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THE

INTRODUCTORY DISCOURSE,

AND THE

LECTURES

DELIVERED BEFORE THE

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INSTRUCTION,

AT

WORCESTER, (MASS.) AUGUST, 1837.

INCLUDING

THE JOURNAL OF PROCEEDINGS,

AND

A LIST OF THE OFFICERS.

PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE BOARD OF CENSORS,

BOSTON:

JAMES MUNROE & COMPANY..

1838.

PRESS

OF 1.

R.

BUTTS ........SCHOOL

STREET.

most beneficial influence on Modern Literature, 27—preliminary remarks

on the design of intellectual education, 28—first direct advantage of Clas-

sical Learning; a means of access to the knowledge contained in the writ-

ings of the Ancients,-notice of the nature of the treasures which these

writings contain, 30- this advantage of immense value at the first revival

of learning in Western Europe—but not of equal value in our own times,

32—too much stress should not be laid upon it as an argument in favor of

the study of the Classics in the present age, 32—second direct advantage of

Classical Learning ; it serves as a key to Modern Literature-third advan-

tage ; it enables us to trace with greater satisfaction the etymology of a

large class of words in our own language, 35—and in the languages of

Southern Europe, and hence facilitates the acquisition of these languages,

36—but the most important advantages of Classical Learning are of an indi-

rect nature, arising from its instrumentality in training the mental powers,

36—appeal to experience as to its utility for this purpose, 37—two great

objects of intellectual training; to prepare for the investigation of truth, and

for the communication of knowledge to others, 38—the latter species of

training may advantageously be carried forward in advance of the former;

the power of communication receiving its full developement earlier than

the reasoning powers, 39—classical instruction considered as a means of pro-

moting the first of these objects, 40-futility of the objection that it trains

the pupil only to the examination of words, not of things, or of ideas, 41-

comparison of Classical Learning with Geometry as regards this point, 42—

Classical instruction considered as a means of training for the purpose of

communicating knowledge, 43—inference as to the manner in which the

Classics should be taught the objection that the study of the Classics tends

to encourage licentiousness considered, 44-refutation of the objection that

the study of the Classics injures the cause of Christianity—and of the ob-

jection that it inspires bloody and revengeful feelings, 45—in conclusion, a

more extensive cultivation of Classical Learning recommended, but not to

the exclusion of other useful studies, 46.

Low condition of human education, as it must appear to some superior

intelligence, now for the first time, introduced to our world, 73—definition

and real design of education-importance of correct education beginning to

be more justly appreciated-much yet remains to be done, 74_adaptation

of the natural world to the improvement and happiness of our race-exam.

ination of the order in which, beginning at the creation of man, natural

objects force themselves upon his attention, 75—the true value of know-

ledge consists in the immense power which it confers, and not in the mere

collecting of facts and theories-error of past ages in this respect--objects

of physical science, 77—two distinct branches, natural philosophy and natu-

ral history-comparative neglect of the latter-importance of a closer and

more general attention to it, among those who are interested in education,

78—the admiration of natural objects almost instinctive,—the indulgence of

this taste favorable to civilization and moral improvement, 79—why then, is

the study so much neglected ?--it is peculiarly interesting to children, 80–

causes of the prevalent mistake respecting its utility-error on the part

of parents, 81-anecdote of Audubon-error in schools, 82—botany, &c,

how pursued in them, 84-evil consequences of this 85—the teacher should

not depend too much upon text-books, but should himself be an adept, 86%

and should aim chiefly to inspire a taste-text-books defective, and must

necessarily be so-want of American works—foreign text-books ill-adapted

to the schools of this country, 87—the study of the natural sciences favora.

ble to Christianity-worthy, therefore, of encouragement from the clergy-

allusion to Newton, Priestly, Paley, Cuvier, 88–conclusion, 89.

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