Walks in Oxford;: Comprising an Original, Historical, and Descriptive Account of the Colleges, Halls, and Public Buildings of the University: with an Introductory Outline of the Academical History of Oxford. To which are Added, a Concise History and Description of the City, and Delineations in the Environs of Oxford, Parte1

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W. Baxter, 1818 - 388 páginas
 

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Página 193 - He was a scholar, and a ripe and good one ; Exceeding wise, fair spoken, and persuading : Lofty and sour to them that loved him not ; But, to those men that sought him, sweet as summer...
Página 169 - That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the ruins of lona...
Página 141 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground; Another race the following spring supplies; They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay; So flourish these, when those are pass'd away. But if thou still persist to search my birth, Then hear a tale that fills the spacious earth. "A city stands on Argos...
Página 193 - He was a scholar, and a ripe and good one; Exceeding wise, fair spoken and persuading: Lofty and sour to them that lov'd him not, But to those men that sought him, sweet as summer. And though he were unsatisfied in getting, Which was a sin, yet in bestowing, madam, He was most princely...
Página 258 - Heads of Colleges only, and by no others, in the room adjoining to the PrintingHouse, between the hours of ten in the morning and two in the afternoon, to preach eight Divinity Lecture Sermons, the year following, at St. Mary's in Oxford, between the commencement of the last month in Lent Term, and the end of the third week in Act Term.
Página 169 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings.
Página 91 - This is the emblem of a good tutor or fellow of a college, who is set to watch over the youth of the society, and by whose prudence they are to be led through the dangers of their first entrance into the world.
Página 176 - What! my lord, shall we build houses, and provide livelihoods for a company of monks, whose end and fall we ourselves may live to see ? No, no, it is more meet a great deal, that We should have care to provide for the increase of learning, and for such as who by their learning shall do good to the church and commonwealth.
Página 146 - No more the matchless skill I call unkind, That strives to disenchant my cheated mind. For when again I view thy chaste design, The just proportion, and the genuine line; Those native portraitures of Attic art, That from the lucid surface seem to start; Those tints, that steal no glories from the day, Nor ask the sun to lend his streaming ray...
Página xxxvi - ... yielded a harvest of extraordinary good and sound knowledge in all parts of learning, and many who were wickedly introduced applied themselves to the study of good learning and the practice of virtue...

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