Geographical, historical, political, philosophical and mechanical essays. The first, containing An analysis of a general map of the middle British colonies in America

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B. Franklin, and D. Hall. MDCCLV. And sold by R. and J. Dodsley, London, 1755 - 32 páginas
 

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Página 10 - As for the Branches of Ohio, which head in the New Virginia*, I am particularly obliged to Dr. THOMAS...
Página 8 - Peaks overtopping one but stretch in long uniform Ridges, scarce Half a Mile perpendicular in any Place above the intermediate Vallies. Their name is expressive of their Extent, though no Doubt, not in a literal Sense. In some Places, as towards the Kaats Kill...
Página 31 - Ohio included in this Map, we may reckon it as great a Prize, as has ever yet been contended for, between two Nations...
Página 29 - It has below the mountains, especially for 15 miles from the mouth, very good land. And here is a visible effect of the difference of climate from the upper parts of Ohio. Here the...
Página 7 - This consists of Veins of different Kinds of Soil and Substrata, some Scores of Miles in Length, and in some Places overlaid with little Ridges and Chains of Hills. The Declivity of the Whole gives great Rapidity to the Streams; and our violent Gusts of Rain have...
Página 31 - It is not as two Nations at War, contending the one for the other's Habitations; where the Conquered, on Submission, would be admitted to partake of the Privileges of the Conquerors; but for a vast Country, exceeding in Extent and good Land all the European Dominions of Britain, France and Spain, almost destitute of Inhabitants...
Página 7 - Westward as far as this Map extends, and probably to the Extremity of Georgia, may be denominated the Lower Plains, and consists of Soil washt down from above, and Sand accumulated from the Ocean. Where these Plains are not penetrated by Rivers, they are a white SeaSand, about twenty Feet deep, and perfectly barren, as no Mixture of Soil helps to enrich them. But the Borders of the Rivers, which descend...
Página 14 - ... were bent upon finding fault with every measure planned by general Shirley. The advocates for the French claim relied much on a late map of the middle British colonies, and two pamphlets published by Lewis Evans. " The French, says he, being in possession of fort Frontenac at the peace of Ryswick, which they attained during their war with the confederates, gives them an undoubted title to the acquisition of the north-west side of St. Lawrence river, from thence to their settlement at Montreal.
Página 10 - Routs [sic] across the Country, as well as the Situation of Indian Villages, trading Places, the Creeks that fall into Lake Erie, and other affairs relating to Ohio and its Branches, are from a great Number of Informations of Traders and others, and especially of a very intelligent Indian called The Eagle, who had a good Notion of Distances, Bearings and Delineating.33 So, neither Pownall nor Evans had personal observation or experience or survey of the area.

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