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CLEAT land, is to gain such a dis- clearness of views, of arguments, of explzre as to have open sea room ations. danger from the land. He does not know how to convey les thao

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Tennyson.

lele arm or two, or with a hollow to receive a Cle rope, and is made fast to some part of a

Cle vessel. There are several kinds of cleats on

(SC board vessels; such as belaying-cleats, deckcleats, thumb-cleats. — 2. A piece of iron cle

tid worn on a shoe.-3. A piece of wood nailed

tin on transversely to a piece of joinery for the purpose of securing it in its proper position, or for strengthening.-4. A trunnion bracket on a gun-carriage. E. H. Knight.

of Cleat (klēt), v.t. To strengthen with a cleat

an or cleats.

SW Cleavable (klēv'a-bl), a. Capable of being

Sc cleaved or divided.

SW Cleavage (klēv'áj), n. 1. The act of cleaving

du or splitting; the act of separating or divid

Cle ing off.-2. In mineral. and geol. the man

clc ner in which substances regularly cleave

tu or split. It is used in relation to the frac

Cle ture of minerals which have natural joints and possess a regular structure. Certain

clo rocks, as slate-rocks in the strictest sense, may be cleaved into an indefinite number

ер of thin lamine which are parallel to each other, but which may be, but generally are

Cle not, parallel to the planes of the true strata

Cle or layers of deposition. Cleavage is the

CLE result of an operation which is subsequent

cle to, and entirely independent of the original

0. stratification of the rocks. In reference to

со mineral crystals cleavage is called basal,

cl cubic, diagonal, or lateral (or peritomous)

hc according as it is parallel to the base of a

Cle crystal, to the faces of a cube, to a diagonal

lii plane, or to the lateral planes.

ci cleave (klév), v. i. pret. clave or cleaved; pp.

al cleaved; ppr. cleaving. [A. Sax. clijan, cleo

Cle fian, pret. clifode, pp. clifod (cleaved is there

ch fore historically the correct pret. & pp.);

of cog. D. and L.G. kleven, Dan. klobe, G. kleben,

ti to adhere, to cleave. Climb is a nasalized

cl form akin to this.] 1. To stick; to adhere;

nd to be attached: used both in a literal and

th figurative sense. *If any blot hath cleaved to mine hands.' Job xxxi. 7. Who loved one only and who clave to her.' Tennyson. Let my tongue ceave to the roof of my mouth.

с For I cleaved to a cause that I felt to be pure and

Ps. cxxxvii. 6. true. 2. To unite aptly; to fit closely. (Rare.]

C

C1 New honours Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould

ST But with the aid of use.

I

Shak. Cleave (klēv), v.t. pret. clove or clave (the

C latter now archaic), also cleft; pp. cloven,

S S cleft or cleaved; ppr. cleaving. [A. Sax. cleofan, cleaf, clofen (the historically cor

2 rect conjugation is therefore cleave, clave or clove, cloven), to cleave or split; cog. D. kloven, Icel." kljúfa, Dan, klöve, G. klieben, This verb can hardly be connected with cleave, to adhere.] 1. To part or divide by

CY force; to split or rive; to sever forcibly; to

F hew; to cut; as, to cleave wood; to cleave a rock. 'Stands apart cleft from the main.'

t
Tennyson. 'Clove an advent to the throne.'
Tennyson.
His

heart was deft with pain and rage,
His cheeks they quivered, his eyes were wild.
When Abraham offered up his son,

Coleridge.
He clave the wood wherewith it inight be done.

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for action, or to clear for another with clearness and perspicuity. A tisa Dove all incumbrances from (e)t Plainness or plain dealing; sincerity: repare for an engagement. i 1. To become free from

honesty; fairness; candour, o become fair; to pass away

Their good faith and deamess of dealing ale

them almost invincible
Jm the sky: often followed
dy; as, the mist clears off or

(1) Freedom from imputation or suspicka
of ill

. 'I require a cleanea' Shak. (9) rs not without a storm. Skak.

painting, that peculiar quality in a pistere

which is realized by a skilful arrangement till the weather clears nep. Swift of colours, tints, and tones, and for the raged from incumbrances, satisfactory attainment of which 3 koor. nglements; to become free ledge of chiaroscuro is requisite

. Bacon. - 3. To exchange Clear-seeing (klēr'se-ing) Having a ls and settle balances, as is clear sight or understanding. Coleridge. -houses See CLEARING, 1 (C). Clear-sighted (klēr'slt-ed), 2. Seeing sith # a port: often followed by clearness; having acuteness of mental dit ; as, several vessels cleared cernment; discerning; perspicacious; 2, ship will clear out or out clear-sighted reason; a clear-sighted judge W. - To clear out, to take Judgment sits clear-sighted, and surveys emove; to depart. (Colloq.) The chain of reason with unerring gaze. Themat 1), 14 The act of removing Clear-sightedness (klēr-sited-nes) 2. The ace. [Rare)

state or quality of being clear-sighted; acute ins), n. 1. The act of clear discernment. rance of land from trees; Clear-starch (klēr'stärch), e.t. To stifen in estate from unprofitable and dress with clear or colourlesa starth: ar or net profit. Trollope. as, to clear-starch maslin. that a ship or vessel has

He took his lodgings at the mansice-house da the custom-house. - 4. In tailor's widow, who washes and can clear-Starch bis he distance between the bands linder-cover, when the for- Clear-starcher (klér’stärch-er), 11. One who of its stroke.

clenr-starches. Clean linen come home ol). See CLAIRE-COLE. from the clear-starcher's.' Dickene. 10), 4. Formed with clear, Clear-story, Clere-story (klērsto-si), ely defined outlines, as if (Clear and story. It is uncertain whether pposed to moulding. 'A the epithet clear is applied to the story ou Tace.' Tennyson. account of the light admitted through its rd'nes), n. The state or windows, or from its being clear of the rod leared. Fuller. (Rare.] of the aisles.) The upper story of a cathe

n. One who or that Vaut a tool on which the ished for lines and twines ērhed-ed), a. Having a erstanding. This cleared man.' Disraeli.

11. 1. The act of clearing; zeing from anything; as, 1 (6) The act of defendOne's selt. 2 Cor. vii. 11.

the act of exchanging er's houses and settling

clerk from each estabhe clearing-house with Is he may have on the ates them in drawers ral banks. They then meets, entering on the h bank owes them and e sum they owe each ave money to receive indiscriminately from y, as it is evident the st, in the aggregate, received. In railway of distributing among es the proceeds of the og over several rail. Calculations are made 3-house in London. land cleared of wood mon use of the word

Longfellow. He cleft me thro' the stomacher. Tennyson. Oh yet we trust.

That not a worin is cloven in vain. Ten tyson. 2. To part or open naturally. 'Every beast that parteth the hoof, and cleaveth the cleft into two claws.' Deut. xiv. 6.

С Cleave (klēv), v.i. To divide ; to split; to open: especially with a sudden and violent shock. Shal. Cleavelandite (klēv'land-it), n. [From Professor Cleaveland. ) A mineral of the felspar family, called also Siliceous Felspar or Albite. See ALBITE. Cleaver (klēv'er), n. 1. One who or that which cleaves. Specifically-2. A butcher's instrument for cutting carcasses into joints C or pieces. Cleavers, n. See CLIVERS. Cleché, ciechée(klā-shā), n. [Fr. cléché,_cléchée, from (hypoth.) L. clavicatus, from clavis, a key.) In her. a term applied to any ordinary voided or pierced throughout, and 50 much perforated that the chief substance is

Cross clechée.

C
taken from it, leaving
nothing visible but the edges. Thus a cross
clechée is a cross with the inside taken out,
leaving only an edge, and which is more
commonly blazoned a cross voided.

8. go;
ch, Sc. loch;
ch, chain;

(

'ing-hous), n. The

Part of Malmsbury Abbey. ion termed clearing A, Clear-story. B, Triforiun. C, Arches of the Nare. is carried on. See

dral or other church, perforated by a range -out), n. The fruit

of windows, which form the principal means Forum, used in the

of lighting the central portions of the build; muddy water.

ing. It is immediately over the arches of In a clear manner:

the side aisles and the triforium, where : wally; as, the fact is thout obstruction;

triforium is present. Where there is no tri

forium it rests immediately on the arches clearly. (c) With Cleat (klēt), 1h (Probably allied to G. klate, understand clearly. aent or confusion out of it clearly.' onestly; candidly.

reserve. ald dearly relinquish d possessions.

Sir 7. Davies, The state or quareedom from any

brightness, transur of a thing; as, her liquor; clear: from obstruction clearness of the

perspicuity; as, 8. (d) Distinct ousness; as,

1, Cleat. 2, Deck-cleat. 3, Thumb-clest, klatte, a claw, or to D. Hit, G. Hette, a bur) 1. A piece of wood or iron used in a ship to fasten ropes upon. It is formed with one

j, job;

, byll

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e, and

ty the

appeal. cording to the rules of any particular de Clerkly (klärk'li), a. 1. Pertaining to a clerk chery.' nomination of Christians. In England the or penmanship.

term is commonly restricted to ministers of At first in heart it liked me ill call or the Established Church.

When the king

praised his darkly skill. Shak. Cleric (kler'ik), n. A clergyman or scholar. Thanks to St. Bothan! son of mine, klepto, The cleric. addicted to a life of study

Save Gawain, ne'er could pen a line.

Sir W. Scott. An in and devotion.' Horsley.

2. Clerk-like; scholarly.
d, like
Cleric (klerik), a. Same as Clerical, 1.

Thou art clerkly, thou art clerkly,
Clerical (kler'ik-al), a. (L. clericus, Gr.

John. Skak. -m Gr. klērikos. See CLERGY and CLERK.) 1. Re- Clerkly (klärk'li), adv. In a scholarly man

Shak. lating or pertaining to the clergy; as, clerito de cal tonsure; clerical robes; clerical duties. Clerkship (klärk'ship), n. 1. A state of beime by 2. Relating to a clerk, writer, or copyist.

ing in holy orders. - 2. Scholarship. rones Clerical errors, errors made by a clerk or He was not averse to display his clerkship and king of by a transcriber.

scholastic information.

Lord Lytton. Clericalism (kler'ik-al-izm), n. Clerical 3. The office or business of a clerk or writer. power or influence, especially the undue Cleromancy (klē'ro-man-si or klero-man. influence of the clergy; sacerdotalism. si), n. (Gr. klèros, lot, and manteia, divina. Clericalism is well nigh fatal to Christianity.

tion.) A divination by throwing dice or Macmillan's Mag.

little bones, and observing the points or Clericity (kle-ris'i-ti),

n. The state of being marks turned up. a clergyman.. J.J.'G. Wilkinson. [Rare.] Cleronomy (klē-ron'o-mi), n. (Gr. klēros, Clerisy (kler'i-si), n. 1. A body of clerks or lot, and nomos, justice, law, custom.] That learned men; the literati.

which is given as his lot to any one; inThe clerisy of a nation, that is, its learned men, heritance; heritage or patrimony whether poets, philosophers, or scholars. Coleridge. Clethra (kleth'ra), n. [Gr. klēthra, alder, 2. The clergy, as opposed to the laity. [In

which these plants resemble in foliage) A both senses rare.]

genus of plants, nat. order Ericaceæ, natives Clerk (klärk), n. [A. Sax. cleric, clerc, a

of North and Tropical America. They are priest; 0. Fr. clerc; from L. clericus, Gr. klēri

shrubs or trees, with alternate serrate leaves kos. See CLERGY.) 1. A clergyman or ecclesi.

and many white flowers in terminal racemes. astic; a man in holy orders, especially in the

The corolla consists of five free petals. One Church of England. - 2. A man that can

species, C. alnifolia, a native of Virginia read; a man of letters; a scholar. (Archaic.]

and Carolina, is cultivated in this country,

and is one of the most beautiful flowering Church-ladders are not always mounted best By learned clerks and latinists professed.

shrubs. ydra,

Cowper:

Cleugh (klịch), n. (See CLOUGH.) A cleft 3. The layman who leads in reading the or gorge in a hill; a ravine; also, a cliff or

responses in the service of the Episcopal side of a ravine. [Scotch.] 1, rose Church. Hook. - 4. One who is employed in

Since old Buccleuch the name did gain, T. In an ifice public or private, or in a shop or

When in the clough the buck was ta'en. -ed by warehouse, for keeping records or accounts;

Sir W. Scott. to the

an officer attached to all courts, municipal Cleve (klēv), n. An old form of clif. Rom. d the and other corporations, societies, associa

ing on the clevis by the sea.' Chaucer. tions, &c., whose duty generally is to keep Clever (klevėr), a. (Perhaps a corruption nitted records of proceedings, and transact all busi

of 0. E. and Sc. deliver, active, light, nimble, coun ness under direction of the court, body, &c.,

but Wedgwood refers to dial. Dan. klöver, lle, on by whom he is employed; as, clerk of court;

klever, clever, which is against this suppois the town-clerk; clerk to a school-board, &c. See

sition. More probably connected with 0.E. hemi SECRETARY.-5. In America, an assistant in

cliver, a claw, and cleave, to adhere.) 1. Perthe shop of a retail dealer, part of whose

forming or acting with skill or address; hav. See duties is usually the keeping of accounts;

ing the art of doing or devising anything a shopman.- Clerk of the assize, the person

readily; possessing ability of any kind, espech and who writes all things judicially done by the

cially such as involves quickness of intellect cold. justices of assize in their circuits. -Clerk of

or mechanical dexterity. 'A clever pen.' clere

Addison.
the House of Commons, an officer appointed
by the crown to make entries, remem-

Though there were many clever men in England

during the latter half of the seventeenth century, -. See brances, and journals of the things done there were only two great creative minds. and passed in the House of Commons.

Maarulay. k-al),

Clerke of the crown, in Chancery, an officer 2. Indicative of or exhibiting cleverness: said Erkly.

of the crown in attendance upon both of things; as, a clever speech; a clever trick. houses of parliament and upon the great 3. Fit; suitable; convenient; proper; commoseal. In the House of Lords he makes out

dious. * These clever apartments.' Cowper. nto a and issues all writs of summons to peers,

[In this sense obsolete or provincial.) -writs for the attendance of the judges, com 4. Well-shaped; active-looking: tight; handces.

missions to summon and prorogue parlia some. [Provincial. )-5. In New England,

ment, and to pass bills,and performs various good-natured : possessing an agreeable mind pier.

other duties. In connection with the Com or disposition. - SYN. Dexterous, adroit, Cister

mons he makes out and issues all writs for ready, skilful, neat - handed, ingenious,

the election of members in Great Britain, knowing, discerning, smart, witty, sharp, yere &c.-Clerk of enrolments, an officer who has

able. ed as

custody of bills passed by both houses of Cleverality (klev-ér-al'i-ti), n. Cleverness;

parliament for the purpose of obtaining the smartness. (A jocular term.] , Gr. ēros, royal assent.

Sir E. May.-Clerk of justi Sheridan was clever; scamps often are; but John. ciary, the clerk of the Court of Justiciary

son had not a spark of cleverality in him. some

Charlotte Bronté. lot.)

There are a principal and depute-clerk and
an assistant whose duty it is to attend the

Cleverish (klev'ér-ish), a. Tolerably clever. bnse

Lord Lytton. ce of

sittings of the Justiciary Court in Edin-
burgh, to keep the books of adjournal, and

Cleverly (klev'er-li), adv. In a clever manaity. to write out the interlocutors and sentences

ner; dexterously; skilfully; ably, of the court.-Clerk in orders, in the Church

Cleverly (klev'er-li), a. Well in health: of England, a licensed clergyman. -Clerk

used in New England in answer to the salutitled of the parliaments, the chief officer of the

tation, How do you do? Haliburton. House of Lords.-Clerk of the peace, an offi

Cleverness (klev'er-nes), n. 1. The quality the cer belonging to the sessions of the peace,

of being clever; dexterity; adroitness; skill; from whose business is to read indictments and

ingenuity; smartness. ; or record the proceedings, and perform a num.

Cleverness is a sort of genius for instrumentality.

It is the brain of the hand. In literature, cleverness n in ber of special duties in connection with

is more frequently accompanied by wit . . . than by brdi. county affairs.-Clerk of the session, the title humour,

Coleridge. anogiven to the cler

Cou of Session.

2. In New England, mildness or agreeableim Clerk to the signet. See SIGNET. -A St. ness of disposition; obligingness ; good naquel

Nicholas' clerk, a thief; a highwayman. ture. - Genius, Wisdorn, Abilities, Talents, men Sirrah, if they meet not with Saint Nicholas' clerks, Parts, Ingenuity, Capacity, Cleverness. See

Shak. d by I'll give thee this neck.

under GENIUS. 1513, Clerk-ale,t Clerk's-alet (klärk'ál, klärks'. Clevis (klev'is), n. Same as Clevy. by 7 äl), n. In England, a feast for the beneft Clevy (klev'i), n. [From the root of cleave; nce. . of the parish clerk. T. Warton.

comp, Icel. klofi, a forked stick.) An iron 0 or Clerkless (klärk'les), a. Ignorant; unlearned. bent to the form of a stirrup, with the two TgyWaterhouse. (Rare.)

ends perforated to receive a pin, tised to ack- Clerk-like (klärk'lik), a. Like a clerk; connect a draft-chain or tree to a cart or

scholar-like; learned. A gentleman, clerk plough. (Provincial English and American.) holy like, experienced.' Shak.

Clew, n, or v.t. See CLUE. rach | Clerkliness (klärk’li-nes), n. Clerkly skill; Chanthus (kli-an'thus), n. (Gr. kleios, glory, ac scholarliness. Latimer. (Rare.]

and anthos, a flower,]' A genus of plants,

inte.

ly of

one.

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rules of any particular de Clerkly (klärkli)

, a. 1. Pertaining to a da Christians In England the or penmanship tly restricted to ministers of At first in heart it liked me il I Church

When the king praised his deekly skł IL A clergyman or scholar.

Thanks to St. Bothan! son of mist,
addicted to a life of study

Save Gawain, ne'er could per a ine.
Horsley.

Sir R.SE
Same as Clerical, 1.

2. Clerk-like; scholarly. k-al) a (I clericus, Gr.

Thou art derkly, thou art derkly, Sir John Stat LERGY and CLERK.) i Re Clerkly (klärkli), adv. In a scholarly me ning to the clergy: As, cleri

ner. Shak. ical robes; clerical duties. - Clerkship (klärk’ship), n. 1. A state de 1 clerk, writer, or copyist. -ing in holy orders. – 2. Scholarship. errors made by a clerk or He was not averse to display his corbsky

scholastic information.

Land Lyitan. er'ik-al-izm), n. Clerical

3. The office or business of a clerk of writa. ?nce, especially the undue Cleromancy (klė'ro-man-si or klero-masclergy; sacerdotalism. si), 2 (Gr. kléros, lot, and manteia, divina. suga fatal to Christianity.

tion.) A divination by throwing dia a Macmillan's Mag:

little bones, and observing the points ir Yi-t1), Th. The state of being marks turned up.

J. G. Wilkinson (Rare.] Cleronomy (klē-ron'o-mi), n. Gr. kldrar, ), Rt 1. A body of clerks or lot, and nonos, justice, law, custom.) That e literati.

which is given as his lot to any ole; irnation, that is, its learned men, heritance; heritage or patrimony sphers, or scholars. Coleridge Clethra (kleth'ra), 1h. Gr. klētkra

, alder, opposed to the laity. [In

which these plants resemble in foliage) d )

genus of plants, nat. onder Ericacea, Datires (A Sax. cleric, clere, a

of North and Tropical America. They are ; from L clericus, Gr. kleri

shrubs or trees, with alternate sertate leaves 1 1 A clergyman or ecclesi.

and many white flowers in terminal racement

The corolla consists of fire free petals one ly orders, especially in the nd. -2. A man that can

species, C. alnifolia, a native of Virginia ters; a scholar. (Archaic.]

and Carolina, is cultivated in this country,

and is one of the most beautiful flowering are not always mounted best

shrubs. ' and Latinists professed.

Cowper Cleugh (klych), n. [See CLOUGH.) A cleft ho leads in reading the or gorge in a hill; a ravine; also, a clift or service of the Episcopal side of a ravine. (Scotch]

One who is employed in Since old Buccleuch the name did gain, r private, or in a shop or When in the daugh the buck was ta’en. ping records or accounts;

iuty generally is to keep of 0. E. and Sc, deliter, active, light, nimbit

Sir W. Scott i to all courts, municipal cleve (klēv), n. An old form of elig. Kom ations, societies, associa- ing on the clevis by the sea Chaucer.

Clever (klev'er), a. (Perhaps a corrupthin ngs, and transact all busin of the court, body, &c.,

but Wedgwood refers to dial. Dan. Klärer, loyed; as, clerk of court kleder, clever, which is against this suppora school-board, &c. See

sition. More probably connected with 0 E America, an assistant in

clider, a claw, and cleave, to adhere.) 1. Per. al dealer, part of whose

forming or acting with skill or address; harne keeping of accounts; readily; possessing ability of any kind

, este ing the art of doing or devising anything of the assize, the

person s judicially done by the

cially such as involves quickness of intellect their circuits. - Clerk of

or mechanical dexterity. 'A clever ren.' nus, an officer appointed

Addison. make entries, remem

Though there were many caer men in England

during the latter half the serehteenth center, als of the things done there were only two great creative minds

, House of Commons

Vacsies in Chancery, an officer 2. Indicative of or exhibiting cleveriess: said ttendance upon both of things; 29, a clever speech; a clerer trick t and upon the great

3. Fit; suitable; convenient; proper; com noof Lords he makes out dious. These cleter apartments Coteger of summons to peers,

[In this sense obsolete or provincial)-ce of the judges, com

4. Well-shaped; active-looking: tight; handand prorogue parlia some. (Provincial)-5. In New England, and performs various / good-natured; possessing an agreeable mind nection with the Com or disposition. --Syn. Dexterous, adroit, od issties all writs for ready, skilful, peat-handed, ingenious, ers in Great Britain, knowing, discerning, smart, witty, sharp, ats, an officer who has

able, d by both houses of Cleverality (kler-er-al'i-ti), n. Cleverness; pose of obtaining the smartness." (A jocular term) Vay.--Clerk of justi Sheridan was clever; scamps often are; but Jolge Court of Justiciary, son had not a spark of drunality in him. nd depute-clerk and Cleverish (kler'er-ish)

, a. Tolerably clerer. y it is to attend the

Lord Lytton, ary Court in Edin.

ner; dexterously; skilfully; ably: cutors and sentences

Charlete Brent

sions of the peace; ingenuity; smartness.

as of adjournal,

and Cleverly (klever-li), adv. In a clever manrders

, in the Church Cleverly (klevér-li), a well in health: clergyman - Clerk

used in New England in answer to the saluchief officer of the Cleverness (klevér-nes)

, 2. 1. The quality tation, How do you do? Haliburton. the peace, an offi.

of being clever; dexterity; adroitness; skill; d indictments and und perform a num

Cleverness is a sort of genius for instrumentality. connection with

It is the brain of the hand. In literature, carrers he session, the title

is more frequently accompanied by wit : , than by humour.

Coloring - Court of Session.

2. In New England, mildness or agreeableee SIGNET.-A Se. highwayman.

ness of disposition; obligingness; god neture. Genius, Wisdon, Abilities, Talents

, 2pnt Nicholas' derks,

Parts, Ingenuity, Capacity, Cleverness. See Shal.

under GENIUS (klárk'ál, klärks'. Clevis (klev'is), 1. Same as Clery at for the benefit Clevy (klevi), n. {From the root of clearr; arton.

comp. Icel. klopi

, a forked stick.) An iron orant; unlearned. bent to the form of a stirrup, with the two

ends perforated to receive a pin, used to Like a clerk;

connect a draft-chain or tree to a cart of gentleman, clerk plough. (Provincial English and American)

Clew, n. or v. See CLUE. .: Clerkly skill; Clianthus (kli-an'thus), n (Gr. kleios

, glory, Rare

and anthos, a flower.) A genus of plants,

CLICH

the very

the tyr

the ste

late p

some

nat. order Leguminosae, found in Austral- Clients

of a clt asia. They are shrubs, with large handsome

tection flowers in racemes. The C. puniceus is a very elegant plant with crimson flowers; it Cliff, C

cliff; c attains the height of 8 or 10 feet. It is a

klif, a native of New Zealand, where it is called

klippe, parrot's-bill, from the resemblance of the

with ct keeled petal to the bill of that bird. Clich (Klich), 1z.

wrong, A broad-bladed Turkish

adhere sabre.

suggest Cliché (klē-shá), n. (Fr., from clicher, to

a'clim stereotype, from an older form cliquer, to

and ru fasten, to make firm, from the root of clinch,

rock; clench (omitting the nasal).) 1. A stereotype plate, especially one derived from an en Cliff (kl graving. — 2. In photog. a negative picture. Cliffy ( -Cliché casting, a mode of obtaining a cast

Vecta from a woodcut for printing, by striking Dover. the woodcut suddenly and perpendicularly Clift (ke down on fused metal as it is becoming solid,

2. A c. and using the mould thus obtained to give rocky a cast in type-metal..

It she Clichy-white (klė'shi-whit), n. A pure whitelead manufactured at Clichy in France. Click (klik), v.i. (An imitative word ex [In the pressing a slighter sound than clack; comp. clack, cluck, clink, clank; D. klikken, Fr.

gownd cliquer, to click.) To make a small sharp ciiftt sound, or a succession of small sharp sounds, clifted as by a gentle striking; to tick.

Clifty The solemn death-watch clicked. Gay. CLIFT, Click (klik), v. t. To move with a clicking cliketi sound. When merry milkmaids click the | Climac latch.

Tennyson,
She clicked back the bolt which held the window.

or Sca sash.

Thackeray, (which Click (klik), n. (From sound. See verb.)

Climac 1. A small sharp sound. • The Iclick of a

a clim watch.' Worcester, 2. The cluck of the

macte natives of South Africa See CLUCK.-3. A

Climac small piece of mechanism which enters the

a. Per teeth of a ratchet-wheel; a detent or ratchet.

teethin 4. The latch of a door. (Local.] Click (klik), v. t. [Equivalent to Sc. cleek,

sixty-t cleik, and closely allied to clutch.) Το

noun. spatch; to clutch; as, he clicked it out o'my

Climac hands. [Northern English.]

n. (Se Click-beetle (klik'bê-tl), n. See ELATER period

ID.E.
Clicker (klik'ér), n. 1. The servant of a

in the salesman, who stands at the door to invite

period customers. [Vulgar. 1-2. In shoemaking, a

years cutter out of leather for the uppers and soles of boots and shoes.-3. In printing,

add th the compositor who receives the copy and distributes it among the other compositors,

suppos makes up the pages, and sets up head-lines,

with s &c.

health Clicket (klik'et), n. [0. Fr. cliquet, a latch.] Climac 1. The knocker of a door.-2. A latch-key.

Same B. Jonson.-3. The latch of a door. (Obso. Climat lete or provincial in all the senses.)

climat cliency (kličen-si), n. The state or condi.

Climat tion of a client. Goodrich.

climat Client (kli'ent), n. (L. cliens, clientis, a client, from 0.L. cluo, to hear.] 1. In Rom.

Climat antiq. a citizen who put himself under the

klimat protection of a man of distinction and influence, who, in respect to that relation, was

from called his patron. Hence-2. In a general

geog. a sense, one whose interests are represented

by lin by another.

thirty The prince being at Brussels, humbly hesought his

and t majesty to pity the misery of his poor subjects: who

Shak. by his suit gat of the emperor, for his clients, words in rela without hope.

Ascham. atmos Specifically--3. One who applies to a lawyer miasmr for advice and direction in a question of law, or commits his cause to his manage climat ment in prosecuting a claim or defending of Gre against a suit in a court of justice. Advocates must deal plainly with their clients.

Clima

Fer. Taylor. in a p Clientage (kli'ent-aj), n. 1. The state or con mate dition of being a client.–2. A body of clients Clima or retainers.

ik-al). Cliental (kli'ent-al), a. 1. Pertaining to a

mates client or clients.

divisi I sat down in the cliental chair, placed over against Clima Mr. Jagger's chair.

Dickens. uring 2. Dependent. 'A dependent and cliental [Rare. relation.' Burke. [In both uses rare.) Clima Cliented (kli'ent-ed), a.

matiz

Supplied with clients. The least cliented pettifoggers.'

Clima Rich. Carew. (Rare.)

custo Clientelage (kli-ent' el-āj), n. (See CLIEN

acclir TELE.) A body of clients or dependents.

foreig Clientelary (kli-en-tel'a-ri), a. Pertaining

Clima to clients. Clientelary right.' Prynne.

Belon Clientele (kli'en-tél), n. (Fr. clientèle, L.

the va clientela, clientship, clients collectively.]

Clima 1. The condition or relation of a client.

klimat Under the pretext of clientele.' B. Jonson.

descri 2. One's clients collectively.

8, go; Ch, Sc. loci; ch, chain;

odd nu

the gr

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life o

meani

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2 is fastened and furnaces. - 4. Vitrified or burnt matter coin. Clipped silver.' Macaulay. --3. To of knot and thrown up by a volcano.-5. A scale of black curtail; to cut short, as words; to pronounce to the ring oxide of iron, formed when iron is heated shortly and indistinctly. To clip the divine of a gun to to redness in the open air.

prerogative.' South. Clinker-bar (klingk'ér-bär), n. In steam Mrs. Mayoress clipped the king's English. Addison. vho or that engines, the bar fixed across the top of the ece of iron ash-pit for supporting the rods used for

47 To embrace; to enfold; to surround. g. -2. That clearing the fire-bars.

The lusty vinef's) not jealous of the ivy

Because she clips the elm. Beau, & F2. ally, a retort Clinker-built, a. See CLINCHER-BUILT.

Where is he living clipp'd in with the sea ontroversy; Clink-stone (klingk'ston), n. (Clink and Who calls me pupil ?

Shak. stone, from its sonorousness. See PHONO(klinsh'er

-To clip the wings, lit. to cut a bird's wings LITE.) A felspathic rock of the trachytic of clincher

short so as to deprive it of the power of flight; group; it has a slaty structure, and is

fig. to put a check on one's ambition; to render generally divisible into tabular masses of

one less able to execute his schemes or realize - (klinsh'ér

greater or less thickness, which are somerip-building,

his aspirations. times used as roofing slates. Its colours the side of are dark greenish-gray, yellowish, bluish,

But love had clipped his wings and cut him short.

Dryden. ver edge of

or ash gray; and it is usually translucent clip, (klip), v.i. In falconry, to fly swiftly: edge of the at the edges, sometimes opaque.

with an indefinite it. 'Clips it down the ne roof of a

Clinkumbeú (klingk'um-bel), n. A bell wind.' Dryden.

man. Burns. (Scotch; humorous. ] clung; ppr.

Clip (klip), n. 1. An embrace. Not used to Clinodiagonal (kli'no-di-ag'on-al), n. (Gr. frozen clips.' Sir P. Sidney.-2. The quantity adhere, to

klino, to incline,and E.diagonal.] In crystal. of wool shorn at a single shearing of sheep; a to grow in that diagonal or lateral axis in monoclinic

season's shearing.-3. A blow or stroke with er.) To ad

crystals which forms an oblique angle with the hand; as, he hit him a clip. (Colloq.!fast, espe the vertical axis.

4. In farriery, a projecting flange on the racing: fol

Clinodiagonal (kli'no-di-ag'on-al), a. Pervine clings

uppersurface of a horse-shoe

which partially taining to or in the direction of the clino embraces the wall of the hoof.-5. A clasp love close diagonal.

or spring-holder for letters or papers. Clinographic (klī-no-graf'ik), n. (Gr. klino, 6. pl. Shears. Burns. (Scotch.] Hdly clotxg to incline, and graphô, to write or draw.] Clipper (klip'er), n. 1. One who clips; espetheir pride. Pertaining to that mode of projection in cially, one who cuts off the edges of coin. Browning 1. To pinch

drawing in which the rays of light are sup The value is pared off from it into the clipper's

posed to fall obliquely on the plane of pros; to shrivel.

pocket.

Locke. jection.

2. A vessel with sharp, forward-raking bows Clinoid (klīn'oid), a. (Gr. klinē, a bed, and

and masts raking aft, built and rigged (as eidos, resemblance.] In anat. a term applied Shak.

ship, barque, or schooner) with a view to to designate the four processes surrounding

fast sailing. Hence—3. A person or animal the sella-turcica of the sphenoid bone, from

that runs swiftly, or looks as if capable of as I could. their resemblance to the knobs of a bedstead.

running swiftly; a very smart person; someSwift. Clinometer (kli-nom'et-ér), n. [Gr. klino, to variety of

thing first-rate. (Colloq.] lean, and metron, measure.) An instrument sely to the for measuring the dip of rock-strata.

I never saw your equal, and I've met some clippers in my time.

Thackeray. Clinometric, clinometrical (kli-no-met'. -; adhesive.

Naut. rik, kli-no-met'rik-al), a. 1. Of or pertaining Clipper-built (klip'er- bilt), a.

built after the type of a clipper. to a clinometer; ascertained or determined ical.

by a clinometer. 2. Pertaining to oblique Clipp-fish (klip'ish), n. (Dan. klipfisk.) Fish, ined to the crystalline forms or to solids which have

chietly cod, split open, salted, and dried. ne who re

Consular Report. oblique angles between the axes; as, clino. Hook. metric crystals.

Clipping (klip'ing), p. and a. 1. Embracing;

"Now runs and Clinometry (kli-nom'et-ri), n.

encircling with the arms.

In geol. the Enikos, from method or art of measuring the dip of rock

takes her in his clipping arms.? Sir P. - See LEAN.) strata.

Sidney. -2. Swift; as, a clipping pace, ially a sick. Clinquant (klingk'ant), n. (Fr., from D.

[ Colloq. 1-3. Smart; showy; first-rate. scourse de klinken, to clink, from sound. Comp. G.

[Colloq.) ck, or from

ranschgold, tinsel (rauschen, to rustle or What clipping girls there were in that barouche. a physician, crackle). I 1. A glittering alloy; Dutch gold. Clipping (klip'ing), n. 1. The act of cutting

Cornhill Magasine. tion in the

2. + Tinsel; false glitter. er medicine

off. -2. That which is clipped off; a piece Clinquantt (klingk'ant), a. [Fr. See above.] dical art in

separated by clipping. Decked with tinsel

*The clippings of the student

our beards and parings of our nails.* Locke. finery; glittering Aside of the

3. The act of embracing. 'A clinquant petticonvert on coat of some rich

Clipping-time (klip'ing-tim), n. [Scotch.) em, private stuff.' Beau. & Fl.

The time of sheep-shearing; the nick of uch to sick

time. — To come in clipping-time, to come Clio (klio), n. 1. In myth. the muse

as opportunely as he who visits a sheepIn a clinical who was supposed

farmer at sheep-shearing time, when there to preside over

is always mirth and good cheer. Sir W.

Scott. mique. See

history. She is nation of a usually represent

Clipsy (klip'si), a. As if eclipsed. "Now ence of his ed with a scroll in

bright, now clipsy.' Romaunt of the Rose. her hand, and also

Clique (klēk), n. (Fr. clique, probably a et. same as sometimes with a

mere variant of claque, with a somewhat

different sense. case to keep MSS.

See CLAQUE.) A party; a ive word, a in by her side.

set; a coterie: used generally in a bad sense. click, and 2. An asteroid dis

Mind, I don't call the London exclusive clique the sound than covered by Hind in

best English society.

Coleridge. 1, to tinkle; 1850.-3. A genus

Cliquish (klēk'ish), a. Relating to a clique cel.klingja, of pteropodous

or party; disposed to form cliques; having to ring, to molluscs, of which

a petty party spirit. Co utter or one species, C. bo

Cliquishness (klēk'ish-nes), n. The state succession realis, is extreme- Clio.-Antique statue, Villa

or quality of being cliquish; inclination or all metallic ly abundant in

Borghese, Rome. disposition to form cliques; tendency to her. -2. To the northern seas,

form cliques; cliquism. constituting the principal part of the food Cliquism (klék'izm), n. The principles or e Swift.

of the whale, and hence called whale's food spirit of a clique; cliquishness.
by the whale-fishers.

Clish-clash (klish'klash), v.i. (A redupliproduce a

Clionidæ (kli-on'i-dē), n. pl. (See CLIO.] A cation of clash.) To sound like the clash.

family of naked marine molluscs, placed by ing of swords. und made

‘The weapons clish-clash.' Cuvier as the first of his class Pteropoda,

Mir. for Mags. dies. • The and having for its type the genus Clio.

Clish-clash (klish'klash), n. 5. A clinch;

Silly talk; Clip (klip), v. t. pret. &pp. clipped, clipt; ppr. palaver; gossip; scandal.” (Scotch.) clipping. [In first three meanings same as Clishmaclash (klish'ma-klash), n.

Clishcet's clink

Icel. Iclippa, to clip, to cut the hair; Dan. clash; clishmaclaver. [Scotch.) k. Spenser.

Iclippe, Sw. klippa, to clip or shear; in Clishmaclaver (klish ma- klá - vér), n Link on the fourth from A. Sax. clyppan, to clasp, to Idle discourse; silly talk; gossip. Burns. -4. Money. embrace, which is from same root, and pro

[Scotch.] bably allied to cleave to adhere, and to climb.j Clitch + (klich), v.t. To catch; to clutch. LINQUANT. 1. To cut off or sever with shears or scissors; He hath an earthen pot wherewith to click up tially vitrito trim or make shorter with scissors; as,

Halland. A kind of to clip the hair; to clip a bird's

wings. Clip Clitoria (kli-to'ri-a), n. (Clitoris (which see), ed for payping papers or darning his stockings." Swift

. in reference to the shape of the flowers. ) of incom * Arbours clipt and cut.' Tennyson.-2. To A genus of plants, nat. order Leguminose, s in grates diminish by paring the edge; as, to clip found throughout the tropics of both worlds.

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CLITORIS

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CLITORIA
Vitrified or burnt matter
aleano.-5. A scale of black

coin. Clipped silver.' Maaralay. – 21

curtail; to cut short, as worla; u preostane med when iron is heated shortly and indistinctly

. 'To clip the dires open air.

prerogative South
ek'er-bär), 2. In steam-
ised across the top of the

Mrs. Mayoress clipped the king's English Aetium trting the rods used for

41 To embrace; to enfold; to surround

The lusty vinc's) not jealous of the in
See CLINCHER-BUILT

Because she dips the en. bera, A

Where is he living din d'in with tie sa ngk'stón), 14. [Clink and

Who calls me pupil? boroneness See PHONOhie rock of the trachytic short so as to deprive it of the powerdiet

- To clip the wings, lit. to cut a bird's visa slaty structure, and is e into tabular masses of

fig. to put a check on one's ambition; treoda

one less able to execute his schemos rralis ickness, which are someting slates. Its colours

his aspirations. !-gray, yellowish, bluish,

But love had difped his wings and cathiasort i is usually translucent clip (klip), v.i. In falconry

, to fly swity

Dres times opaque.

with an indefinite it. 'Clips it down the agk'um-bel), n. A bell.

wind.' Dryden.
otch; humorous]
i'no-di-ag'on-al), n. (Gr.

Clip (klip), n. 1.7 An embrace. 'Nated to

frozen clips.' SirP. Sidney. Thequatiri 1 E.diagonal] In crystal. of wool shorn at a single shearing of ebepia ateral axis in monoclinic

season's shearing.–3. A blow or strake vith ns an oblique angle with the hand; as, he hit him a dip. (Colloq.

4. In farriery, a projecting fange on the 'no-di-age"on-al), a. Per

upper surface of a horse-shoe whică partial le direction of the clino

embraces the wall of the hoof.- Achiep

or spring-holder for letters of paper 10-grafik), n (Gr. klino, 6. pl. Shears. Burns. [Scotch.). phă, to write or draw.] clipper (klip'er)

, n. 1. One who clips; esc mode of projection in cially, one who cuts off the edges of cain

. he rays of light are sup

The value is pared of from it into the digger's tely on the plane of pro pocket

Lady 2. A vessel with sharp, forward-raking boss (Gr. kline, a bed, and

and masts raking aft, built and rigged (as In onat a term applied

ship, barque, or schooner) with a view to I processes surrounding

fast sailing, Hence-3. A person or animal the sphenoid bone, from

that runs swiftly, or looks as if capable or the knobs of a bedstead.

running swiftly; a very smart person; Scala n'et-ér), 1. [Gr. klino, to

thing first-rate. (Colloq.) easure) An instrument

I never saw your equal

, and I've beet sare differs ip of rock-strata in my time.

The bay. metrical (kli-no-met), 4. 1. Of or pertaining Clipper - built (klip' ér - bilt)

, a route built after the type of a clipper. ertained or determined Pertaining to oblique chietty cod, split open, salted, and dzisi

Clipp-fish (klip'ish)

, 9. (Dan. klinkek)

Fish

, to solids which have

Consular Report den the ares; as, clino

Clipping (klip'ing), p. anda. 1.4 Endrada;

encircling with the arms. "Now runs an! et-ri), 1h. In geol. the

takes her in his clipping arms.' Sér P. suring the dip of rock

Sidney. -- 2. Swift; as, a diyping pece

(Colloq. ) 3. Smart; showy; first-rate t), n (Fr., from D.

(Colloq.] tu sound. Comp. G. uschen, to rustle or

Cornbill Nigaret ng alloy; Datch gold. Clipping (klip'ing), on 1. The act of cutting

off. -2. That which is clipped off; a piece .. (Fr. See above.]

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3. The numerous species are climbing, rarely

hou erect, herbs, with large blue, white, or red

lon flowers. Several species are in cultivation.

ph Clitoris (kli'to-ris), n. [Gr. kleitoris, from kleió, to inclose or hide.] In anat. a small elongated organ of the female pudendum, concealed by the labia majora.

Ad Clitter-clatter (klit'tėr-klat'tér), n. [Re

As: duplicated from clatter on the same prin

mo ciple as clish-clash, tittle-tattle, &c.) Pa

on laver; idle talk; a chattering noise.

by Such were his writings; but his chatter Was one continued clilter-clatter. Swift. Clo

En Clivers, Cleavers (kliv'érz, klēv' érz), n. [From its cleaving or clinging to the clothes. ] Clo

chi A plant, Galium Aparine, called also Goosegrass.

po It has a square, rough, jointed

clo stem; the joints hairy at the base, with eight or ten narrow leaves at each joint.

Clo clivity (kliv'i-ti), n. [L. clivus.) A declivity; to a gradient. (Rare.)

flo Cloaca. (klo-a’ka), n. [L., a common sewer.) 1. An underground conduit for drainage; a асс common sewer; as, the cloaca maxima at to Rome.-2. A sink; a privy.-3. The excre.

drd mentory cavity in birds, reptiles, many

Clo fishes, and lower mammalia, formed by the

AL extremity of the intestinal canal, and which Clo receives the fæces and the urine, together

al with the genital products. -4. In pathol.

th the opening in cases of necrosis or mortifica Clo tion of the bones, leading to the inclosed dead bone.

Clo Cloacal (klo-a'kal), a. Pertaining to a cloaca. ad In the torpedo the ureters terminate in the cloacal

Clo papilla by two distinct orifices.

Prof. Owen, wl Cloak (klok), n. [O. and Prov. Fr. cloque,

Clo L. L. cloca, clocca, a bell, a kind of horseman's

re cape of a bell-shape; really same as clock

Sle (which see). ] 1. A loose outer garment

Cla worn over other clothes both by men and ap women.-2. That which conceals; a disguise

us or pretext; an excuse; a fair pretence.

frd Formerly written also Cloke.

wi Not using your liberty for a cloke of maliciousness,

Clc 1 Pet. ii. 16.

in Cloak (klok), v.t. 1. To cover with a cloak. – 2. To hide; to conceal. To cloak cic her crimes.' Spenser. -SYN. To hide, con

fo: ceal, mask, cover, veil, screen. Cloakage (klõk'āj), n. The act of covering clc with a cloak. J. Martineau. (Rare.]

cl Cloak-bag (klok'bag), n.

cic

A bag in which a cloak or other clothes are carried; a portmanteau. Stuffed cloak-bag.' Shak.

ch Cloakedly (klok'ed-li), adv. In a cloaked m or concealed manner. Bp. Burnet. (Rare.] Cloaking (klok'ing), n. I The act of covering with or as with a cloak.-2. A woollen

Clc material for making cloaks.

cl Cloak-room (klõk'röm), n. A room attached

or to any place of general resort, as railway.

or station, assembly-rooms, opera-house, &c., where ladies' cloaks, &c., are deposited. Cloath + (kloth), n. Cloth. Quarles.

2. Clobbed, t a. Like a club; clubbed. "Grete

lu clobbed staves.' Chaucer. Clobber (klob'ber), n. [Probably from the

cle Celtic; Comp. Ir. clabar, mud.) A kind of

3. coarse paste made of ground cinders and flour, used to conceal the breaks of the leather of cobbled-up shoes. Dickens. Clobberer (klob'bér-ér), n. A cobbler of the lowest class, who patches up old shoes, and

4. conceals their defects by rubbing clobber into the breaks of the leather.

bc Clochardt (klösh'ärd), n. (From Fr. cloche,

a bell. See CLOCK.) A belfry. Weever. Clochier, t n. [Fr. clocher.] A bell-tower; 5. a belfry. Ayliffe. Clock (klok), n. (Originally a bell, and hence CI the apparatus which causes a bell to strike fo at certain intervals, a clock. The word is in widely spread, and its ultimate origin is not th clear. Comp. A. Sax. clucga, Icel, klukka, Dan. klokke,

Sw. klocka, D. kelok, G. glocke, a Cl bell or clock; Ir. and Gael. clog, a bell or te clock. Cloak is the same word, through L.L. clocca, cloca, a belland a kind of cape, whence Fr. cloche, a bell. ) I. An instrument or machine for measuring time, indicating the Ci hours, minutes, and often seconds by means of hands moving over a dial-plate, and dif

ir fering from a watch in not being adapted to

CL

d be carried on the person. It generally consists of a frame containing a train of wheels moved by weights or springs, and regulated

CL by a pendulum or balance-wheel, and is generally made to mark the hourand often lesser divisions of time by the stroke of a hammer on a bell or other sonorous object.-2. A stroke of the clock. I told the clocks and watched the wasting light.

an

What dipping girls there were in that derecke

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separated by clipping. The dippings at our beards and parings of our nails' Loche

. 3. The act of embracing. Clipping-time (klip'ing-tinh

, n. {Scotch The time of sheep-shearing; the nick of time. To come in dipping-tinte, to create as opportunely as he who visits a sheep farmer at sheep-shearing time, wben there is always mirth and good cheer. Sir, Scott Clipsyt (klip'si) a. As it eclipsed. Nam bright, now clipsy.' Romaunt of the Raum Clique (klēk), .(Ft. clique, probably mere variant of claque, with a somewhat different sense. See" CLAQUE) A parts, set; a coterie: used generally in a bad sense

Mind, I don't call the London exclusive cigart best English society.

Carriga Cliquish (klēk'ish), a. Relating to a elique or party; disposed to form clíques; baring a petty party spirit.

Cliquishness (klēk'ish-nes), ?. The state statte, Villa or quality of being cliquish; inclination or - Rome. disposition to form cliques; tendency to

form cliques; cliquism. of the food Cliquism (klék'izm), n. The principles of hale's food spirit of a clique; cliquishness

. Clish-clash (klish'klash), r. (A reducliCLIO.] A

cation of clash. To sound like the clashplaced by ing of swords.

Mir. for Hags. lio.

Clish-clash (klish'klash), th Süly tulă; ut; ppr. palaver; gossip; scandal

. [Scotch same as / Clishmaclash (klishma-klash) . CiskDan

clash; clishmaclarer. {Scotch.)
ar; in Chishmaciaver (klish ma - klá - Fér)

, na
Idle discourse; silly talk; gossip Burns
[Scotch.)
Clitch 1 (klich)

, u.1. To catch; to clutch He hath an cartier pot wherewith to the Tip clitoria (kli-töri-a), n. (Clitoris(which se

in reference to the shape of the flowers A genus of plants, nat order Leguminest, found throughout the tropics of both worlds

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Dryden.

ch, chain;

ch, Sc. loch;

8, go;

j, job;

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