap), a. Designing or deings, to flap them, or to

signed merely to catch applauze. "The

unworthy arts a dap-trap orator.' A. E her so as to make a noise.

H. Boyd.
laps his wings at dawn'
ap hold of, to seize roughly Claque

(klak)
, . (Fr., from clagter

, to elap the bands, to applaud) d name applied 1 To come together sud collectively to a set of men, called clogueurs, to make a noise by rapping who, in theatres, are regularly hired to ap

originated in Paris, where an office was ex TYBOL

tablished for the insurance of dramatic and me dan Dryden.

success. The term is also applied to the set to work with alacrity scheme or system itself.

Claqueur (klak-ür), n. A member of the desire you to day into your claque. Claqueurs have each a respective 1, the warrant's come. Shak. role allotted to them—thus, the rieur must

at the pathetic; the bisseur call encore, and a door. Chaucer ---6. To

so on-and all generally clap their hands 2 or prate continually or

and applaud.

ck A clapper clapping plaud the piece or the actors. The scheme

Clas

nds together in applause. laugh at the comic parts; the pleureur weep

to e

Clare.

2.

stances or agents as gelatine, albumen, al to c cohol, heat, &c.

viol Clarifier (klar'i-fi-ér), n. 1. One who or that which clarifies or purifies; as, whites of

2. T eggs, blood, and isinglass are clarifiers of liquors.--2. A vessel in which liquor is clari nois fied; specifically, a large metallic pan, for

cha clarifying sugar, &c.

The Clarify (klar i-fi), v.t. pret. & pp. clarified; ppr. clarifying. (Fr. clarifier, from L. clari

3. F ficare, to clarify, to glorify--clarus, clear, and facio, to make.] 1. To make clear; to

to i purify from feculent matter; to defecate; to

thei fine: applied particularly to liquors; as, to

NC clarify wine or syrup. See CLARIFICATION.

clas 2. To make clear; to brighten or illuminate: applied to the mind or reason. (Rare.]

Clas

soul The Christian religion is the only means to set man

T upon his legs again, to clarify his reason, and rectify his will.

South. Clas 3. To glorify.

mee

toge Fadir, the hour cometh, clarifie thy sonne. lisic Wickliffe. St. John xvii. 1,

voic Clarify (klar'i-li), v. i. 1. To grow or become

н. clear or free from feculent matter; to be

with come pure, as liquors; as, cider clarifies by fermentation.-2. To clear up intellectu 2. F ally; to grow clear or bright.

diff His wits and understanding do clarify and break

pur up in the discoursing with another. Bacon.

and

Clas Clarigatet (klar'i-gát), v.i. (L. clarigo, cla

scar rigatum.] To proclaim war against an enemy the with religious services. Holland. (Rare.] of a Clarinet, Clarionet (klar'i-net, klar'i-on-et),

a sp n. [Fr, clarinette -- L. clarus, clear. See CLARION.) A wind - instrument of music,

Bur made of wood, and similar in shape to the Clas oboe, but of rather larger dimensions. It

site has a fixed mouthpiece, containing a reed, Clas which forms the upper joint of the instrument. The compass of the clarinet is about

ing. three octaves and a half from E in the third

Clas

clap space of the bass, including all the intermediate semitones.- Bass clarinet, an instrument played on in the same manner as

grip

thir the common clarinet. Its compass is four

to h octaves, and it descends to B flat below the bass-staff. It is of wood, and its length is

diff 2 feet 8 inches. -Contra-bass clarinet, an

clos instrument which, in form and manner of

clas fingering, differs but little from the bass

Clas clarinet. It is of the size of the bassoon, and in compass four notes lower.-Clarionet

get!

as, stop. See KRUMMHORN. Clarino (klä-rē'no), n. (It.) 1. A clarion.

byt

clin Moore.-2. An organ stop consisting of reed the pipes, generally of four feet pitch. Clarion (klar'i-on), n. [L.L. clario, clarionis,

ing. a clarion, Fr. clairon, from L. clarus, clear, the from its clear sound.) A kind of trum frie pet whose tube is narrower and tone more acute and shrill than that of the common

Clas trumpet. Clarionet. See CLARINET. Clarisonous (kla-ris'on-us), a. [L. clarus, Clas clear, and sonus, a sound.] Having a clear clas sound.

Ash. (Rare.] Claritude (klar'i-tūd), m. (L. claritudo, from clarus, clear.) Clearness; splendour. app "Those claritudes which gild the skies.'

ins Beau. & Fl. Clarity + (klar'i-ti), n. (L. claritas, from

Clas clarus, clear.) Clearness; brightness; splen clas dour.

Clas Floods in whose more than crystal clarity

bla Innumerable virgin graces grow.

F. Beaumont.

an Claro-obscuro (klä'ro-ob-sköʻrő), n. [oid whf It.) Same as Chiaroscuro.

ope Clarret (klär), n. (Fr.) Wine mixed with kni honey and spices, and afterwards strained

Clas till it is clear.

clos Clart (klärt), v.t. (Perhaps from a word

Clas equivalent to Sw. lort, filth, with prefix ge.]

hea To daub, smear, or spread; to dirty. [Pro

Clas vincial English and Scotch.)

alsc

апс Clart (klärt), n. [Sc.] 1. A daub; as, a clart

lar of grease. -2. pl. Tenacious mire or mud. Clarty, Clortý (klärti, klor'ti), a. Miry;

to

2. muddy; sticky and foul; very dirty. Burns. (Scotch.)

per

res Claryt (klā'ri), v.i. (L. clarus, clear, shrill. ]

To make a loud or shrill noise. Golding. prc Clary (kláʻri), n. (A corruption of L.L. ph

T Sclarea! A plant of the genus Salvia or sage (Salvia Sclarea). Bacon.

clas Clary-water (klā'ri-wa-ter), n. A composi

link tion of brandy, sugar, clary flowers, and

3. cinnamon, with a little ambergris dissolved

det in it: formerly much used as a cardiac to help digestion.

pui

Dry

à V son

ass

I collision of bodies with Clare (klar), n. A nun of the order of St 3p. a clay as you go out as will Clare constat (kli're konstat), n. [L, it is

Swift.

clearly established.] In Scots law, a upp s motion: generally in

cept of clare constat is a deed executed by hat is at a blow, all at

a subject superior, for the purpose of com

pleting the title of his vassal's heir to the Jwers at a day! lands held by the deceased vassal

. Skak. thunder.

Clarence (klar'ens), 1. A close four-wheeled

carriage, with one seat inside and a driver's how the skies are clear. sest.

Dryden ds to express approba- (Said to be from

the Duke of Clarence

, son Clarenceus, Clarencieux (klar'en-si ) n claps' Shak. "Unex

of Edward III., who first held the office) ses. Addison.-5. In

In Great Britain, the second king-at-armis, part of the beak of a

inferior only to the Garter. His province klapoor, clap; O.Fr.

comprises that part of England south of are.) A venereal dis

the river Trent. Formerly called Surny

(southern king) in contradistinction to Ner: infect with venereal Clare-obscure (klár ob-skür), 2. (L darts

roy, the northern provincial king-at-arma 1), n. 1. A thin narrow

clear, and obscurus, obscure. In painting,

light and shade; chiaroscuro. zses. (United States.) Claret

(klaret), n. (Fr. dairet, from clair, ), v.t. To cover with

clear; It claretto.) 1. The nazne given in England to the red wines

of Bordeaux la e (l'nited States.]

France the name clairet is given only to se (klap'bred, klap': atmeal cake clapped [Pugilistic slang.)

wines of a light red colour.–2. Blood a baked hard. Halli- ) Claret (klar'et), a. Having the colour of

claret wine. He wore a claret coat.' D. A wooden bowl or

Jerrold. ch see) Claret-cup (klar'et-kup)

, 1. A summer -tér), n. One who

beverage, composed of iced claret, a little cure of venereal dis

brandy, and a slice or two of lemon or other

Hlavouring ingredients. -- that I met with in his. Claret-Jug (klar'et-jug), n. A fancy glass or

Tatier.

silver decanter, with lip and handle, for (Fr. clapier.) A holding claret.

Claribel-flute (klari-bel-Alīt), n. An organ A net in hinged stop similar to the claribella, but generalls s and other small of four feet pitch. old smartly over on Claribella (klar-i-bella), n. An organ stop, tring, and to which

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gre

al Clash (klash), v.i. [An imitative word; comp. D. kletsen, G. klatschen, Dan. klatsche, by

8, go; ch, chain; ch, Sc. loch;

j, job; is,

of a soft and sweet quality of tone, consistther by a looking ing of open wood pipes, usually of eight feet

is much used by pitch. zipply the London Clarichord (klar'i-kord), 11. (L. clarus, clear

, e as Clapper, 3. cient musical stringed instrument

, resemirepeatedly; to talk

chord. person who claps Clarification (klar'i-fi-ka"shon), n. The act -2. That which ngue of a bell, the che piece of wood -.-3. In the medirattle used as a

and chorda, a string. See CHORD) An allbling the manichord. Called also Clari

of clarifying; particularly the clearing or fining of liquid substances from all feculent matter by the separation of the insoluble particles which prevent the liquid from

being transparent. This may be performed The three last days by Bitration, but the term is more especially customary for the applied to the use of such clarifying sulu

U, Sc. abune; }, Sc. les

484

CLAW

CLAW

extremity belonging to any animal meml or appendage.

The maxillary palps in the Spiders are long join appendages, terminated in the females by poin daus.

H. A. Nicholso 2. The whole leg or foot of such anir (crustaceans, spiders, &c.) as have cur jointed legs usually terminating in a sh point; in a special sense applied to pincers of certain shell-fish, as the lobs crab, &c.—3. The hand: in contempt. J son.-4. Anything shaped like the clawo animal, as the crooked forked end of a h mer used for drawing nails.-5. In bot. narrow base of a petal, especially whe is long, as in the pink and wallflower this sense called also Unguis (which se Claw (kla), v.t. 1. To tear, scratch, pul seize with, or as with, claws or nails.

Like wild beasts shot up in a cage, to clan bite cach other to their mutual destruction. B 2. To relieve as if by scratching: to scr: as an itching part, with intent to grati Look, whether the wither'd elder hath not h

S/ Hence-3. To fawn on; to flatter.

Rich men they claw, soothe up, and fatte poor they contemn and despise.

Holl -To claw off, t to claro away, i to rail :

; dis

daw'd like a parrot.

Bp. Nicho

es in

ig to

o the Clatteringly (klat'er-ing-li), ado. With 2. One of the keys by means of which a player clattering.

of carillons performs on the bells. diom Claudent (kla'dent), a. (L. claudens, from Clavel, n. See CLAVY.

claudo, to shut. ) Shutting; confining; Clavellated (klav'el-lāt-ed), a. (L.L. claveled in drawing together; as, a claudent muscle. latus, from clavella, dim. of L. clava, a club, Johnson (Rare.)

a billet of wood.] Relating to billets of ile of Claudicant (kla'di-kant), a. (See below.) wood.-Clavellated ashes, potash and pearlHalting; limping. Johnson. (Rare.]

ash, so termed from the billets or little

clubs al sen

Claudicate 1 (kla'di-kāt), v.i. (L. claudico, from which they are obtained by burning, Mill. to limp, from claudus, lame.) To halt or Clavellinida (klav-el-lin'i-de), n. pl. IL ring a limp. Bailey.

clavella, dim. of clava, a club, and Gr. eidos, Care.j claudication (kla-di-kā'shon), n. A halt likeness.) A family of social ascidians. Each ester. ing or limping; a limp. (Rare.)

individual has its own heart, respiratory I have lately contracted a ... claudication in apparatus, and digestive organs; but each [See my left foot.

Steele. is fixed on a footstalk that branches from a class claught (klacht), pret. & pp. of an obsolete

common creeping stem or stolon, through those verb cleche or clache, to clutch. [Old

which a circulation takes place that connects each English and Scotch.)

them all. They are so transparent that their The carlin claught her by the rump,

internal structure can be easily observed. I nat. And left poor Maggie scarce a stump.

Burns.

They propagate both by ova and buds. i two

Claver + (klaver), n. Clover. The desert land Claught (klacht), n. A catch; a hold; as, with sweet claver fills.' Sandys. ental I took a claught o' him. (Scotch.)

Claver (kla'ver), v... [Allied to Dan. Iclaffe, tany, Clause (kląz), n. (Fr. clause, from L.L. to slander; G. klaffen, to chatter.) To talk al re

clausa, for L. clausula, a conclusion, and as idly and foolishly; to talk much and at o the

a law term a clause, from claudo, clausum, random. (Scotch.) ified. to close.] 1. In gram. a member of a com

As gude a man ... as ever ye heard claver in a pound sentence containing both a subject y are

pulpit

Sir W. Scott. vided and its predicate.-2. An article in a coninto tract or other writing; a distinct part of a

Claver (klá' vėr), n. 1. An idle story. into contract, will, agreement, charter, commis 2. pl. Idle talk; gossip. (Scotch.] sion, or the like;

a distinct stipulation, con I have kend mony chapmen neglect their goods to long dition, proviso, &c. In Scots law, certain carry clashes and clavers up and down, from one lassi clauses in deeds are expressed according to

country-side to another.

Sir W. Scott. 'well.

certain technical forms, and are of several Claviceps (klav'i-seps), n. [L. clava, a club, lassi kinds; as, clause of devolution, a clause de caput, a head.) A genus of fungi. Called

volving some office, obligation, or duty on a also Cordiceps. See CORDICEPS and ERGOT, 2. party in a certain event, as, for example, on Clavichord (klav'i-kord), n. [L. clavis, a key,

the failure of another to perform; clause of uctists

and chorda, a string.) Same as Clarichord. lees. return, a clause by which the granter of a Clavicle (klav'i-kl), n. (L. clavicula, a little

rtic right makes a

distinction of it, and ified;

key or fastener, from clavis, a key or lock.) facio, provides that in a certain event it shall re

The collar-bone, forming one of the eleturn to himself; clauses irritant and resoluLsses;

ments of the pectoral arch in vertebrate tive, clauses devised for limiting the right animals. In man and sundry quadrupeds of an absolute proprietor in entails.

there are two clavicles or collar-bones, arac

Clause-rolls (kląz'rõlz), n. pl. Same as each joined at one end to the scapula
Close Rolls. See under CLOSE.

or shoulder-bone, and at the other to the npt at

Claustral (kląs'tral), a. [L. L. claustralis, sternum or breast-bone. ent in

In many quadru. Cox.

from L. claustrum, an inclosure, and in late peds the clavicles are absent or rudimen

times a cloister, from claudo, to shut.] 1. Re tary, while in birds they are united in one sort.

lating to a cloister; as, a claustral prior. piece, popularly called the 'merry-thought.' nen. See PRIOR.-2. Resembling a religious house Clavicorn (klav'i-korn), n. A member of lon.

in its seclusion; cloister-like; secluded. tion,

the family Clavicornes. Clausular (kląz'ū-lér), a. (L. clausula. See rmed

Clavicornes (klav-i-kornēz), n. pl. [L. clava, CLAUSE.) Consisting of or having clauses. a club, and cornu, a horn.) A family of pen.

Clausule (kląz'ül), n. A little clause. Bp. tamerous beetles, so named from the antenne ry. . Peacock.

being thickened

at the apex so as to terminate ations Clausure (kląz'ūr), n. (L. clausura. See

in a club-shaped enlargement. The species vin. CLAUSE.) 1. The act of shutting up or con are partly terrestrial and partly aquatic. men fining; confinement. (Rare.]

The burying-beetles and bacon-beetles may es, a In some monasteries the severity of the clausure

be regarded as examples. has is hard to be borne.

Dr. A. Geddes. Clavicular (kla-vik'ú-ler), a. Pertaining to ty in 2. In anat. the absence of a perforation

the collar-bone or clavicle. lours where it normally occurs.-3. An inclosure. Clavier (klā'vi-er), n. [Fr. clavier, from L. 'ding Claut (kląt), v. t. [Closely connected with clavis, a key.) In music, the key-board of (ford clod, clot, a thick, round mass.) To rake or a pianoforte, organ, harmonium, or other both scrape together. Burns. (Scotch.)

instrument whose keys are arranged on the st in Claut (klạt), n. 1. An instrument for raking claviform (klav'i-form), a. [L. clara, 1 xam

or scraping together mire, weeds, &c. only 2. What is so scraped together; a hoard club, and forma, a shape.] Same as Clarided scraped together by dirty work or niggard-clavigert (klav'i-jér), n. 1. [L. clavis, a key:

liness. [Scotch.] w at She has gotten a coof wi' a claut o' siller. Burus.

and gero, to carry. 1 One who keeps the

keys of any place. -2. [L. clava, a club, and laut. Clavaria (kla-vā'ri-a), n. (L. clava, a club.] gero, to carry.] One who bears & club; a LS, a A genus of fungi, belonging to the division club-bearer. ided Hymenomycetes, and having a fleshy sub: Clavigerous (kla-vij'ér-us), a. [See above.)

stance and a confluent stem; club-shaped Bearing a key. Clarke. und. sungus. Some species are edible.

Clavipalp (klav'i-palp), n. A member of One species is called gray-goat's

the family Clavipalpi. 1. To beard.

Clavipalpi (klav'i-pal-pi), n. pl. (L. clava, ated Clavate, Clavated (klā'vāt, kla'.

a club, and palpi, feelers.) Same as Eroodies vāt-ed), a. (L. clava, a club; in

tylidæ. "; to second sense rather from clavus,

Clavis (kla'vis), n. [L., a key.) That which and a nail.) 1. In bot, and zool, club

serves to unlock or explain any difficulty, shaped; having the form of a club;

as a translation of a foreign author; or that growing gradually thicker toward

which serves to explain a cipher; a key. the top, as certain parts of a

Clavula (klav'ü-la), n. [L., dim. of clava, plant; claviform. -2. In anat. the

a club.] In bot. the receptacle of certain term applied to a species of arti- Clavate. fungi. vift. culation. See GOMPHOSIS.

Clavus (kla'vus), n. [L., a nail.] The disClavati (kla-vá'tí), n. pl. [L. clava, a club.] ease produced in grains of rye and other ssion

A family of fungi, belonging to the division inds;

grasses when they are changed to a brown Hymenomycetes, characterized by bearing or blackish colour by the action of the early atter

basidiospores covering the tip and sides of state of the parasitical fungus Cordiceps ickle

branched or simple club-shaped receptacles. (Claviceps) purpurea. See ERGOT. Clavation (kla-vā'shon), n. (See CLĀVATE.] Clavy, Clavel (klav'i, klav'el), 7. In arch. Same as Gomphosis.

a mantel-piece. lak. Clave (klāv), pret. of cleave.

Claw (kla), n. (A. Sax. clawu, cla, a claw; ncial Clave (klāv), n. A kind of stool used by cog. D. klaauw, a claw or paw, Icel. klo, ship-carpenters.

Dan and Sw. klo, G. klaue, a claw; probaclat- Clavecin (klav'e-sin), n. [Fr. clavecin, from bly allied to cleave, to adhere.] 1. The ace.' It. clavicembalo, L. clavis, a key, and cym sharp hooked nail of a quadruped, bird, or

valum, a cymbal. ] 1. A harpsichord. - other animal; or more generally, a hooked

les, a

scold.
Mr. Baxter ::

claws off the Episcopal p a set of Cassandrian priests.

The jade Fortune is to be claw'd away fort should lose it.

Sir R, L Estr Claw (klą), v.i. Naut. to beat to wind

to prevent falling on a lee shore or other vessel: with of; hence, (fig.) off ; to escape. Claw-back (kla bak), n. Lit. on claws the back; one who flatters; a

phant; a wheedler. Mir, for Mags. Claw-backt (klasbak), a. Flattering

Hall.
Claw - backt (klg'bak), v. t. To f

Warner
Clawed (klad), a. Furnished with cha
Claw-hammer (kla'ham-mer), n. A
mer so named from one end of it
divided into two claws, for convenie
drawing nails out of wood.
Clawless (kləʻles), a. Destitute of cla
Clawsick (kia'sik), a. Suffering, as
from foot-rot or claw-sickness.
Claw-sickness (kla'sik-nes), n. Foot
disease in cattle and sheep.
Claw - wrench (kla'rensh), n. A
having a loose pivoted jaw and a rela
fixed one 50 arranged as to bite to
when they are made to grip an objec
Clay (kla), n. (A. Sax. clæg, Dan. Klæg
klei, D. klai, klei, G. klei, clay. From
signifying to stick or adhere, seen
cleave, to adhere, clue, clog, clot, y
gluten.] 1. The name common to
viscous earths, compounds of silica a
mina, sometimes with lime, magnes
or potash, and metallic oxides. All
rieties are characterized by being fin
herent, weighty, compact, and has
dry, but stiff, viscid, and ductile whe
smooth to the touch; not readily
in water, and when mixed not reas
siding in it. They contract by heat
absorb water greedily, and become
are so tenacious as to be moulded
shape, and hence they are the ma
many varieties of clay used for
purposes, as pipe-clay, potter's clu

bricks and tiles, pottery, &c. T

2; D.

I on:

i but

as to

clay, porcelain clay, &c.—2. In po in Scrip. earth in general, especial material of the human body.

I also am formed out of the clay. Job Their spirits conquered when their clay ---Kimmeridge clay, Oxford cla clay. See these terms in their alp places. ---Clay iron-ore, clay irons of the most valuable of the ferriferfrom which iron is procured in gi dance. It occurs chiefly in the sures of Scotland, Staffordshire, S and Wales. Clay (kla), a. Formed or consistias, a clay soil. Clay (klã), v.t. 1. To cover or me

clay. The ground must be dag Mortimer.-- 2. To purify and w clay, as sugar.-3. To puddle wit Clay-brained (kli'brand), a. Dpid. Shak Clay-built (kläbilt)

, a Built Clay-built cisterns.'' Dr. E. DE

[graphic]
[blocks in formation]

484

CLAW

dug.

It ra

Silur

earth extremity belonging to any animal member Clayor appendage. The maxillary palps in the Spiders are long jointed Claye

fort. appendages, terminated in the females by pointed

H. A. Nicholson, inters dars. 2. The whole leg or foot of such animals Claye

Dured (crustaceans, spiders, &c.) as have curved

fied jointed legs usually terminating in a sharp

sugar point; in a special sense applied to the pincers of certain shell-fish, as the lobster, Claye

abou crab, &c.—3. The hand: in contempt. John

like son.-4. Anything shaped like the claw of an

2. Be animal, as the crooked forked end of a ham

Wh mer used for drawing nails.-5. In bot, the

grow narrow base of a petal, especially when it

theret is long, as in the pink and wallfiower: in this sense called also Unguis (which see). Clayi:

ture Claw (kla), v.t. 1. To tear, scratch, pull, or seize with, or as with, claws or nails. "Clay

Like wild beasts shut up in a cage, to claw and Claybite each other to their mutual destruction, Burke, burni 2. To relieve as if by scratching: to scratch, Clay

chall as an itching part, with intent to gratify, Look, whether the wither'd elder hath not his poll

Clay claw'd like a parrot.

Shak.

and t Hence-3. To fawn on; to flatter.

Clayu

mor, Rich men they claw, soothe up, and Aatter; the

and poor they contemn and despisc. Holland.

hand -To claw off, t to claw away,t to rail at; to now scold.

swort Mr. Baxter , claws off the Episcopal party as

Clay a set of Cassandrian priests. Bp. Nicholson.

The jade Fortune is to be claw'd away fort, if you Clay should lose it.

Sir R. L' Estrange. consi Claw (kla), v.i. Naut. to beat to windward, and

to prevent falling on a lee shore or on an extre other vessel : with of ; hence, (fig.) to get roofi off; to escape. Claw - backt (kla bak), n. Lit. one who

greer

cleaclaws the back; one who flatters; a sycophant; a wheedler.

Mir. for Nags.
Claw-backt (kla'bak), a. Flattering. Bp.

ally Hall.

piece Claw - backt (kla'bak), v. t.

possi

To flatter. Warner.

thin

struc Clawed (kląd), a. Furnished with claws. rock Claw-hammer (klạ'ham-mér), n. A hammer so named from one end of it being Claydivided into two claws, for convenience of or fe drawing nails out of wood. Clawless (klales), a.

hard Destitute of claws. Clawsick (kla'sik), a. Suffering, as sheep,

сотр from foot-rot or claw-sickness.

com: Claw-sickness (kla'sik-nes), n. Foot-rot, a

yellc disease in cattle and sheep.

brow Claw - Wrench (kla'rensh), n.

Cleac

A wrench vinci having a loose pivoted jaw and a relatively cleac fixed one so arranged as to bite together when they are made to grip an object. Clay (klā), n. (A. Sax. clæg, Dan. klæg, L.G. klei, D. klai, klei, G. klei, clay. From a root

ing.

oute signifying to stick or adhere, seen also in cleave, to adhere, clue, clog, clot, glue, L. tive gluten.] 1. The name common to various hair viscous earths, compounds of silica and alu radia mina, sometimes with lime, magnesia, soda cove or potash, and metallic oxides. All the va

roof rieties are characterized by being Ormly coherent, weighty, compact, and hard when &c. dry, but stiff, viscid, and ductile when moist; smooth to the touch; not readily diffusible brig in water, and when mixed not readily sub Gae siding in it. They contract by heat. Clays bein absorb water greedily, and become soft, but 1. CI are so tenacious as to be moulded into any ness shape, and hence they are the materials of to tl bricks and tiles, pottery, &c. There are

2. F many varieties of clay used for different faul purposes, as pipe-clay, potter's clay, brick

gard clay, porcelain clay, &c. -2. In poetry and proc in Scrip. earth in general, especially as the shaj material of the human body. I also am formed out of the clay. Job xxxiii. 6.

T Their spirits conquered when their clay was cold.

3. Baillie. Kimmeridge clay, Oxford clay, Weald 4. F clay. See these terms in their alphabetical dext places.- Clay iron-ore, clay ironstone, one leap of the most valuable of the ferriferous rocks, from which iron is procured in great abun enti dance: It occurs chiefly in the coal-mea

thou sures of Scotland, Staffordshire, Shropshire, and Wales.

6. I Clay (klā), a. Formed or consisting of clay;

abo:

cam Clay (klă), v.t. 1. To cover or manure with clay. * The ground must be clayed again.'

mor Mortimer,- 2. To purify and whiten with

sinl clay, as sugar.-3. To puddle with clay.

him Clay-brained (klā'brand), a. Doltish; stu

Jn.

Built with clay. Clay - built (klā'bilt), a.

xii 'Clay-built cisterns. Dr. E. Darwin. ch, chain;

vinci ing;

berc

of a

Clea.

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CLAW

(klal'èr-ing-1), ade. With 2 One of the keys by means of which a playa

of carillons performs on the bells lent), . (L claudens, from Clavel, 1. See ClAyy. ut.) shutting: contining; Claveliated (klavel-låt-ed), a (LI dandi her; as, a claudent muscle. latus, from clarella, din of L cluce, a ciel

, re)

a billet of wood.) Relating to billets ls'di-kant), a. (See below.] wood.-Clavellated ashes, potash and pearl

Johnson. (Rare) ash, so termed from the billets or little clos la di-kát), vi [L claudico, from which they are obtained by burning claudus, lame.) To halt or Clavellinidæ (klar-el-lin’i-dė), A. N. (I

clavella, dim. of clara, a club, and Gr.ca kla-di-ki'shon), 1. A halt likeness.) A family of social ascidians

. Exd a limp. (Rare.)

individual has its own heart, respirabay Dracted a ... claudication in apparatus, and digestive organs; but each

Steck. is fixed on a footstalk that branches from pret. & pp. of an obsolete common creeping stem or stolon, thronel clache, to clutch. (Old

which a circulation takes place that confecta otch)

them all. They are so transparent that they k: het by the rump,

internal structure can be easily obserrel 324 karce a stimp.

Burrs.
They propagate both by ora and buds

.
Claveri (klå'ver), n. Člorer. "The dezert
.), The A catch; a hold; as, with sweet claver fills.' Sandys.
o'him (Scotch.) Claver (klá'ver), 0.1. (Allied to Dan. Hal
A. (Fr. clause, from L.L. to slander; G. klaffen, to chatter.! Totes
ausula, a conclusion, and as idly and foolishly; to talk much and a
itise, from claudo, clausum, random. (Scotch.]
gram, a member of a com-
containing both a subject pulpit.

As gude a man... as ever ye beard detersi

Str. 30 e-2. An article in a conTiting; a distinct part of a Claver (klá' vér), 1. 1. An idle story. greement, charter, commis 2. pl. Idie talk; gossip. (Scotch] a distinct stipulation, con I have kend mony chapmen neglect their rooss &c. In Scots law, certain carry clashes and davers up and down, from wat are expressed according to country-side to another.

So W.SK i forms, and are of several Claviceps (klav’i-seps), n. [L clara, a club of devolution, a clause de

caput, a head.) A genus of fungi. Called ce, obligation, or duty on a also Cordiceps. See CORDICEPS and ERGOT

, 2. O event, as, for example, ou Clavichord (klavi-kord), r. (L. claris,ales

, other to perform; clause of and chorda, a string.) Same as Claricheri by which the granter of a Clavicle (klavi-kl)

, n. (L. claricula, a liteke ticular distinction of it, and

key or fastener, from claris, a key or lock) a certain event it shall re

The collar-bone, forming one of the ele lauses irritant and resolu

ments of the pectoral arch in vertebrate sed for limiting the right animals. In man and sundry quadrupeds oprietor in entails. there are two clavicles or colar-bones

, *Z'rolz), n. pl. Same as each joined at one end to the scapada under CLOSE

or shoulder-bone, and at the other to the ral), a. (L. L claustralis, sternum or breast-bone. In many quadru 5, an inclosure, and in late

peds the clavicles are absent or rudimenim claudo, to shut ) I. Re

tary, while in birds they are united in ce? r; as, a claustral prior. piece, popularly called the 'merry-thought, embling a religious house clavicorn (klavi-korn), *h. A member ol Loister-like; secluded. the family Člavicornes.

er), a. (L. clausula. See Clavicornes(klav-i-kor'nēz), n. pl. [L dam, ng of or having clauses.

a club, and cornu, a horn.) "A family of per 1. A little clause. Bp. tamerous beetles, so named from the antenna

being thickened

at the apex so as to terminate , (L. clausura. See

in a club-shaped enlargement. The species t of shutting up or con. are partly terrestrial and partly aquatic

. (Rare)

The burying-beetles and bacon-beetles tazas

be regarded as examples. the severity of the clausure Dr. A. Geddes, Clavicular (kla-vik'u-ler), a. Pertaining to

the collar-bone or clavicle. sence of a perforation

j, job; ch, Sc. loch;

Burns.

us-3 + An inclosure. Clavier (klä'vi-ér) . (Fr. carier, from I Closely connected with clavis, a key.) In music, the key-board de and mass.) To rake or a pianoforte, organ, harmonium, or other Erns. (Scotch.)

instrument whose keys are arranged on the instrument for raking

same plan mire, weeds, &c. Claviform (klav'i-form), 2. {L dara, ed together; á hoard club, and forma, a shape.] Sarne as flaFlirty work or niggard

vate, 1.

Clavigert (klar'i.jér), n. 1. [L claris, a key, a claui o'siller.

and gero, to carry.) One who keeps the 16. (L. clava, a club.]

keys of any place. 2. (L. clara, a club, and

gero, to carry.) One who bears a club; 3 -nging to the division

club-bearer. having a fleshy sub- Clavigerous (kla-vijlėr-us)

, a. [See abore] t stem; club-shaped Bearing a key Clarke. are edible

Clavipalp (klavi-palp), 12. A member of ray-goat's

the family Člavipalpi Clavipalpi (klavi-pal-pi)

, 17. pl. [L clara a'vat, kla'.

a club, and palpi, feelers.) Same as Evo club; in

tylida. m clavus,

Clavis (kla'vis), n. {L., a ker.] That which cool. club

serves to unlock or explain any dificulty, of a club;

as a translation of a foreign author; or that er toward

which serves to explain a cipher; a key, rts of a

Clavula (klar'i-la)
, n. (L, dim. of elare

, anat, the

a club.] In bot. the receptacle of certain s of arti- Clavate.

fungi. IS.

Clavus (kla'rus), i. (L., a nail] The dis(L. clava, a club.]

ease produced in grains of rye and other ing to the division

gtasses when they are changed to a brown Lerized by bearing or blackish colour by the action of the

early je tip and sides of

state of the parasitical fungus Cordiceps haped receptacles. (Claviceps) purpurea. See ERGOT. . (See CLAVATE.) Clavy, Clavel (klavi, klarel), l. In arek.

a mantel-piece. ve. of stool used by

1

6, go;

Claw (kla), (A. Sar clawu, clt, a car
cog. D. Klaauw, a claw or paw, Icel. 16,

Dan. and Sw. klo, G. Klaue, a claw: proba-
Fr. clavecin, from

bly allied to cleace

, to adhere! . The . a key, and cym

sharp hooked nail of a quadruped, hird, or A harpsichord. other animal; or more generally, a booked tube, tub, bull;

oil, pound; ü, Sc, abune; , 8c ley.

[blocks in formation]

clear

car.

of per

of con

is al -To clear the land, is to gain such a dis clearness of views, of arguments, of explanj' sun. tance from shore as to have open sea room ations. 1 clear and be out of danger from the land. He does not know how to convey his thoughts to l; gay; To clear a ship for action, or to clear for

another with clearness and perspicuity. Addison. lothed action, is to remove all incumbrances from (e)t Plainness or plain dealing; sincerity; ii. 3. the decks and prepare for an engagement. honesty; fairness; candour. im the Clear (klēr), v.i. 1. To become free from

Their good faith and clearness of dealing made thing; clouds or fog; to become fair; to pass away them almost invincible.

Басол. . or disappear from the sky: often followed

(1) Freedom from imputation or suspicion by up, oj, or away; as, the mist clears off or

of ill. 'I require a clearners.' Shak. (9) In away.

painting, that peculiar quality in a picture ham.

So foul a sky dears not without a storm, Shak. which is realized by a skilful arrangement a) not

Advise him to stay till the weather clears up. Swift. of colours, tints, and tones, and for the sharp;

2. To be disengaged from incumbrances, satisfactory attainment of which a knowellect.

distress, or entanglements; to become free ledge of chiaroscuro is requisite. e from

or disengaged. Bacon. — 3. To exchange Clear-seeing (klēr'sē-ing), a. Having a

cheques and bills and settle balances, as is clear sight or understanding. Coleridge. cuous;

A L.

done in clearing-houses. See CLEARING, 1(c). Clear-sighted (klēr'sit-ed), a. Seeing with 4. Naut. to leave a port: often followed by clearness; having acuteness of mental dis

out or outwards; as, several vessels cleared cernment; discerning; perspicacious; as, nent of

yesterday; the ship will clear out or out clear-sighted reason; a clear-sighted judge. arke.

wards to-morrow. – To clear out, to take Judgment sits clear-sighted, and surveys

one's self off; to remove; to depart. (Colloq.] The chain of reason with unerring gaze. Thomson. ; un

Clearage (klēr'āj), n. The act of removing Clear-sightedness (klēr-sīt'ed-nes), n. The ty foe anything; clearance. (Rare.)

state or quality of being clear-sighted; acute any

Clearance (klēr'ans), n. 1. The act of clear discernment. are ol'

ing; as, the clearance of land from trees; clear-starch (klēr'stärch), v.t. To stiffen m the

the clearance of an estate from unprofitable and dress with clear or colourless starch; ton.

tenantry.-2. Clear or net profit. Trollope. ly un

as, to clear-starch muslin. 3. A certificate that a ship or vessel has hath

He took his lodgings at the mansion-house of a been cleared at the custom-house. — 4. In tailor's widow, who washes and can clear-starck his k. In steam - engines, the distance between the

bands.

Addison. piston and the cylinder-cover, when the for Clear-starcher (klēr'stärch-ér), n. One who I stir mer is at the end of its stroke.

clear - starches. Clean linen come home et. iii. 1.

Clear-cole (klér kol). See CLAIRE-COLE. from the clear-starcher's.' Dickens. arrass Clear-cut (klērkut), a. Formed with clear, Clear-story, Clere-story (klēr'sto-ri), n. ation, sharp, or delicately defined outlines, as it (Clear and story. It is uncertain whether lowed by cutting, as opposed to moulding. A the epithet clear is applied to the story on debts cold and clear-cut face. Tennyson.

account of the light admitted through its Clearedness (klērd'nes), n. The state or windows, or from its being clear of the roof quality of being cleared. Fuller. (Rare. ) of the aisles.) The upper story of a cathe

clearer (klér' ér), n. 1. One who or that Gay. which clears.-2. Naut. a tool on which the ction;

hemp is always finished for lines and twines

for sail-makers, &c. Hilison. Clear-headed (klēr'hed-ed), a. Having a dible; clear head or understanding. *This clearclear. headed, kind-hearted man.' Disraeli. n; in Clearing (klēr'ing), n. 1. The act of clearing;

as, (a) the act of freeing from anything; as,

the clearing of land. (6) The act of defend' wift. ing or vindicating one's selt. 2 Cor. vii. 11. al, as

(c) Among bankers, the act of exchanging koned

drafts on each other's houses and settling
the differences. A clerk from each estab.

lishment attends the clearing-house with only

the cheques and bills he may have on the at is,

others, and distributes them in drawers where

allotted to the several banks. They then

make out balance-sheets, entering on the near

one side the sum each bank owes them and ; not

on the other side the sum they owe each

bank. Clean;

Those who have money to receive entire

on balance take it indiscriminately from
those who have to pay, as it is evident the
sums to be paid must, in the aggregate,

equal the sums to be received. In railway text of

management, the act of distributing among wige.

the different companies the proceeds of the tever

through traffic passing over several rail. cy, or clear

ways. The necessary calculations are made

in the railway clearing-house in London. e sky.

2. A place or tract of land cleared of wood y, or

for cultivation: a common use of the word ns, to

in America.
Clearing-house (klēr'ing-hous), n. The

Part of Malmsbury Abbey. to the

place where the operation termed clearing A, Clear-story. B, Triforium. C, Arches of the Nave. den.

in banks and railways is carried on. See from CLEARING, 1 (c).

dral or other church, perforated by a range from Clearing-nut (klēr'ing-nut), n. The fruit

of windows, which form the principal means clear

of the Strychnos potatorum, used in the of lighting the central portions of the build.

East Indies for clearing muddy water. ing. It is immediately over the arches of To re

Clearly (klēr'li), adv. In a clear manner: the side aisles and the triforium, where a nen (a) plainly; evidently; fully; as, the fact is

triforium is present. Where there is no trition):

clearly proved. (6) Without obstruction; forium it rests immediately on the arches. ts; to

luminously; as, to shine clearly. (c) With Cleat (klēt), n. (Probably allied to G. klate, erate clear discernment; as, to understand clearly. debt, (d)t Without entanglement or confusion. the

He will never come out of it clearly.' icate; Bacon. (e)! Plainly; honestly; candidly, er the

Tillotson.) + Without reserve. Lin or

By a certain day, they should clearly relinquish
unto the king all their lands and possessions.

Sir 7. Davies.
Clearness (klēr'nes), n.

The state or qua-
1 year.
son. lity of being clear: (a) freedom from any.
ching thing that diminishes the brightness, trans-
litch; parency, or purity of colour of a thing; as,
ds. - the clearness of water or other liquor; clear-
con ness of skin. () Freedom from obstruction

1. Cleat. 2, Deck-cleat. 3. Thumb-clear. sail or incumbrance; as, the clearness of the nents, ground. (c) Discernment; perspicuity; as, klatte, a claw, or to D. klit, G, klette, a bur.) clear clearness of understanding (1) Distinct 1. A piece of wood or iron used in a ship to ouse. ness; perspicuity; luminousness; as, the fasten ropes upon.

It is formed with one

[graphic]

oceed

If; to

case.

es; to

s; to

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