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Converse and love mankind might strongly draw
When love was liberty and nature law.

RULE II.
Be wise to-day 'tis madness to defer.
The present all their care the future his.
Wit makes an enterpriser sense a man.
Ask thought for joy grow rich and hoard within.
Song soothes our pains and age has pains to soothe.
Here an enemy encounters there a rival supplants him.
Our answer to their reasons is No to their scoffs nothing.

RULE III. In Latin there are six cases namely the nominative the genitive the

dative the accusative the vocative and the ablative. Most English nouns form the plural by adding 8 as boy boys nation

nations king kings bay bays. Bodies are such as are endued with a vegetable soul as plants a sensitive

soul as animals or a rational soul as the body of man.

III.-The Colon.

Copy the following sentences, and insert the comma, the semicolon, and the colon where they are required.

RULE I.
Death wounds to cure we fall we rise we reign.
Bliss !—there is none but unprecarious bliss.
That is the gem sell all and purchase that.
Beware of usurpation God is the judge of all.

RULE II.
I have the world here before me I will review it at leisure surely hap-

piness is somewhere to be found. A melancholy enthusiast courts persecution and when he cannot obtain

it afflicts himself with absurd penances but the holiness of St. Paul
consisted in the simplicity of a pious life.

Observe his awful port and admire
Nor stop at wonder imitate and live.

RULE III.
Such is our Lord's injunction “Watch and pray.”
He died praying for his persecutors “Father forgive them they know

not what they do.” On his cane was inscribed this motto “Festina lente."

IV.- The Period.

Copy the following sentences, and insert the comma, the semicolon, the colon, and the period, where they are required.

RULE I. Then appeared the sea and the dry land the mountains rose and the

rivers flowed the sun and moon began their course in the skies herbs and plants clothed the ground the air the earth and the waters were stored with their respective inhabitants at last man was

made in the image of God In general those parents have most reverence who most deserve it for

he that lives well cannot be despised

RULE II. Civil accomplishments frequently give rise to fame but a distinction is

to be made between fame and true honor the statesman the orator
or the poet may be famous while yet the man himself is far from
being honored

RULE III.
Glass was invented in Eng by Benalt a monk A D 664
The Roman Era U C commenced B C 753
Here is the Literary Life of ST Coleridge Esq

V.-The Dash. Copy the following sentences, and insert the dash, and such other points as are required.

RULE I. You say famour very often and I don't know exactly what it means a

famous uniform famous doings What does famous mean O why famous means Now don't you know what famous means It means

It is a word that people say It is the fashion to say it It means it means famous

RULE II. But this life is not all there is there is full surely another state abiding

us And if there is what is thy prospect O remorseless obdurate Thou shalt hear it would be thy wisdom to think thou now hearest the sound of that trumpet which shall awake the dead Return O yet return to the Father of mercies and live

The future pleases Why The present pains
But that's a secret yes which all men know

VI.-Note of Interrogation. Copy the following sentences, and insert the note of interrogation, and such other points as are required.

RULE I.
Does nature bear a tyrant's breast

Is she the friend of stern control
Wears she the despot's purple vest

Or fetters she the free-born soul
Why should a man whose blood is warm within
Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster
Who art thou courteous stranger and from whence
Why roam thy steps to this abandon'd dale

RULE II.
Who bid the stork Columbus-like explore
Heavens not his own and worlds unknown before
Who calls the council states the certain day
Who forms the phalanx and who points the way

RULE III.
Ask of thy mother Earth why oaks are made
Taller and stronger than the weeds they shade
They asked me who I was and whither I was going

VII.-Note of Exclamation. Copy the folloring sentences, and insert the note of exclamation, and such other points as are necessary.

RULE I.
Alas how is that rugged heart forlorn
Behold the victor vanquish'd by the worm
Bliss sublunary bliss proud words and vain

RULE II.
O Popular Applause what heart of man
Is proof against thy sweet seducing charms
More than thy balm 0 Gilead heals the wound

RULE III.
How often have I loitered o'er thy green
Where humble happiness endear'd each scene
What black despair what horror fills his heart

VIII.-Marks of Parenthesis. Copy the following sentences, and insert the marks of parenthesis, and such other points as are necessary.

RULE I.
And all the question wrangle e'er so long
Is only this If God has placed him wrong
And who what God foretells who speaks in things
Still louder than in words shall dare deny

RULE II.
Say was it virtue more though Heav'n ne'er gave
Lamented Digby sunk thee to the grave
Where is that thrift that avarice of time
O glorious avarice thought of death inspires
And oh the last last what can words express
Thought reach the last last silence of a friend

IX.-Promiscuous. Copy the following sentences, and insert the points which they require. As one of them opened his sack he espied his money They cried out the more exceedingly Crucify him The soldiers counsel was to kill the prisoners It is my son's coat an evil beast hath devoured him Peace of all worldly blessings is the most valuable By this time the very foundation was removed The only words he uttered were I am a Roman citizen Some distress either felt or feared gnaws like a worm How then must I determine Have I no interest If I have not I am sta

tioned here to no purpose Harris In the fire the destruction was so swift sudden vast and miserable as to

have no parallel in story
Dionysius the tyrant of Sicily was far from being happy
I ask now Verres what thou hast to advance
Excess began and sloth sustains the trade
Fame can never reconcile a man to a death bed
They that sail on the sea tell of the danger
Be doers of the word and not hearers only
The storms of wint’ry time will quickly pass
Here hope that smiling angel stands
Disguise I see thou art a wickedness

There are no tricks in plain and simple faith
True love strikes root in reason passion's foe
Two gods divide them all Pleasure and Gain
I am satisfied My son has done his duty
Remember Almet the vision which thou hast seen
I beheld an enclosure beautiful as the gardens of paradise
The knowledge which I have received I will communicate
But I am not yet happy and therefore I despair
Wretched mortals said I to what purpose are you busy
Bad as the world is respect is always paid to virtue
In a word he views men in the clear sunshine of charity
This being the case I am astonished and amazed
Yet at the same time the man himself undergoes a change
You heroes regard nothing but glory
Take care lest while you strive to reach the top you fall
Proud and presumptuous they can brook no opposition
Nay some awe of religion may still subsist
Then said he Lo I come to do thy will o God
As for me behold I am in your hand
Now I Paul myself beseech you
He who lives always in public cannot live to his own soul whereas ho

who retires remains calm
Therefore behold I even I will utterly forget you
This text speaks only of those to whom it speaks
Yea he warmeth himself and saith Aha I am warm
King Agrippa believest thou the prophets

To whom can riches give repute or trust
Content or pleasure but the good and just Pope
To him no high no low no great no small
He fills he bounds connects and equals all Id
Reason's whole pleasure all the joys of sense
Lie in three words health peace and competence Id
Not so for once indulg'd they sweep the main
Deaf to the call or hearing hear in vain Anon
Say will the falcon stooping from above
Smit with her varying plumage spare the dove Pope
Throw Egypt's by and offer in its stead
Offer the crown on Berenice's head Id
Falsely luxurious will not man awake
And springing from the bed of sloth enjoy
The cool the fragrant and the silent hour T'homson

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