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tary to Hamilton, 226; return
to England, 227 ; quoted, 227 ;
first speech in the House, 228 ;
leads the Rockingham Whigs,
229 ; purchase of “The Gre-
gories ”—the Wilkes case, 230 ;
Chatham's return to political
life, 231; his death, 232;
Burke in Parliament, 232;
quoted, 233, 234 ; leader of his
party, 235; quoted, 237, 239,
240, 241, 243; the Rocking.
ham Ministry, 246 ; his claims
on Parliamentary preferment
-his unpopularity, 248; his
coarseness, 250; his integrity
as Paymaster—against Parlia-
mentary reform, 251 ; differ.
ences with Fox, 252; the India
Bill, 254 ; contest with Pitt-
trial of Warren Hastings, 257
et seq.; Burke's speech quoted,
262; the French Revolution,

Burke's horror of it, 267 ;
his violent language, 273 ;
quarrel with Fox, 277; his
“Reflections on the Revolu-
tion," 278; last appearance in
the House-loss of his son,
280 ; attacked by Bedford-his
reply quoted, 281 ; his last
days, 284 ; quoted, 285 ; illness

and death—his character, 287.
Burnet, Bishop, quoted, 109.

266 ;

on

Camden, Lord, and Mansfield, 198.
Campbell,

con, 22, 35 ;
on Mansfield, 150, 214.
Canning and Brougham, 362.
Caroline, Queen, courageous con-
Eliot, Sir John, Speech by, 86.
Elizabeth, Queen, and Bacon, 34, 35.
Ellenborough, Lord, 325.
Equality, Selden on, 99.
Erskine quoted, 208.
Essex, The Earl of, and Bacon, 27,

Brougham, Lord-on Burke, 249,

273, 277 ; his life virtually a
failure, 339, 340; the reason
why-anecdote of, 340 ; his
youth-early studies, 341; his
student life, 342; choice of a
profession, 343; the “Edin.
burgh Review,” 344; called to
the bar, 346; counsel for the
Liverpool merchants—returned
to Parliament his maiden
speech, 347; success at the
Bar, 348 ; Solicitor-General to
Queen Caroline, 349 ; speeches
on her behalf, 351, 353, 354;
his great popularity, 356 ; his
defence of Mr. Williams, 357 ;
his general convictions, 361 ;
quarrel with Canning, 362;
Parliamentary career continued,
363; Catholic Emancipation-
Brougham as Lord Chancellor,
364; anecdote of his mother,
365; the Reform Bill, 366;
speech on the bill, 370; his
share in the struggle, 372;
quoted, 372; his services to
the country, 373; decline of
his popularity, 374 ; his attacks
on the Whigs, 376; quoted,
376 ; literary labours, 377; his
rivalries and contentions, 379;
the Corn Laws, 380 ; his last
years and death-his literary

productions, 382.
Burke, Edmund- birth and parent-

age-early pursuits, 216 ; child.
hood- education, 217 ; quoted,
219; goes to London, 220 ;
his marriage—his description of
his wife, 224 ; private secre-

duct of, 349; her death, 357.

36, 42.
Exclusion Bill, The, 116.
Evil-speaking, Selden on,

100.

Catholic Emancipation, 364 ; bill

passed, 372.
Charles I.-his struggle with his

Parliament, 83-89.
Chatham, Lord-quoted, 197; last

apr ce in the House, 201.
Chesterfield, Lord - on Mansfield,

158.
Church of England, Burke on the,

237.
Cibber, Mrs., Mansfield's defence

of, 150.
Clarendon on Selden, 75.
Coke, Attorney-General-his attack

on Bacon, 33; his distich on

the “Organum,” 63.
Coleridge quoted, 98.
" Commentaries on Asiatic Poetry,”

by Sir W. Jones, 296.
Common Law," Bacon's treatise

Fox, C. J.-in Parliament, 169; on

the French Revolution, 276.
Fox and Burke, 252, 271.
Friends, Selden on, 102.

Garth quoted, 127.
Gentlemen, Selden on, 101.
Goldsmith quoted, 250.
Gorhambury, Note on, 59-61.
Gray's Inn, 21.

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Johnson, Dr., quoted, 98
Jones, Sir William—his pursuit of

knowledge, 291; birth and
parentage, 293 ; education,
294 ; tutor to Lord Althorp-
his Commentaries,” 296 ;
study of law, 297 ; quoted, 297,
298, 300, 301 ; his marriage,
304 ; quoted-goes to India,
304 ; first charge to jury
tour through India, 305 ; liter-
ary labours, 306; illness and
death, 308 ; character and la-

bours, 308, 309.
Jonson, Ben, quoted, 23, 36, 52, 62.
Junius, Letters of, 191, 230;

quoted, 194.

155 ; speech on the Hanoverian
troops, 160 ; Jacobite rebellion,
162; charges against him, 165 ;
Attorney-General, 170; Lord
Chief-Justice, 171 ; quoted,
172 ; speeches in the Lords,
174, 175, 177, 178 ; his great-
ness as a judge, 180; speech
quoted, 182 ; the Wilkes trial,
185; speech on it, 187 ; trial of
Woodfall-Mansfield's speech,
193 ; the Miller case, 194 ;
alliance with Bute,196; quoted,
197; the American colonies,
200; No Popery Riots, 202 ;
last days, 210 ; his death, 212 ;

opinions on Mansfield, 212.
“Mare Clausum,” Selden's, 89, 90.
Marlborough, Duchess of, 150.
Marriage, Selden on, 102.
Martineau, Miss, on Brougham, 340.
Money, Selden on, 101.
Montague, 130.
Morley quoted, 245.

Newton, Bishop, on Mansfield, 212.
“Notes on the States of Europe,”

Bacon's, 20.

Macaulay, Lord, quoted, 35, 67,

110, 131, 157, 378.
Mackintosh quoted, 104.
Mansfield, William, Earl of-early

disadvantages of our great
lawyers—reasons why eminence
in this profession is open alike
to all classes, 139; Mansfield's
birth and parentage-departure
for London-goes to West-
minster School, 141; to Christ
Church-member of Lincoln's
Inn-quoted, 143 ; à prize-
winner — takes B.A. degree,
144 ; his studies and habits of
life, 145; first legal success, 147;
addressed by Pope, 148, 149;
defends Mrs. Cibber-retained
by Duchess of Marlborough,
150; advocate of the London
merchants, 151 ; his marriage,
152; Solicitor-General-quoted,
153; Parliamentary successes,

“Ordinances of Menu,” translated

by Sir W. Jones, 307.

Patience, Selden on, 101.
Peacham, Prosecution of, 47.
Petition of Right, Debates on, 84.
Pilkington and Shute, Case of, 121.
Pitt, William, 144, 158 ; his minis-

try, 173, 256 ; contest with

Fox and Burke, 257.
Place Bill, The, 128.

Pope and Mansfield, 146, 154;

quoted, 35, 148, 149, 154.
Prayer, Selden on, 103.
Press-Freedom established, 128.
Pride, Selden on, 101.
Property Qualification Bill, The,

128.
Proverbs, Selden on, 103.

Reform Bill, The, 366; scene in

the House, 367.
Reverence, Selden on, 103.
Revolution, The French, 266.
Rockingham Ministry, The, 246.
Romilly, Sir Samuel, birth and par-

entage, 311; education and
acquirements, 312; George
Eliot quoted, 313 ; studies for
the law, 314, 315 ; quotation
from letter, 315, 318, 319;
social reputation-H.M. Coun-
sel, 320 ; Solicitor-General-
abolition of slavery, 321 ; An-
ecdote of, 323; influence of
his character, 328 ; returned
for Westminster-quoted, 330 ;
character of his wife, 331 ; suf-
fering on her account, 332 ; her
death-illness and death, 334,
335; character, 336 ; quoted,

337.
Roscoe quoted, 116 ; on Mansfield,

183.
Rowley, Dr., quoted, 63.
Russell, Earl, quoted, 105.

bours, 78; his book of “ Tithes,"
79, 80; his declaration in re-
gard thereto, 80 ; three tracts
by, 80 ; his sycophancy towards
James I., 81; after elevation
of his nature-his share in the
Protest of the Commons-his
arrest and release, 82; works
on constitutional law-enters
Parliament-his career there,
83-89; his speeches in the
House, 84 ; more publications,
85; committed to the Tower -
released-returns to literature,
89; the “ Mare Clausum,” 89,
90 ; resumes Parliamentary
career, 90, 94; subscribes to the
Solemn League and Covenant,
93; retires from Parliament-
activity of his pen, 94 ; closing
years of his life, 95 ; summary
of his life-work, 96, 97; his
views on Church and State, 97;

his “ Table-Talk," 98-103.
Self-denial, Selden on, 102.
Sermons, Selden on, 99.
Seven Bishops, Trial of the, 122.
Shrewsbury, Earl of, 114.
Slavery, Brougham's attacks on,

347.
Smollett, quoted, 105; on Mans-

field, 212.
Somers, John, Earl, 104; critical

opinions on-Mackintosh, 104;
Earl Russell, Smollett, Swift,
105; Addison, 107; Barnet,
109; Walpole-Macaulay, 110;
his benevolent character, 111;
his birth and parentage, 112,
113; education, 114 ; studies
for the law, 113; attracts at-

Selden, John-Clarendon's portrait-

ure of, 75, 76; birth and early
years, 76 ; his career at the
Bar-his “ Analection"-other
works, 77 ; his antiquarian la-

392

Somers retires from public life,

137 ; his death, 138.
Speddy, James, his defence of Ba.

con, 36.

Stephen, Leslie, quoted, 345.
Sublime and Beautiful, Burke on

the, 222.
Succession, The Protestant, 116.
Swift quoted, 105.

66

“ Table-Talk," Selden's, 98-103.
Tithes, History of," Selden's, 79,

INDEX.

80, 81.
“ Titles of Honour,” Selden's, 78.
Toleration Act, The, 126.
Triennial Parliaments Bill, 128.

tention of Lord Shrewsbury
and Sir F. Winnington
studies continued, 114 ; called
to the Bar-literary acquire-
ments-political principles, 115;
“History of the Succession":
Parliamentary disputes, 116 ;
Roscoe quoted, 117; Somers
quoted, 118, 119; literary la-
bours, 119; removal to London
-legal practice, 120; his suc-
cess, 121 ; Trial of the Seven
Bishops, 122 ; Parliamentary
Convention, 123; Speech on
James II.'s policy and flight-
Declaration of Rights, 124 ;
Solicitor - General, 125 ; the
Toleration Act-Somers made
Lord Keeper, 126 ; services to
English law, 127 ; rise of the
Tory party, 130 ; animosity of
the Opposition-charges against
Somers, 131 ; his enforced re-
signation, 132 ; charges against
him with reference to the Par-
tition Treaties, 134 ; his reply
and impeachment, 135; at-
tempts made to reconcile the
Whig leaders with the king-
death of William III., and
accession of Anne, 136 ; Whigs
restored to power

Somers
Lord President of Council-
Tories again in majority

Villiers, Duke of Buckingham-

Bacon's “ Advice” to, 48, 49;
his indignation at Bacon, 51 ;
impeachment of, 83 ; his death,
85.

Walpole, H., quoted, 110, 135, 174.
Whitelocke, quoted, 97.
Wilkes Trial, The, 185.
William III. and Mary-presenta-

tion of Declaration of Rights
to, 125; William enforces
Somers' resignation, 132 ; his

death, 136.
Winnington, Sir F., 114.
Woodfall, Trial of, 192.
Wroxall, quoted, 206.

S. W. PARTRIDGE AND CO., 9 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON.

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