The Repertory of Patent Inventions, and Other Discoveries and Improvements in Arts, Manufactures, and Agriculture: Being a Continuation, on an Enlarged Plan, of the Repertory of Arts and Manufactures ...

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T. and G. Underwood, 1816
 

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Página 1 - Now Know Ye, that in compliance with the said proviso, I, the said Adolphe Nicole, do hereby declare that the nature of my said Invention, and the manner in which the same is to be performed, are particularly described and ascertained in and by the following statement thereof, reference being had to the Drawing hereunto annexed, and to the figures and letters marked thereon...
Página 252 - ... particularly describe and ascertain the nature of his invention, and in what manner the same was to be performed...
Página 290 - ... or trouble. These vessels being perfect cylinders, about a foot each in height, stand very conveniently upon each other, and thus present the means of preserving a large quantity of fruit in a very small room ; and if the spaces between the top of one vessel and the base of another, be filled with a cement composed of two parts of the curd of skimmed milk and one of lime, by which the air will be excluded, the later kinds of Apples and Pears will be preserved with little change in their appearance...
Página 100 - It is of importance that the specific gravity of a soil should be known, as it affords an indication of the quantity of animal and vegetable matter it contains; these substances being always most abundant in the lighter soils. The other physical properties of soils should likewise be examined before the analysis is made, as they denote, to a certain extent, their composition, and serve as guides in directing the experiments. Thus, siliceous soils are generally rough to the touch, and scratch glass...
Página 100 - Soils, though as dry as they can be made by continued exposure to air, in all cases still contain a considerable quantity of water, which adheres with great obstinacy to the earths and animal and vegetable matter, and can only be driven off from them by a considerable degree of heat. The first process of analysis is, to free the given weight of soil from as much of this water as possible, without in other respects affecting its composition; and this may be done by heating it for ten or twelve minutes...
Página 225 - ... increases in such a proportion that the soil approaches to a peat in its nature ; and if in a situation where it can receive water from a higher district, it becomes spongy, and permeated with that fluid, and is gradually rendered incapable of supporting the nobler classes of vegetables. Many peat-mosses seem to have been formed by the destruction of forests, in consequence of the imprudent use of the hatchet by the early cultivators of the country in which they exist : when the trees are felled...
Página 99 - ... this case, and in analogous cases, the portions different from each other should be separately submitted to experiment. Soils when collected, if they cannot be immediately examined, should be preserved in phials quite filled with them, and closed with ground glass stoppers. The quantity of soil most convenient for a perfect analysis is from two to four hundred grains. It should be collected in dry weather, and exposed to the atmosphere till it becomes dry to the touch. The specific gravity of...
Página 103 - ... matter, the respective quantities may be ascertained by weighing the residuum after the action of the acid, which must be .applied till the mixture has acquired a sour taste, and has ceased to effervesce. This residuum is the siliceous part...
Página 104 - Into the fluid freed from oxide of iron, a solution of neutralized carbonate of potash must be poured, till all effervescence ceases in it, and till its taste and smell indicate a considerable excess of alkaline salt. The precipitate that falls down is carbonate of lime ; it must be collected on the filter, and dried at a heat below that of redness. The remaining fluid must be boiled for a quarter of an hour, when the magnesia, if...
Página 278 - I have analysed several specimens of the fire-damp in the laboratory of the Royal Institution; the pure inflammable part was the same in all of them, but it was sometimes mixed with small quantities of atmospherical air, and in some instances with azote and carbonic acid.

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