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FATALITIES

1920 1922 1924 1926

1930 1932 1934 1936 1938 1940 1942 1944 1946 1948 FIGURE 5.-Fatalities in major gas or dust explosions in bituminous-coal and anthracite

mines of the United States.

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Comparative fatalities and fatality rates per million tons of coal produced

during the first 4 months of 1948 and 1949, respectively

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Number of fatal and nonfatal injuries in coal mines in the United States

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1933. 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1910 1941 1942 1943 1944. 1945 1 1946 1 1947 1 1948 1

867 1, 204 1,072 1, 245 1, 225 1, 124

936 800 990 870

974 1,165 1,015

1 Figures are preliminary and subject to revision,

Fatalities and a comparison of fatality rates based on man-hours exposure in

underground bituminous coal mines, by employment groups

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1 These fatalities occurred in underground bituminous coal mines employing less than 25 men.

NOTE.-These data cover only underground employees. They do not include surface employees nor strip-mine employees. The man-hours are based on working time, and not on portal-to-portal time.

Number of men killed in major gas and dust explosions in coal mines of the

United States

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APPENDIX C.–Violations of State mining laws indicated in reports on Federal

coal-mine inspections made during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1948

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1, 298 283

37

109 2,825 181 36 31 205 188

APPENDIX D.—Record of compliance with recommendations of Federal coal

mine inspectors, by States

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19-month period prior to the Centralia disaster.
*3-month period subsequent to the Centralia disaster.

APPENDIX E.—Indication of imminent dangers in Federal coal-mine inspection

reports covering the 12-month period beginning Apr. 8, 1948, by States

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TESTIMONY OF A. W. DICKINSON, REPRESENTING THE AMERICAN

MINING CONGRESS

Mr. DICKINSON. Mr. Chairman, I have here a brief statement which, with your permission, I would like to read.

Mr. KELLEY. Proceed when you are ready.

Mr. DICKINSON. My name is A. W. Dickinson. I represent the American Mining Congress, which is a national organization representative of all branches of the mining industry throughout the United States, including anthracite and bituminous coal. I am a mining engineer actively engaged in the bituminous coal industry ever since 1908 as an engineer, safety engineer, superintendent, manager, and owner.

The position of the American Mining Congress on the legislation now before your committee is stated in the following resolution unanimously adopted at our fiftieth annual meeting and approved by our board of directors January 26 of this year:

The Bureau of Mines should not be made the instrument for further Federal encroachment on the rights of the States by delegating to it police powers covering the operation of mines.

The members of the American Mining Congress have been vitally interested in the safety movement for many years and in fact participated in the campaign which resulted in the creation of the Bureau

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