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Senator Van Nuys. You had some conversation with her at the time and place she mentioned?

Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes.

Senator Van Nuys. What did she say to you as to where she spent the evening?

Mrs. HAYMAN. She told me she had been to Salisbury to the movies.

Senator Van Nuys. When did you go up town that night?

Mrs. HAYMAN. I was down at my husband's place of business, I suppose, around 8 o'clock that night.

Senator Van Nuys. Do you know at what hour the lynching is supposed to have occurred ?

Mrs. HAYMAN. No; I really do not. Senator Van Nuys. Where was your husband's place of business with reference to the jail?

Mrs. HAYMAN. About two blocks from the jail.

Senator Van Nuys. How long did you stay at his place of business?

Mrs. HAYMAN. I stayed there until after 10 o'clock.

Senator Van Nuys. You knew there was a lynching going on, did you not?

Mrs. HAYMAN. I certainly did.
Senator Van Nuys. There were great crowds in the street!
Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes, sir.
Senator Van Nuys. Milling around!
Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes, sir.

Senator Van Nuys. Were you out on the sidewalk or in your husband's store!

Mrs. HAYMAN. I was standing in front of the store.
Senator Van Nuys. What did you see?

Mrs. HAYMAN. I just saw a crowd of people, and that is about all I can say.

Senator Vax Nrys. Did you see them go to the jail?

Mrs. Harmax. They were milling around, as you called it, and I don't know where they were going.

Senator Vax Vrys Were they going in the direction of the jail?
Mrs. Harmax. Some were and some were not.
Senator Vax Vrys Did you know any of them!
Mrs. Harxan. No; I did not.
Senator Vax Vrys. Were you raised in that community!
Mrs. HYLAX, No, sir.
Senator Vax Sres. How long have you lived there!
Mrs. HAYVAN, Two years.
Sinator Van Nuys How large is the town!

Urs Harma. I don't knew. I would say the population is arouni or a thousand people.

Senator Lax Surs You know most of the people in the town, do Mrs Haryas. No: I can't ay that I do.

Senator Vas Nuis You know quite a percentage of the people in the towni

Mr Harya. Yes: I know quite a number.

Senator Van Nuys You do not remember anybody that you w milling around in the crowd that night!

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Mrs. HAYMAN. No, sir.

Senator Van Nuys. Does not that appeal to you as a little peculiar, that you would not remember anybody?

Mrs. HAYMAN. Absolutely it does, but it is the truth.
Senator Van Nuys. How do you explain that peculiar situation?

Mrs. HAYMAN. They were people I have never seen before, and I suppose they were people from out of town.

Senator Van Nuys. The crowd you saw milling around and finally going in the direction of the jail were strangers to you?

Mrs. HAYMAN. Strangers to me.

Senator Van Nuys. You did not see a single person in that crowd that you knew?

Mrs. HAYMAN. No, sir.
Senator Van Nuys. Were you ever subpenaed before a grand jury?
Mrs. Hayman. No, sir.

Senator Van Nuys. You cannot give the subcommittee the name of anyone, man or woman, that you saw in that crowd that night?

Mrs. HAYMAN. No; I could not.

Senator Van Nuys. Is this matter still discussed in your community?

Mrs. HAYMAN. Not in our home. I could not say about outside. Senator Van Nuys. Among your friends there, is it discussed? Mrs. HAYMAN. No, sir.

Senator Van Nuys. Do you go to your husband's place of business frequently?

Mrs. HAYMAN. No; I seldom go there.
Senator Van Nuys. How did you happen to go there that night?

Mrs. HAYMAN. Because when he saw the crowd of people down there he was afraid that probably something would happen at the store, and he thought he would stay down there and try to keep things straight.

Senator Van Nuys. Did he send for you to go down?

Mrs. HAYMAN. No. I went because there was no one home, and I was not going to stay in the house alone.

Senator Van Nuys. Where was your house with reference to your husband's place of business?

Mrs. HAYMAN. It is about, I would say, two or three blocks from the store.

Senator Van Nuys. Further away from the jail than the place of business?

Mrs. HAYMAN. No; I would say it is only about a block and a half away from the jail around in the other direction, around the back street.

Senator Van Nuys. Even before you left your home there was such a crowd there on the streets and around that you became fearful and went down to your husband's place of business? Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes.

Senator Van Nuys. You must evidently have passed a great many people, then, in going from your home to his place of business. Ís that right?

Mrs. HAYMAN. No; I would not say I passed a great many people. They were all going in the other direction.

Senator Van Nuys. They were going past you ?
Mrs. HAYAN. No.

Senator Van Nuys. Did you go through any crowd!
Mrs. HAYMAN. No, sir. I tried to steer clear of them.

Senator Van Nuys. But in that trip from your home to your husband's place of business you saw no one that you knew.

Mrs. HAYMAN. No.

Senator Van Nuys. How did those strangers get in town? Where were their automobiles or horses or other means of conveyanceparked around the streets, or where were they?

Mrs. HAYMAN. Some of them were parked on the streets. At the time I left the house there did not seem to be so terribly many cars parked around the streets. I don't know how they got there.

Senator Van Nuys. There was no evidence of an unusual number of automobiles parked around the streets ?

Mrs. HAYMAN. Later on; yes.

Senator Van Nuys. I mean during the time preceding the lynching. Do you know where they came from? Mrs. HAYMAN. I haven't any idea.

Senator Van Nuys. Did you ever find out? Did you ever hear anybody say?

Mrs. HAYMAN. No; I never heard anybody say.

Senator Van Nuys. Did you ever talk over your testimony with anyone? Did you ever talk it over with your husband ?

Mrs. HAYMAN. No, sir.

Senator Van Nuys. You think there has been a bona-fide effort in that community to try to identify the leaders of this mob?

Mrs. HAYMAN. I really couldn't say. I have never been in communication with anyone and never heard anyone discuss that part of it.

Senator Van Nuys. Senator McCarran, do you want to ask any questions?

Senator McCARRAN. What time did you leave your home to go down to the store?

Mrs. HAYMAN. I think it was around 8 o'clock.

Senator McCARRAN. Had your husband left the house to go down to the store?

Mrs. HAYMAN. No, sir.
Senator McCARRAN. Did he go down with you?
Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes, sir.
Senator McCarrax. He went down to the store with you?
Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes, sir.

Senator McCarran. There was no crowd or large assemblage at that time, at 8 o'clock.

Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes, sir.
Senator McCARRAN. There was a crowd?
Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes, sir.
Senator McCARRAX. Could you see the crowd from your house!
Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes; down by the jail.
Senator McCARRAN. You could see them at the jail ?
Mrs. HAYMAX. Yes, sir.

Senator McCarrAN. Were there automobiles parked around on the street at that time?

Mrs. HayMAX. Some few.
Senator McCarran. Some few ?

Mrs. Hayman. Yes. I noticed when I came home that more cars were parked around the streets.

Senator McCarran. What caused you to be fearful, so much so that you went down to the store! Give us your impression.

Mrs. HaYMAN. Just afraid, I suppose, to stay in the house alone.
Senator MOCARRAN. Why were you afraid?
Mrs. HAYMAN. No particular reason.

Senator MoCARRAN. The mere fact that there might have been an unusual crowd there did not cause you to have fear?

Mrs. Hayman. No, sir.

Senator McCARRAN. There was something else that caused you not to want to stay there alone?

Mrs. HAYMAN. I didn't like to stay in the house alone that night.

Senator McCARRAN. Do you always go down to the store in the evenings!

Mrs. HAYMAN. If there is no one else home—that is, if my husband goes down there. Of course, he does not go every night.

Senator MOCARRAN. This night he did go down because of the unusual crowd in town?

Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes.
Senator McCARRAN. Is that true?
Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes, sir.

Senator McCARRAN. Is it not true that at that time the cause for the crowd was discussed between yourself and your husband !

Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes.
Senator MoCARRAN. Before you left home?
Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes.

Senator McCARRAN. In other words, before you left home you had an intimation there was going to be some trouble at the jail?

Mrs. HAYMAN. Not until I saw the crowd coming in town.
Senator McCARRAN. You saw the crowd coming in town?
Mrs. HAYMAN. Some few of them.

Senator McCarran. Then you were aware that there was a crowd coming into town!

Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes; you couldn't help but notice them.

Senator McCARRAN. And your husband and you discussed the probability of trouble at the jail ?

Mrs. HAYMAN. We thought that was probably what it was,
Senator McCARRAN. You thought that was what it was?
Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes.

Senator McCARRAN. It must have come to you beforehand, before that, that there might possibly be a lynching. What caused you to think there would be a lynching was because you saw the crowd?

Mrs. Hayman. I didn't think there was really going to be a lynching when I saw the crowd. Of course, it was only natural that we feared trouble.

Senator McC'ARRAN. You did fear trouble?

Mrs. Hayman. Absolutely; when I saw the crowd; when we saw the people coming into town—so many of them.

Senator McCARRAN. Did they pass your house when coming into town?

Mr. HAYMAN. On the opposite side of the street, on their way down to the jail; some of them did, but not all of them.

Senator McCARRAN. Were there many of them walking!

Mrs. HAYMAN. All of them were walking.

Senator McCARRAN. Did you recognize any of those who passed your house?

Mrs. HAYMAN. No; I could not. It was dark and there is only one street light there, and, of course, you couldn't recognize anyone across the street in the dark.

Senator McCARRAN. In going to the store in company with your husband did you pass close to those who were in the crowd?

Mrs. HAYMAN. No, sir.
Senator McCARRAN. Did you intentionally avoid the crowd ?
Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes, sir.

Senator McCARRAN. You went around rather than go through the crowd?

Mrs. HAYMAN. Yes. Of course, we went down the main street and the crowd hadn't congregated on the main street. They were not standing around up there at that particular time.

Senator McCARRAN. How far is the vacant space where the lynching took place from the jail !

Mrs. HAYMAN. I really don't know. I don't know where the lynching took place.

Senator McČARRAN. You do not know where it took place?
Mrs. HAYMAN. No, sir.

Senator McCARRAN. Has it ever been told to you where the body was found? Did anyone ever tell you where the body was found ?

Mrs. HAYMAN. They just told me that the body had been dragged up Main Street, and they brought it back and left it out in the street in front of the courthouse.

Senator McCARRAN. How long was it after the lynching that you saw Mrs. Thompson !

Mrs. HAYMAN. It was about a quarter of 10 I saw Mrs. Thompson; I would say between 9:30 and 10 o'clock. I couldn't say exactly what time it was.

Senator McCARRAN. The incident was all over then, was it?
Mrs. Hayman. Yes, sir.
Senator McCARRAN. Your husband's store fronts on Main Street?
Mrs. HAYMAN. No; it does not.

Senator MoCARRAN. You remained in the store all the time from the time you went down there!

Mrs. HAYMAN. No.
Senator McCARRAX. What did you do?
Mrs, HAYMAX. I was out in front on the platform.
Senator McCARRAX. You remained there?

Mrs. Haymax. Yes; right in front of the door on the platform was where I stayed.

Senator McCARRAX. Was your husband there with you?
Mrs. HAYMAX. Yes.
Senator McCARRAN. Did others come up on the platform!

Mrs. HAYMAN. Xo; no one that I know of, and none of the strangers came up there.

Senator McCARRAX. How close were the strangers to you!
Mrs. Harmax. Walking in the middle of the street.
Senator MOC'ARRAX. You could not identify any of them!
Mrs. HAYMAX. No, sir: I could not.
Senator McCARRAN. Was it dark there?

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