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He jumped out of the pit, and I could make nothing of us, and sat followed without asking why. Going down, and began to scratch his ear on his hands and knees where the like a dog; then taking a long look stag stood when I fired, he pointed at the surrounding forest, as if he to the wet mud. • Deko, Sahib!' was thinking, trotted off into the said he, and he pointed to a patch, shadows. as big as the crown of a hat, of short We presently heard his peculiar cut hair sprinkled on the mud. shriek and bark, such a noise as • But he has gone off, Bussassa ?' could only be imitated by a suddenly

Ne, Sahib, ne; girgia, nusdig frightened cur dog, hai—No, sir, he has dropped, and About half an hour after this is close at hand.' So saying, he visit, a noise of many feet attracted went back to the pit, and brought our attention, and, grunting and out his sword, an ugly-looking wea squeaking, came a sounder of some pon enough, and, leading the way, thirty hog. A huge boar, with tretook up the pugg, and followed it mendous tusks, led the party, coninto the jungle.

sisting of pigs of every age, down to * Hai, Sahib, hai-Shabash-here a family of squeakers of two months he is! bravo,' cried Bussassa, and old. They were on the opposite side he stood with one foot on the dead of the pool, some thirty paces off, stag.

but the night was so light that you I could hardly believe in my

could almost see their eyes. good luck, as I walked round him, Again my gun was tremulously and contemplated his immense ant grasped and pointed, and again Buslers. Oh, here's a trophy! if I sassa jogged and nudged me, and never shoot another,' thought I. whispered Marro gelde. The same

• What did I tell you, sir said confusion was among the pigs on Bussassa ; 'did I not say we were the report of my gun, but this

time, sure to have luck if you made poo as the smoke cleared off, a large jah to 'Huniman'? We shall get black mass lay. wriggling in the another shot before morning.' And mud. A victorious girgia' from he began to teardownsmall branches Bussassa, and an English 'hurrah' to cover the haunches of the stag. from Hardbargain, and they both We protected the animal from the were standing over the prostrate jackals as well as we could in a boar, Bussassa, in the excess of his hurry, and returned to the pit; joy, kicking the dead pig with the loaded the discharged barrel, and fat of his foot, and heaping abusive relapsed into silence. Sleep was epithets on him and on his mother out of the question-those antlers and sisters. were too prominently before

my

We returned to our hiding-place, mind's eye to admit such a weak. and I loaded again, while Bussassa

sang praises to 'Huniman.' I was Spitter, spatter-spitter, spatter, satisfied with my success, though went a host of little frogs, as they Bussassa still promised another shot, fled from the bank, and hopped as it was not later than twelve or along on the top of the water, like one o'clock. flying-fish pursued by a dolphin. The faint boom of a gun came on Our eyes were instantly peering out the breeze; Bussassa referred it to over the margin of our hiding a pool about four miles off, where a place.

village Shicaree had probably made Only a jackal! 'Not a jackal,' a successful shot. whispered Bussassa, 'a baloo,' the Presently I heard, for the first genuine lion's provider—understood time, the clear, musical bark of the to be an old jackal, who, no longer spotted deer-so clear-sounding that able to hunt for himself, follows a it always gives one an idea of frosty tiger, as the pilot-fish does a shark, air. Our friend the 'baloo' we also only, for obvious reasons, at a more heard from time to time, yelling and respectful distance.

barking as if he was baying at his He lapped some water, and came awful companion. Bussassa looked smelling along towards our place ; uneasy. stopped, and stared in our direction The moon was rapidly slanting with his ears pricked forwards ; towards the west, and I grew sleepy

ness.

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effect produced by performance. with God ;' and may I never forget Singers with other great and varied the impression of those sounds. excellences have arisen since the His fine taste was either natural to time of Bartlenian; but the same him, or showed itself so early as to splendid voice, the same untiring make it appear so. Under Dr. zeal, the same mental energy, and Cooke's tuition it met with every the same independence of character, encouragement; and I think it must as well as the same knowledge and be acknowledged by all who ever love of his art, must unite in one heard him, that, excepting the lark person in order to form another singing up to heaven's gate,' no. singer like him ; for into the dis. thing more melodious ever warbled charge of his duty all these qualities in the air.' habitually entered.

The Academy of Ancient Music, The race of his eminent musical though verging towards extinction, contemporaries is nearly extinct; one was still supported by a respectable only of his frequent associates re- list of subscribers, and young Bar. maining. The following sketch tleman was allowed to take his comes from one who knew him in the place among the principal trebles, zenith of his fame, who has been for which voice, education, and taste with him in public and in private, eminently qualified him. Of his who enjoyed the privilege of occa- early superiority,' Miss Hawkins sionally singing with him, and the adds, 'he was as little vain as if it advantage of his advice and assistance. had consisted in spinning a top or A few years more, and Bartleman's trundling a hoop; and, let me add, remaining hearers will have followed that in the goodness of his nature him; and tradition, unless assisted he never forgot where he had spent by some record like the present, so many of his boyish hours; and will only hand down his name as that whatever time elapsed without one of the eminent singers of his our writing, he was always prompt

and eager to express his unabated 'James Bartleman, the finest regard for us. Success never altered, singer that the English school has applause never elevated him; and produced, was born, it is believed, he died, as he had lived, beloved in Westminster, September 19,1769. beyond the usual degree of love At the usual age he was admitted bestowed on those whose excellence into the choir of Westminster Abbey, has no companion.' of which Dr. Cooke was then or- When his voice broke, Bartleman ganist and master of the boys. His resolved on making music his provoice and capacity soon raised him fession, for which he assiduously above his contemporaries, and he be- qualified himself by diligent study. came a deserved favourite with his He applied himself to the practice master. His early familiarity with of the organ and pianoforte, and the best specimens of the highest became also an excellent performer style of music disciplined and formed on the violoncello. He studied his taste, and his admiration of the with the fondness of an enthusiast great masters of the English school, the works of the Italian, English, imbibed when a boy, terminated and Flemish madrigal writers, and only with his life. Miss Hawkins, early began to form that unrivalled the daughter of the musical his. collection of them which was untorian, in her Anecdotes and Bio fortunately dispersed at his death. graphical Sketches, thus speaks of In 1793, he joined the Madrigal him as a boy :— Bartleman would Society, where he associated with sometimes spend the leisure part of his master Dr. Cooke, Stevens, a whole day at our house, where, at Horsley, Spofforth, Robert Cooke, my father's request, he would sing and other less eminent composers of whatever was put before him, and the English school. The library of with the sweetness of a lark pour this society yet contains many comforth his mellifluous notes. It was positions which he scored for its when called upon to sing a solo use. Two years before, he had been anthem that he most shone and elected a member of the Catch Club, most delighted. I now seem to hear where he was accustomed to meet him in Greene's 'Acquaint thyself Webbe, Callcott, Harrison, Knyvett,

morning, I made myself up for a Bussassa came round at once, and nap.

on the principle of 'you scratch my When I awoke, there was a streak back and I'll scratch yours,' de. of light in the east. The morning clared that young English gentlewas breaking. It was light enough men had no fear, and required pruto see that Bussassa was right, the dent Shicarees to keep them out of boar was gone! The tiger had danger. positively juggled him away from We now drew our balls and almost under our very noses, with loaded with some large shot that I out our hearing any noise.

had with me: and, as the sun rose I wish I had got a sight at that over the dripping jungle, got raking tiger,' said I.

shots at the pea-fowl when they If you had fired, sir, when his came to drink. Killing six, inhead was towards us, growling in cluding a splendid doom-waller-> that way, you would never have cock with a train six feet long. shot again, at tigers or anything Thus ended this, to me, memoelse ; he would have been on us and rable night, my first in the jungle. killed us both. It is the same that My servant with some bread and a killed my brother.'

bottle of tea, and the horsekeeper *Pooh, pooh, Bussassa,' said I, with the pony, were with us by six. how many tigers have been killed We found the boar about two hunin this district since then P

dred yards off, with his hind quarIt is the same, sir, every one ters eaten, and as I had a day's knows that; he has never been journey to make to get to cantonkilled, and never will be: he is not ments, and but one more day's a common tiger, he is a devil.' leave, I reluctantly left him for the

Oh! that is the reason you were tiger: hoping to cultivate the devil's so frightened then ?

acquaintance next moon, and in I was not frightened, sir, for greater security. Bussassa highly myself; what should I have done if approved of this resolution, and was you had been killed ?

not so positive about his immortaI think, Bussassa, you would lity. have done what you did when your The boar's and stag's head were brother was killed, and taken to cut off, and sent on to cantonment your heels.'

to be stuffed. I gave the venison The old fellow was thoroughly to Bussassa, who divided a portion vexed now, and began to mumble with my servants and sold the rest to himself, and as I felt that it was to the villagers of Gouldscope. only his position in my service that Well, I am glad you have reprevented his giving me a bit of turned in safety,' said a punsterhis mind, I confessed that I was friend of mine, to whom I that never in such a stew in my life, and night related my adventures. Al. that we had had a most narrow though you lost your pork, you escape, and that he showed great saved your bacon.' coolness in holding my gun down.

MEMOIR OF JAMES BARTLEMAN.

The painter's dead, yet still he charms the eye,
While England lives, his fame can never die;
But he who struts his hour upon the stage
Can scarce protract his fame through half an age,
Nor pen nor pencil can the actor save,

The art and artist have one common grave.
THE truth contained in these lines, cient notion of the quality, power,

I which were written by Garrick, and varied inflection of the singing was afterwards amplified and applied voice, and the peculiar and striking to the great actor in Sheridan's expression which it is sometimes monody upon him, and equally does capable of producing, than of the it describe the transient popularity speaking tones and gesture of an of the singer. It is perhaps still actor. In the former case we can more difficult to convey any suffi. scarcely do more than relate the

1853.]
His Early Life.

165 effect produced by performance. with God ;' and may I never forget Singers with other great and varied the impression of those sounds. excellences have arisen since the His fine taste was either natural to time of Bartleman; but the same him, or showed itself so early as to splendid voice, the same untiring

make it appear. so.

Under Dr. zeal, the same mental energy, and Cooke's tuition it met with every the same independence of character, encouragement; and I think it must as well as the same knowledge and be acknowledged by all who ever love of his art, must unite in one heard him, that, excepting the lark person in order to form another singing up to heaven's gate,' nosinger like him; for into the dis thing more melodious ever warbled charge of his duty all these qualities in the air.' habitually entered.

The Academy of Ancient Music, The race of his eminent musical though verging towards extinction, contemporaries is nearly extinct; one was still supported by a respectable only of his frequent associates re list of subscribers, and young Bar. maining. The following sketch tleman was allowed to take his comes from one who knew him in the

place among the principal trebles, zenith of his fame, who has been for which voice, education, and taste with him in public and in private, eminently qualified him. • Of his who enjoyed the privilege of occa early superiority,' Miss Hawkins sionally singing with him, and the adds, ‘he was as little vain as if it advantageofhis adviceandassistance. had consisted in spinning a top or A few years more, and Bartleman's trundling a hoop; and, let me add, remaining hearers will have followed that in the goodness of his nature him; and tradition, unless assisted he never forgot where he had spent by some record like the present, 80 many of his boyish hours ; and will only hand down his name as that whatever time elapsed without one of the eminent singers of his our writing, he was always prompt day.

and eager to express his unabated James Bartleman, the finest regard for us. Success never altered, singer that the English school has applause never elevated him; and produced, was born, it is believed, he died, as he had lived, beloved in Westminster, September 19,1769. beyond the usual degree of love At the usual age he was admitted bestowed on those whose excellence into the choir of Westminster Abbey, has no companion.' of which Dr. Cooke was then or When his voice broke, Bartleman ganist and master of the boys. His resolved on making music his proFoice and capacity soon raised him fession, for which he assiduously above his contemporaries, and he be qualified himself by diligent study. came a deserved favourite with his He applied himself to the practice master. His early familiarity with of the organ and pianoforte, and the best specimens of the highest became also an excellent performer style of music disciplined and formed on the violoncello. He studied his taste, and his admiration of the with the fondness of an enthusiast great masters of the English school, the works of the Italian, English, imbibed when a boy, terminated and Flemish madrigal writers, and only with his life. Miss Hawkins, early began to form that unrivalled the daughter of the musical his collection of them which was untorian, in her Anecdotes and Bio fortunately dispersed at his death. graphical Sketches, thus speaks of In 1793, he joined the Madrigal him as a boy :- Bartleman would Society, where he associated with sometimes spend the leisure part of his master Dr. Cooke, Stevens, a whole day at our house, where, at Horsley, Spofforth, Robert Cooke, my father's request, he would sing

and other less eminent composers of whatever was put before him, and the English school. The library of with the sweetness of a lark pour this society yet contains many comforth his mellifluous notes. It was positions which he scored for its when called upon to sing a solo use. Two years before, he had been anthem that he most shone and elected a member of the Catch Club, most delighted. I now seem to hear where he was accustomed to meet him in Greene's 'Acquaint thyself Webbe, Callcott, Harrison, Knyvett,

Sale, and Greatorex; but he retired from this society for a time, and rejoined it in 1798. At the time when Bartleman first appeared as a solo singer, Reinhold, Champness, and the elder Sale were in possession of the public favour; and in 1791, his name appears in the following list of bass chorus singers at the Ancient Concerts—Danby, Doyle, Saunders, Bartleman, and Boyce.

After the season of 1791 had ter minated, Harrison seceded from the Ancient Concerts, together with Miss Cantelo, afterwards Mrs. Harrison. Bartleman, who now began to feel that his rising powers were adequate to something more than chorus singing, enlisted in the orchestra of the Vocal Concerts, which were established by Harrison and Knyvett in 1792. The orchestra at these concerts consisted only of a pianoforte and a quartet band; and their materials were glees, songs, and catches. The first year produced a successful pecuniary result; but having to contend not only against the fashionable Ancient Concerts, but those of Salomon, conducted by Haydn and aided by the talents of Mara, and the Pro. fessional Concerts, supported by Pleyel and Billington, the specula. tions of the seceders terminated un. profitably after the season of 1794, when Harrison and Bartleman returned to the Ancient Concerts ; and in 1795, the latter took that station which he held without a rival till his death. The principal singers for this year were Signora Banti, Mrs. Harrison ; Messrs. Harrison, Nield, Bartleman, Champness, Knyvett, Sale (the elder), and Bellamy (the elder). His first song was • The Lord worketh wonders,' his second, 'Go, my faithful soldier,' neither of them admitting or requir ing more than a good voice and a moderate share of execution. His third song, ‘Nasce al bosco,' from Handel's Ezio, displayed his powers as a singer to much greater advantage, and it continued to be a favourite with him and with the public throughout his life. Up to this time the Concerts of Ancient Music were little more than performances of Handel's compositions: -the noble directors adopting the taste of George III., who, in his

private concerts restricted his musi. cal enjoyment to these alone. But Bartleman had now felt his ground; and the indications of his vigorous and active mind, as well as his power, soon manifested themselves. He venerated Handel, but not with ignorant and exclusive devotion; and from the long neglected remains of Purcell's genius he imparted new life and new character to these concerts, while they furnished abundant scope for the display of his unrivalled abilities as a singer. If Purcell had never written these would have been but imperfectly displayed; and it may also be safely affirmed that some of Purcell's great songs were unknown until Bartleman revealed their varied and extraordinary excellences. In Purcell's time the vocal art, lost and forgotten in the age wbich immediately preceded him, was yet but in its infancy, while his songs demand the powers of its full maturity. He wrote them for posterity.

In 1796, Bartleman resumed his place at the Ancient Concerts, but the season had half expired ere he was allowed to venture on the novel and perilous experiment of reviving Pur. cell. At the sixth concert he sung the magician's song from the Indian Queen, You twice ten hundred deities;' and his auditors were soon made to feel the truth of Burney's remark, that this song opens with the finest piece of recitative in our language. But who will ever forget his delivery of the passage

From thy sleepy mansion rise,

And open thy unwilling eyes. The gradual crescendo, from the first bar of this expressive passage until the full power of his splendid voice pealed in at its close, took the audience by surprise. Accustomed to the chaste simplicity and quiet excellence of Harrison, the fire and animation of the new English singer, and the bold originality of the music on which he was engaged, awoke them as from a dream. At the next concert, he revived the Frost Scene,' from King Arthur, a composition in which the learning as well as the genius of Purcell are equally conspicuous. The part of The Cold Genius' presents difficulties to the singer which occur in no other song, but Bartleman overcame them all,

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