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1785 Tin ore or cassiterite, and black Free...

Free..

Free. oxide of tin.60 1786 Tin in bars, blocks, or pigs, and Free..

Free..

Free.
grain or granulated and scrap
tin, including scrap tin plate.80
Alloys in chief value of tin, n. Free.

Free 91

10 per cent.91 S. p. f. 1787 Tobacco stems not cut, ground, or Free..

Free..

Free. pulverized.92 1788 Truffles, fresh, or dried or other- Free..

25 per cent. 242 cents per lb.93 wise prepared or preserved. 1789 Turmeric.

Free
Free.

Free. 1790 Turtles.

Free
Free

Free. 1791 Typewriters.

Free
Free.

Free. 1792 Uranium, oxide, and salts of.

Free
Free

Free.
1793
Urea

Free
35 per cent.

25 per cent. 1794 Vegetable tallow

Free.
Free

Free. 1795 Wafers, not edible.

Free.
Free

Free. 1796 Wax: Animal, vegetable, or mineral, Free.

Free

Free. n. s. p. f. 1797 Disks of soft wax, commonly known Free.

Free.

10 per cent.84
as master records, for use in the
manufacture of sound records
foi export purposes.
Metal matrices obtained there- Free.

Free.

20 per cent.95 from. 1798 Wearing apparel, articles of personal Free 96.

Free 97

Free.97
adornment, toilet articles, and
similar personal effects of persons
arriving in the United States; but
this exemption shall include only
such articles as were actually
owned by them and in their pos-
session abroad at the time of or
prior to their departure from a
foreign country, and as are neces-
sary and appropriate for the wear
and use of such persons and are in-
tended for such wear and use, and
shall not be held to apply to mer-
chandise or articles intended for

other persons or for sale: 80 Provided, That there shall be imposed and paid upon cassiterite, or black oxide of tin, a duty of 4 cents per pound, and upon bar, block, pig tin and grain or granulated, a duty of 6 cents per pound when it is made to appear to the satisfaction of the President of the United States that the mines of the United States are producing 1,500 tons of cassiterite and bar, block, and pig tin per year. The President shall make known this fact by proclamation, and thereafter said duties shall go into effect. (Acts of 1930 and 1922.)

Provided, That there shall be imposed and paid upon cassiterite, or black oxide of tin, and upon bar, block, pig tin, and grain or granulated, a duty of 4 cents per pound when it is made to appear to the satisfaction of the President of the United States that the mines of the United States are producing 1,500 tons of cassiterite and bar, block, and pig tin per year. The President shall make known this fact by proclamation, and thereafter said duties shall go into effect. (Act of 1913.)

91 Metals, unwrought, n. S. p. f.
92 “Not cut, ground, or pulverized.” (Acts of 1922 and 1930.)
93 Including the weight of immediate containers.
04 Manufactures of wax, n. S. p. f.
95 Manufactures of base metal.

36 Provided, That all jewelry and similər articles of personal adoinment having a value of $300 or more, brought in by a nonresident of the United States, shall, if sold within three years after the date of the arrival of such person in the United States, be liable to duty at the rate oi rates in force at the time of such sale, to be paid by such person: Provided further, That in case of residents of the United States returning from abroad all wearing apparel, personal and household effects, and in the case of individuals returning from abroad, all professional books, implements, instruments, and tools of trade, occupation, or employment, taken by them out of the United States to foreign countries shall be admitted free of duty, without regard to their value, upon their identity being established under appropriate rules and regulations to be prescribed by the Secretary of the Tre 7: Provided further, That up to but not exceeding $100 in value of articles acquired abroad by such residents of the United States for personal or household use or as souvenirs or curios, but not bought on commission or intended for sale, shall be admitted free of duty: Provided further, That a resident of the United States shall not take advantage of the exemption herein granted within a period of 30 days from the last exemption claimed.

97 Provided, That all jewelry and similar articles of personal adornment having a value of $300 or more, brought in by a nonresident of the United States, shall, if sold within three years after the date of the arrival of such person in the United States, be liable to duty at the rate or rates in force at the time of such sale, to be paid by such person (act of 1922): Provided further, That in case cf residents of the United States returning from abroad all wearing apparel, personal and household effects taken by them out of the United States to foreign countries shall be admitted free of duty, without regard to their value, upon their identity being established under appropriate rules and regulations to be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury: Provided further, That up to but not exceeding $100 in value of articles acquired abroad by such residents of the United States for personal or household use or as souvenirs or curios, but not bought on commisson or intended for sale, shall be admitted free of duty (acts of 1913, 1922).

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1799
Whalebone, unmanufactured. Free

Free

Free. 1800 All barbed wire, whether plain or Free.

Free.

Free.
galvanized.
1801
Witherite, crude, unground.

Free
Free.

Free. 1802 Wood charcoal.

Free.
Free

Free. 1803 Wood:

(1) Timber-
Hewn, sided, or squared,

Free. 98
otherwise than by sawing.
Round, used for spars or in

Free.
building wharves.
Sawed lumber and timber,

Free.
not further manufactured
than planed, and tongued

and grooved.99
All the foregoing not specially | Free..

Free..
provided for.

(Free. (2) Logs..

$1 per 11,000 ft.

Free. b. m.

(10 per cent ? Timber, round, unmanufac

Free.

Free.
tured.
Pulpwoods.

Free

Free.
Firewood, handle bolts,

Free

Free.
shingle bolts.
Gun blocks for gun stocks,

Free..

Free. rough hewn or sawed or

planed on one side. Laths.

Free.

Free.
All the foregoing not specially Free.

provided for.
1804 Posts,3 railroad ties, and tele-
phone, trolley, electric-light, and

Free
Free

10 per cent.
telegraph poles of cedar or other

(Free.3
woods.
1805 Pickets, palings, and staves of wood

Free
Free

Free.
of all kinds.
Hoops..

Free
Free.

15 per cent. 1806 Woods: Sticks of partridge, hair Free..

Free.

Free.
wood, pimento, orange, myrtle,
bamboo, rattan, india malacca
joints, and other woods not spe-
cially provided for, in the rough,
or not further advanced than cut
into lengths suitable for sticks for
umbrellas, parasols, sunshades,
whips, fishing rods, or walking

canes.
98 Includes sawed timber.

"! Provided, That if there is imported into the United States any of the foregoing lumber, planed on one or more sides and tongued and grooved, manufactured in or exported from any country, dependency, province, or other subdivision of government which imposes a duty upon such lumber exported from the United States, the President may enter into negotiations with such country, dependency, province, or other subdivision of government to secure the removal of such duty, and if such duty is not removed he may by proclamation declare such failure of negotiations, and in such proclamation shall state the facts upon which his action is taken together with the rates imposed, and make declaration that like and equal rates shall be forthwith imposed as hereinafter provided; whereupon, and until such duty is removed, there shall be levied, collected, and paid upon such lumber, when imported directly or indirectly from such country, dependency, province, or other subdivision of government, a duty equal to the duty imposed by such country, dependency, province, or other subdivision of government upon such lumber imported from the United States. (Acts of 1930 and 1922.)

1 Logs of fir, spruce, cedar, or Western hemlock: Provided, That any such class of logs cut from any particular class of lands shall be exempt from such duty is imported from any country, dependency, province, or other subdivision of government which has, at no time during the 12 months immediately preceding their importation into the United States, maintained any embargo, prohibition, or other restriction (whether by law, order, regulation, contractual relation or otherwise, directly or indirectly), upon the exportation of such class of logs from such country, dependency, province, or other subdivision of government, if cut from such class of lands.

2 Cedar, commercially known as Spanish cedar, lignum-vitæ, lancewood, ebony, box, granadilla, mahogany, rosewood, satinwood, Japanese white oak, and Japanese maple, in the log.

3 Paving posts (acts of 1913 and 1922). Posts, 10 per cent (act of 1922). Fence posts, free (act of 1913.) 4 Manufactures of wood, n. s. p. f.

Schedule 16—Continued

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1807 Original paintings in oil, mineral, Free...

Freo..

Free.
water, or other colors, pastels,
original drawings and sketches in
pen, ink, pencil, or water colors,
artists' proof etchings unbound,
and engravings and woodcuts
unbound, original sculptures or
statuary, including not more
than two replicas or reproduc-
tions of the same; but the terms
“sculpture” and “statuary” as
used in this paragraph shall be
understood to include profes-
sional productions of sculptors
only, whether in round or in relief,
in bronze, marble, stone, terra
cotta, ivory, wood, or metal, or
whether cut, carved, or otherwise
wrought by hand from the solid
block or mass of marble, stone, or
alabaster, or from metal, or cast
in bronze or other metal or sub-
stance, or from wax or plaster,
made as the professional pro-
ductions of sculptors only; and
the words “painting," "draw-
ing, 5" "sketch,5" "sculpture”,
and "statuary” as used in this
paragraph shall not be understood
to include any articles of utility
or for industrial use, nor such as
are made wholly or in part by
stenciling or any other me-
chanical process; and the words
"etchings," "engravings," and
“woodcuts” as used in this para-
graph shall be understood to in-
clude only such as are printed by
hand from plates or blocks etched
or engraved with hand tools and
not such as are printed from
plates or blocks etched or en-
graved by photochemical or other

mechanical processes.
1808 Works of art, drawings, engravings, Free....

Free.

Free.
photographic pictures, and philo-
sophical and scientific apparatus
brought by professional artists,
lecturers, or scientists arriving
from abroad for use by them tem-
porarily for exhibition and in
illustration, promotion, and en-
couragement of art, science, or
industry in the United States,
and not for sale, shall be admitted
free of duty, under such regula-
tions as the Secretary of the
Treasury shall prescribe; but
bonds shall be given for the pay-
ment to the United States of
such duties as may be imposed
by law upon any and all such
articles as shall not be exported
within 6 months after such im-

portation.7
5" Drawing" and "sketch," added in act of 1930.
6 “For industrial use," added in act of 1930.

7 Provided, That the Secretary of the Treasury may, in his discretion, extend such period for a further term of 6 months in cases where application therefor shall be made.

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1809

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1810

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Works of art, collections in illustra

tion of the progress of the arts,
sciences, agriculture, or manufac-
tures, photographs, works in terra
cotta, parian, pottery, or porce-
lain, antiquities and artistic
copies thereof in metal or other
material, imported in good faith
for exhibition at a fixed place by
any State or by any society or in-
stitution established for the en-
couragement of the arts, science,
agriculture, or education, or for a
municipal corporation, and all
like articles imported in good
faith by any society or associa-
tion, or for a municipal corpora-
tion, for the purpose of erecting a
public monument, and not in-
tended for sale nor for any other
purpose than herein expressed.8
Works of art, productions of Ameri-

can artists residing temporarily
abroad, or other works of art, in-
cluding pictorial paintings on
glass, imported expressly for pre-
sentation to a national institu-
tion or to any State or municipal
corporation or incorporated reli-
gious society, college, or other
public institution, including
stained or painted window glass
or stained or painted glass win-
dows which are works of art,
when imported to be used in
houses of worship valued at $15 or
more per square foot,' and exclud-
ing any article, in whole or in part,
molded, cast, or mechanically
wrought from metal within 20
years prior to importation; but
such exemptions shall be sub-
ject to such regulations as the
Secretary of the Treasury may

prescribe.
Works of art (except rugs and car-

pets made after the year 1700),
collections in illustration of the
progress of the arts, works in
bronze, marble, terra cotta, pa-
rian, pottery, or porcelain, ar-
tistic antiquities, and objects of
art of ornamental character or
educational value which shall
have been produced prior to the
year 1830, but the free importa-
tion of such objects shall be sub-
ject to such regulations as to proof
of antiquity as the Secretary of
the Treasury may prescribe.
Violins, violas, violoncellos, and
double basses, of all sizes, made

in the year 1800 or prior year.
Gobelin tapestries used as

wall
hangings.
Worm gut, unmanufactured
Zaffer..

1811

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1812

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1813 1814

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8 But bond shall be given, under such rules and regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe, for the payment of lawful duties which may accrue should any of the articles aforesaid be sold, transferred, or used contrary to this provision, and such articles shall be subject at any time to examination and inspection by the proper officers of the customs: Provided, That the privileges of this and the preceding paragraph shall not be allowed to associations or corporations engaged in or connected with business of a private or commercial character. 9 “Which are works of art

and when ordered after the passage of this act, valued at $15 or more per square foot," added in act of 1922.

10 Works of art (except rugs and carpets), collections in illustration of the progress of the arts, works in bronze, marble, terra cotta, parian, pottery, or porcelain, artistic antiquities, and objects of art of ornamental character or educational value which shall have been produced more than 100 years prior to the date of importation, but the free importation of such objects shall be subject to such regulations as to proof of antiquity as the Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe. 11 Dutiable as woven fabrics,

*

*

TITLE HI-SPECIAL PROVISIONS

Part I-Miscellaneous

ACT OF 1930 SEC. 301. PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.

There shall be levied, collected, and paid upon all articles coming into the United States from the Philippine Islands the rates of duty which are required to be levied, collected, and paid upon like articles imported from foreign countries:

ACT OF 1913

ACT OF 1922

SEC. IV.

Sec. 301. That there shall be levied, collected, and C. That there shall be levied, collected, and paid paid upon all articles coming into the United States upon all articles coming into the United States from from the Philippine Islands the rates of duty which the Philippine Islands the rates of duty which are are required to be levied, collected, and paid upon required to be levied, collected, and paid upon like like articles imported from foreign countries: articles imported from foreign countries: Provided, That all articles, the growth or product of or manufactured in the Philippine Islands from materials the growth or product of the Philippine Islands or of the United States, or of both, or which do not contain foreign materials to the value of more than 20 per centum of their total value, upon which no draw. back of customs duties has been allowed therein, coming into the United States from the Philippine (slands shall hereafter be admitted free of duty: Provided, That all articles, the growth or product of Provided, That all articles, the growth or product or manufactured in the Philippine Islands from ma of or manufactured in the Philippine Islands from terials the growth or product of the Philippine materials the growth or product of the Philippine Islands or of the United States, or of both, or which Islands or of the United States, or of both, or which do not contain foreign materials to the value of more do not contain foreign materials to the value of more than 20 per centum of their total value, upon which than 20 per centum of their total value, upon which no drawback of customs duties has been allowed no drawback of customs duties has been allowed therein, coming into the United States from the therein, coming into the United States from the Philippine Islands shall hereafter be admitted free Philippine Islands shall hereafter be admitted free of duty:

of duty: Provided, however, That in consideration of the exemptions aforesaid, all articles, the growth, product, or manufacture of the United States, upon which no drawback of customs duties has been allowed therein, shall be admitted to the Philippine Islands from the United States free of duty: Provided, however, That in consideration of the Provided, however, That in consideration of the exemptions aforesaid, all articles, the growth, prod exemptions aforesaid, all articles, the growth, prod. uct, or manufacture of the United States, upon uct, or manufacture of the United States, upon which no drawback of customs duties has been which no drawback of customs duties has been allowed therein, shall be admitted to the Philippine allowed therein, shall be admitted to the Philippine Islands from the United States free of duty:

Islands from the United States free of duty: And provided further, That the free admission, herein provided, of such articles, the growth, product, or manufacture of the United States, into the Philippine Islands, or of the growth, product, or manufacture, as hereinbefore defined, of the Philippine Islands into the United States, shall be conditioned upon the direct shipment thereof, under a through bill of lading, from the country of origin to the country of des. tination: Provided, That direct shipments shall include shipments in bond through foreign territory contiguous to the United States: And provided further, That the free admission, And provided further, That the free admission, herein provided, of such articles, the growth, prod herein provided, of such articles, the growth, prod. uct, or manufacture of the United States, into the uct, or manufacture of the United States, into the Philippine Islands, or of the growth, product, or Philippine Islands, or of the growth, product, or manufacture, as hereinbefore defined, of the Philip manufacture, as herein before defined, of the Philippine Islands into the United States, shall be con pine Islands into the United States, shall be conditioned upon the direct shipment thereof, under a ditioned upon the direct shipment thereof, under a through bill of lading, from the country of origin through bill of lading, from the country of origin to the country of destination: Provided, That direct to the country of destination: Provided, That direct shipment shall include shipments in bond through shipments shall include shipments in bond through foreign territory contiguous to the United States: foreign territory contiguous to the United States: Provided, however, That if such articles become unpacked while en route by accident, wreck, or other casualty, or so damaged as to necessitate their repacking, the same shall be admitted free of duty upon satisfactory proof that the unpacking occurred through accident or necessity and that the merchandise involved is the identical merchandise originally shipped from the United States or the Philippine Islands, as the case may be, and that its condition has not been changed except for such damage as may have been sustained:

Provided, however, That if such articles become unpacked while en route by accident, wreck, or other casualty, or so damaged as to necessitate their repacking, the same shall be admitted free of duty upon satisfactory proof that the unpacking occurred through accident or necessity and that the merchandise involved is the identical merchandise originally shipped from the United States or the Philippine Islands, as the case may be, and that its condition has not been changed except for such damage as may have been sustained:

Provided, however, That if such articles become unpacked while en route by accident, wreck, or other casualty, or so damaged as to necessitate their repacking, the same shall be admitted free of duty upon satisfactory proof that the unpacking occurred through accident or necessity and that the mer. chandise involved is the identical merchandise originally shipped from the United States or the Philippine Islands, as the case may be, and that its condition has not been changed except for such damage as may have been sustained:

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