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tations of the classroom, on the fundamental subjects of legal education, which, through a judicious rearrangement of emphasis, shall provide adequate training combined with a thorough knowledge of the general principles of the subject. The collection will develop the law historically and scientifically; English cases will give the origin and development of the law in England; American cases will trace its expansion and modification in America; notes and annotations will suggest phases omitted in the printed case. Cumulative references will be avoided, for the footnote may not hope to rival the digest. The law will thus be presented as an organic growth, and the necessary connection between the past and the present will be obvious. :

“The importance and difficulty of the subject as well as the time that can properly be devoted to it will be carefully considered so that each book may be completed within the time allotted to the particular subject. * * * If it be granted that all, or nearly all, the studies required for admission to the bar should be studied in course by every student-and the soundness of this contention can hardly be seriously doubted—it follows necessarily that the preparation and publication of collections of cases exactly adapted to the purpose would be a genuine and by no means unimportant service to the cause of legal education. And this result can best be obtained by the preparation of a systematic series of casebooks constructed upon a uniform plan under the supervision of an editor in chief. * * *

"The preparation of the casebooks has been intrusted to experienced and well-known teachers of the various subjects included, so that the experience of the classroom and the needs of the students will furnish a sound basis of selection.”

Since this announcement of the Series was first made there have been published books on the following subjects: Administrative Law. By Ernst Freund, Professor of Law in the

University of Chicago. Agency, including Master and Servant. Second Edition. By Edwin C.

Goddard, Professor of Law in the University of Michigan. Bills and Notes. Second Edition. By Howard L. Smith, Professor of

Law in the University of Wisconsin, and Underhill Moore, Pro

fessor of Law in Columbia University. Carriers. By Frederick Green, Professor of Law in the University of

Illinois. Conflict of Laws. Second Edition. By Ernest G. Lorenzen, Pro

fessor of Law in Yale University. Constitutional Law. By James Parker Hall, Dean of the Faculty of

Law in the University of Chicago. Contracts. By Arthur L. Corbin, Professor of Law in Yale University,

Corporations. Second Edition. By Harry S. Richards, Dean of the

Faculty of Law in the University of Wisconsin. Criminal Law. Second Edition. By William E. Mikell, Dean of the

Faculty of Law in the University of Pennsylvania. Criminal Procedure. By William E. Mikell, Dean of the Faculty of

Law in the University of Pennsylvania. Damages. By Floyd R. Mechem, Professor of Law in the University

of Chicago, and Barry Gilbert, of the Chicago Bar. Equity. By George H. Boke, formerly Professor of Law in the Uni

versity of California. Equity. By Walter Wheeler Cook, Professor of Law in Yale Uni

versity. Three volumes. Evidence. By Edward W. Hinton, Professor of Law in the Universi

ty of Chicago.. Insurance. By William R. Vance, Professor of Law in Yale Uni

versity. International Law. By James Brown Scott, Lecturer on International

Law and the Foreign Relations of the United States in the School

of Foreign Service, Georgetown University. Legal Ethics, Cases and Other Authorities on. By George P. Costigan,

Jr., Professor of Law in the University of California. Oil and Gas. By Victor H. Kulp, Professor of Law in the University

of Oklahoma. Partnership. By Eugene A. Gilmore, Professor of Law in the Uni

versity of Wisconsin, with Supplement by William E. Britton,

Professor of Law in the University of Illinois. Persons (including Marriage and Divorce), By Albert M. Kales, late of

the Chicago Bar, and Chester G. Vernier, Professor of Law in

Stanford University. Pleading (Common Law). By Clarke B. Whittier, Professor of Law

in Stanford University. and Edmund M. Morgan, Professor of

Law in Harvard University. Property (Future Interests). By Albert M. Kales, late of the Chicago

Bar. Property (Personal). By Harry A. Bigelow, Professor of Law in the

University of Chicago. Property (Rights in Land). By Harry A. Bigelow, Professor of

Law in the University of Chicago. Property (Titles to Real Property). By Ralph W. Aigler, Professor

of Law in the University of Michigan. Property (Wills, Descent, and Administration). By George P. Costi

gan, Jr., Professor of Law in the University of California.

Quasi Contracts. By Edward S. Thurston, Professor of Law in Yale

University. Sales. Second Edition. By Frederic C. Woodward, Professor of Law

in the University of Chicago. Suretyship. By Crawford D. Hening, formerly Professor of Law

in the University of Pennsylvania. Torts. By Charles M. Hepburn, formerly Dean of the Faculty of Law

in the University of Indiana. Trade Regulation. By Herman Oliphant, Professor of Law in Colum

bia University. Trusts. By George P. Costigan, Jr., Professor of Law in the Univer

sity of California. Trusts. By Thaddeus D. Kenneson, Late Professor of Law in the

University of New York.
Casebooks on other subjects are in preparation..

It is earnestly hoped and believed that the books thus far published in this series, with the sincere purpose of furthering scientific training in the law, have not been without their influence in bringing about a fuller understanding and a wider use of the case method.

WILLIAM R. Vance,

General Editor.

PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION

uguay.

DURING the fifteen years that have elapsed since the publication of the first edition of this casebook, the subject of the Conflict of Laws has become one of the major courses in the law school curriculum of many institutions. It is to meet the need of these schools that this larger volume has been prepared.

The scope of the notes on foreign law has been expanded, by including the law of Argentina and Brazil and that of the Convention of Montevideo, of 1889, which is in force as between Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay.

Matter in the text, rewritten or inserted by the editor, is placed in brackets.

As in the first edition, the Journal du Droit International Privé has been cited as “Clunet,” the Revue de Droit International Privé et de Droit Pénal International, as “Darras," the Revue Internationale du Droit Maritime, as “Autran," and the Zeitschrift für Internationales Privat und Strafrecht (now Zeitschrift für Internationales Recht), as "Niemeyer."

E. G. L. New HAVEN, Conn., January, 1924.

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