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THE

English Flocutionist

A COLLECTION OF THE FINEST PASSAGES

Poetry and Eloquence ;

ESPECIALLY FITTED FOR RECITATION AND READING ALOUD;

WITH THE

PRONUNCIATION OF PROPER NAMES.

For the Use of Students of Elocution and the Higher Classes

in Schools.

BY CHARLES HARTLE Y,

PROFESSOR OF ELOCUTION AND ORATORY ;
AUTHOR OF “ELOCUTION MADE EASY ;" “ORATORY MADE ,KA

LONDON:
GROOM BRIDGE AND SO

5, PATERNOSTER ROW.

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MR. HARTLEY

CONTINUES TO GIVE

PRIVATE LESSONS IN ORATORY & ELOCUTION

For the Senate, the Church, the Bar, etc.; for the Stage,
Public Reading, and as an Accomplishment; and in

ENGLISH COMPOSITION.

Stammering, Stuttering, Imperfect R, Misplaced Aspirate, Lisping, Monotony, Thick Utterance, Falsetto, or Effeminaté Voice, Dysphonia Clericorum, and all Defects of Voice, Articulation, and Pronunciation, permanently cured.

UPWARDS OF TWENTY YEARS' EXPERIENCE IN TEACHING.

IN LONDON AND OXFORD.
The Highest References and Testimonials.

Address, by letter, to the care of Messrs. GROOMBRIDGE AND Sons, 5, Paternoster Row.

Preface

Of the many “ Speakers” and “Readers” published, nearly all contain a large proportion of passages more fitted for silent reading than for reading aloud and for recitation; and which have been apparently chosen rather for their beauty than for their fitness for elocutionary practice. In this Work, the Editor has sought to select passages combining the highest poetry and eloquence with peculiar fitness for expressive reading aloud and recitation; and trusts that he has thus supplied a want that teachers and students of elocution and masters of schools have long felt.

The Editor has much pleasure in thanking the Authors and Proprietors of various Copyright pieces, for their kind permission to insert them.

For Instruction in Elocution, the reader is respectfully referred to Hartley's “Elocution made Easy,” price 1s., post-free for 12 stamps. Groombridge and Sons, 5, Paternoster Row, London.

“ The mind should be great in imagination and virtuous emotion, no less than in intellect, to be healthy and vigorous in all its proportions.”—RUSKIN.

“It is no wisdom to make boys prodigies of information ; but it is our wisdom and our duty to cultivate their faculties each in its season-first the memory and imagination, and then the judgment; to furnish them with the means, and to excite the desire of improving themselves, and to wait with confidence for God's blessing on the result.”-REV. DR. ARNOLD.

“Poetry has been to me an exceeding great reward ; it has soothed my affliction ; it has multiplied and refined my enjoyments ; it has endeared my solitude ; and it has given me the habit of wishing to discover the Good and the Beautiful in all that meets and surrounds me.”—COLERIDGE.

“ Verse far exceedeth prose in the knitting up of the memory. Who is it that ever was a scholar that does not carry away some verses which in his youth he learned, and even to old age serve him for hourly lessons.”—SIR PHILIP SIDNEY.

“ There are some truths, deeper and more vital than those of Science, and with respect to which the heart-is wiser than the head. It is Poetry or Literature which reflecting the concentrated result of the universal experience of life communicates these unchanging and everlasting truths through the imagination, affections, and conscience.”—NATIONAL REVIEW.

"Its great tendency and purpose is, to carry the mind beyond and above the beaten, dusty, weary walks of ordinary life ; to lift it into a purer element ; and to breathe into it more profound and generous emotion. It reveals to us the loveliness of nature, brings back the freshness of early feeling, revives the relish of simple pleasures, keeps unquenched the enthusiasm which warmed the spring-time of our being, refines youthful love, strengthens our interests in human nature by vivid delineations of its tenderest and loftiest feelings, spreads our sympathies over all classes of society, knits us by new ties with universal being, and, through the brightness of its prophetic visions, helps faith to lay hold on the future life.- REV. DR. CHANNING..

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RHYMED VERSE.

PAGE

The Isles of Greece, . . . Lord Byron 1

Sunset at Athens .

. Lord Byron 4

The Present Aspect of Greece.

Greece . . . . Lord Byron

Lady Clara Vere de Vere . . . . Tennuson

King Robert of Sicily . . . . . Longfelloro 11

The High Tide . . . . . Miss Ingelovo 18

Lucy . .

. Wordsworth

My Mind to me a Kingdom is.

Byrd

The Character of a Happy Life

. Sir Henry Wotton

The Holly-Tree · · ·

. Southey 26

Knowledge .

· Ascribed to Shakespeare 27

The Homes of England .

. Mrs. Hemans

Love of Country . . . . Sir Walter Scott 29

Ye Mariners of England . . . . . Campbell 30

Battle of the Baltic . . .

Campbell

The Knight's Tomb .

. . Coleridge

My Last Duchess.

. Browning 34

* Imperial Cæsar, dead, and turned to clay” . . Shakespeare 35

Ode to a Nightingale . . . . . . Keats 36

To a Waterfowl.

Bryant 38

The Pharisee and the Publican .

.

and the rublican

. . Crashaw 39

The Passions. . . . . . . . Collins 40

The Reason Why .

The Death of Marmion. .

Sir Walter Scott

Waterloo .

. . Lord Byron 47

The Charge of the Light Brigade . . . . Tennyson 50

The Burial of Sir John Moore . .. . . Wolfe 52

Somebody's Darling .

. . Mrs. Lacoste 53

“ Take them, O Death ! and bear away". . Longfellow 54

The Curfew-Song of England . i . Mrs. Hemans 55

. . Crabbe 56

The Burial of William the Conqueror. Mrs. Hemans 57

The Norman Baron .

Longfellow 59

Elegy in a Country Churchyard ·

The Dying Christian to his Soul

. . . Pope 65

The Sleep . . . . . Mrs. Barrett-Browning 66

Address to the Ocean . . . . . Lord Byron 68

The Shipwreck . .

. Lord Byron 70

The Treasures of the Deep . . . Mrs. Hemans 72

Alexander's Feast

· Dryden

74

Ode for Music on St. Cecilia's Day . . . . Pope 78

Love among the Ruins . .

. Browning

The Battle of Blenheim . . .

Southey 85

The Cross in the Wilderness .

Mrs. Hemans

On the Receipt of my Mother's Picture . . . Cowper

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