Letters on the scenery of Wales

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Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, 1821 - 192 páginas

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Página 72 - Loved the Church so well, and gave so largely to it, They thought it should have canopied their bones Till doomsday ; — but all things have their end — Churches and cities, which have diseases like to men, Must have like death which we have.
Página 77 - He is now numbered with the classics of the art, though little more than the fifth part of a century has elapsed since death relieved him from the apathy of cognoscenti, the envy of rivals, and the neglect of a tasteless public ; for Wilson, whose works will soon command prices as proud as those of Claude, Poussin, or Elzheimer, resembled the last most in his fate, and lived and died nearer to indigence than ease.
Página 110 - But leading all his life at home in peace, Always in sight of his own smoke, no seas, No other seas he knows, no other torrent, Than that which waters with its silver current His native meadows ; and that very earth Shall give him burial which first gave him birth. ' To summon timely sleep, he doth not need...
Página 126 - Mr. Parry* has been here, and scratched out such ravishing blind harmony, such tunes of a thousand years old, with names enough to choke you, as have set all this learned body a-dancing, and inspired them with due reverence for my old Bard, his countryman, whenever he shall appear. Mr. Parry, you must know, has put my Ode in motion again, and has brought it at last to a conclusion.
Página 93 - Under an oak whose antique root peeps out Upon the brook that brawls along this wood ; To the which place a poor sequester'd stag, That from the hunter's aim had ta'en a hurt, Did come to languish...
Página 92 - To-day, my lord of Amiens and myself Did steal behind him, as he lay along Under an oak, whose antique root peeps out Upon the brook that brawls along this wood...
Página 56 - IB this station the sea bounds the distance. Nature's compositions are seldom complete or correct; but here nothing seems in the wrong place, and little which one would wish away. The only liberties, necessary to be taken, are a tree or stump, planted at the left, corner, and the uniformity of the long hedge on the right of the fore ground somewhat broken. " About five miles from Llaugharne you pass Green Bridge, by some thought a curiosity, though nothing more than a small stream on the right side...
Página 77 - Wilson, without so great a feature, had a more varied and more proportionate power: he observed nature in all her appearances, and had a characteristic touch for all her forms. But though in effects of dewy freshness and silent evening lights, few...
Página ii - Producing change of beauty ever new. —Ah ! that such beauty, varying in the light Of living nature, cannot be portrayed By words, nor by the pencil's silent skill; But is the property of him alone Who hath beheld it, noted it with care, And in his mind recorded it with love!
Página 77 - Wilson,' says Fuseli, discoursing on art in 1801, ' observed nature in all her appearances, and had a characteristic touch for all her forms. But, though in effects of dewy freshness and silent evening lights few have equalled and fewer excelled him, his grandeur is oftener allied to terror, bustle, and convulsion, than to calmness and tranquillity. He is now numbered with the classics of the art, though little more than the fifth part of a...

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