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Praise waits for thee, O God, in Sion.
My brother hath torn my book.
Thou stoodest in my way, and hinderedst me.
So then it is not of him that wills, nor of him that runs, but
of God that shows mercy.

V.
The work has been finished last week.
He was out of employment this fortnight.
This mode of expression has been formerly in use.
I should be much obliged to him if he will attend to it.
I will pay the vows which my lips have uttered when I was in

trouble. I thought, by the accent, that he had been speaking to his

child. And he that was dead sat up and began to speak. Thou hast borne, and hast patience, and for my name's sake

hast labored, and hast not fainted. --Rev. ii., 3.
Ye will not come unto me that ye might have life.
At the end of this quarter, I shall be at school two years.
We bave done no more than it was our duty to have done.
We expected that he would have arrived last night.
Our friends intended to have met us.
We hoped to have seen you.
He would not have been allowed to have entered.

VI.
The doctor affirmed that fever always produced thirst.
The ancients asserted that virtue was its own reward.
Columbus knew that the earth was round.

VII.
Am sorry to hear of thy loss, but hope it may be retrieved.
The physician speaks favorably of the case ; is inclined to

think the patient will get well.
Should be happy to see you soon.
On further information, find my loss to be inconsiderable.

“Will martial flames forever fire thy mind,
And never, never be to Heaven resigned?”Pope.

Promiscuous.
Some people is always busy and yet does very little.
Sufficient data was not given to solve the problem.
A judicious selection of studies afford much aid.
Then thou spoke in vision to thy Holy One.
He dare not do as he threatens.
The man don't know what he wants.
Sobriety with humility lead to honor.

New York, May 3d, 1882. Dear Sir, Have just received your kind favor of this morning, and can

not forbear to express my gratitude to you. On further information, find I have not lost so much as at first supposed; and believe I shall still be able to meet all my engagements. Should, however, be happy to see you. Accept, dear sir, my most cordial thanks.

C. D.

Parsing. Parse the subjects and each of the predicate verbs in the following sentences,

EXAMPLE.--"I have said to corruption, Thou art my father.”

I is a personal pronoun, of the first person, singular number, common in gender, and in the nominative case, being the subject of the verb have said, according to the rule, -A noun or a pronoun which is the subject of a finite verb, must be in the nominative case.

Hade said is a verb, irregular in form, the principal parts being, say, said, saying, said; it is active transitive in signification, its object being the clause, Thou art my father. It is found in the indicative mood and perfect tense, and agrees with its subject I in the first person, singular number; according to the rule, A finite verb must agree with its subject or nominative, in person and number.

Thou is a personal pronoun, of the second person, singular number, and neuter gender (referring to corruption), and in the nominative case, being the subject of the verb art ; according to the rule, etc.

Art is an irregular neuter verb, the principal parts being be, was, being, leen; it is found in the indicative mood and present tense, and agrees with its subject thou in the Aecond person, singular number ; according to the rule, etc.

Did he say I could go ? I wish that I were sure of his sincerity. Tell me how long you have been there. What hast thou done ? To speak well is a valuable accomplishment. That you have spoken truly is not doubted. Canst thou minister to a mind diseased ? Unseen behind them sank the sun. Never decide rashly, or you may repent bitterly. Pluck one thread, and the web ye mar. I shall have departed, ere you return.

Rule IX.-Collective Nominative. When the nominative is a collective noun conveying the idea of plurality, the verb must agree with it in the plural number; but when it conveys the idea of unity, the verb must be singular; as, “My people do not consider.—“His army was defeated.“His armies were defeated.

OBS.-Whether the idea conveyed is that of plurality or unity, depends upon the meaning of the verb, that is, the nature of the assertion. If it refers to the individuals separately, plurality is conveyed, because there are more than one ; if to the whole collectively, unity is expressed, because there is but one body referred to. Thus, in the above examples, the people consider as individuals, not as a whole, to consider being an individual or personal act; but, in the second example, the army as a whole was defeated, not the individuals composing it.

False Syntax.
EXAMPLE.—The people rejoices in that which should cause

sorrow.

FORMULE.—Not proper, because the veri rejoices is of the singular number, and does
not correctly agree with its nominative people, which is a collective noun, conveying the
idea of plurality. But, according to Rule IX., “When the nominative is a collective
noun conveying the idea of plurality, the verb must agree with it in the plural number.”
Therefore, rejoices should be rejoice ; thus, The people rejoice in that which should
ca 1180 sorrow.
The nobility was assured that he would not interpose.
Blessed is the people that know the joyful sound.
The majority was disposed to adopt the measure.
The committee has voted upon the report.
The peasantry goes barefoot, and the middle class wears

wooden shoes.
The church have no power to inflict such punishments.
The fleet were almost destroyed in the action.
The regiment consist of a thousand men.
The council have established several salutary regulations.
No society are responsible for the conduct of its members.
A large flock of birds were in sight.
The public is informed that a meeting will be held.
A group of children was growing up about him.

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The jury have been formed, but has not agreed.
The happy pair has received the congratulations of their

friends.

Parsing.
Parse each collective noun and each vcrb in the preceding exercise.

Rule X.-Two or More Nominatives. When a verb has two or more nominatives connected by and, it must agree with them in the plural number; as, "Judges and senates have been bought for gold.”

Exceptions. 1. When two or more nominatives connected by and, serve merely to describe one person or thing, or when they are taken collectively, they do not require a plural verb; as, “ This philosopher and poet was banished from his country.”—Toll, tribute, and custom, was puid unto them."--Ezra iv., 20.

“Whose icy current and compulsive course

Ne'er feels retiring ebb, but keeps due on."-Shakspeare. 2. When two nominatives connected by and are emphatically distinguished, they belong to different propositions, and (if singular) do not require a plural verb; as, “ Ambition, and not the safety of the state, was concerned.Goldsmith.

" Ay, and no too, was no good divinity.”Shakspeare.

Love, and love only, is the loan for love."— Young. 3. When two or more nominatives connected by and are preceded by the adjective each, every, or no; they are taken separately, and do not require a plural verb; as, " When no part of their substance, and 110 one of their properties, is the same."-Butler. “Every limb and feature appears with its respective grace."-Steele.

4. When the verb separates its nominatives, it agrees with that which precedes it, and is understood to the rest ; as,

-Forth in the pleasing spring,
Thy beauty walks, thy tenderness, and love.”Thomson.

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Observations. 1. The conjunction is sometimes understood; as,

“ Art, empire, earth itself, to change are doomed."-- Beattie.

2. When the nominatives are of different persons, the verb agrees with the first person in preference to the second, and with the second in preference to the third ; for thou and I (or he, thou, and I) are equivalent to we; and thou and he are equivalent to you ; as, “Why speakest thou any more of thy matters? I have said, thou and Ziba divide the land.”—2 Sam. xix. i. e., “divide yo the land.”

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Notes, or Subordinate Rules. I.-When two subjects or antecedents are connected, one of which is taken affirmatively, and the other negatively, they belong to different propositions; and the verb or pronoun must agree with the affirmative subject, and be understood to the other; as, “ Diligent industry, and not mean savings, produces honorable competence.”

II. -When two subjects or antecedents are connected by as well as, but, or save, they belong to different propositions : and, (unless one of them is preceded by the adverb not,) tho verb and pronoun must agree with the former and be understood to the latter ; as, Veracity, as well as justice, is to be our rule of life.”Butler, Nothing but wailings was heard.

III.—When two or more subjects or antecedents are preceded by the adjective each, every, or no, they are taken separately, and require a verb and pronoun in the singular number ; as, “ And every sense,

and

every heart is joy.”Thomson. “Each beast, each insect, happy in its own."-Pope. IV.-Two or more distinct subject phrases connected by and, require a plural verb ; as, To be wise in our own eyes, to be wise in the opinion of the world, and to be wise in the sight of our Creator, are three things so very different, as rarely to coincide.”-Blair.

False Syntax.
EXAMPLE. - Industry and frugality leads to wealth.

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FORMULE.-Not proper, because the verb leads is in the singular number, and does not correctly agree with its two nominatives, industry and frugality, which are connected by and, and taken conjointly. But, according to Rule X., " When a verb has two or more nominatives connected by and, it must agree with them in the plural number." Therefore leads should be lead ; thus, Industry and frugality lead to wealth.

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