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OR,
DISCOURSES ON THE IMMORTALITY OF THE SOUL.

BY JEAN PAUL FR. RICHTER.

TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN, BY JULIETTE GOWA.

Second Edition, Revised and Corrected.

Report also, we regret to say, is all that we know of the Campaner Thal, one of Richter's beloved topics, or rather the life of his whole philosophy; glimpses of which look forth on us from almost every one of his writings. He died while engaged, under recent and alnost total blindness, in cnlarging and remodelling this Campaner Thal. The unfinished inanuscript was borne upon his coffin to the burial vault; and Klopstook's hymn, “ Auferstehen wirst du!' 'Thou shalt arise, my soul,' can seldom have been sung with more appropriate application than over the grave of Jean Paul."- Carlyle's Miscellanies.

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PREFACE.

The object of this little volume, is to present the English reader with a picture of the great German author, Jean Paul. To effect this, the writer has interwoven a short biographical sketch, with such selections from his works, as seemed most characteristic of the mind that gave them birth, or eminently conspicuous for their truth and beauty. The life of Richter has already appeared in English, and Carlyle has made the name of Jean Paul familiar in this country, by his masterly critical essays; still, except by name, he is very little known, and his works are far too un-English and peculiar, for them ever as a whole, to become popular among Anglo-Saxon readers. The writer of this sketch has endeavoured, by briefly glancing at the main features in his biography, to connect them with the portions of his works translated. Parenthetical essays, called by Richter “Extra Leaves,” and short aphorisms have been principally selected, as it is in these, it appears to the translator, that the genius of Richter more especially displays itself. In the “ Essay on Charlotte Corday," and in that “On the Death of the Young,” Richter expresses sentiments in which the writer does not conour; but in neither case does he think their fervid eloquence was intended as incense to the Moloch, war, but rather as a tribute to that abnegation of self, which constitutes the basis of all true heroism. In the “ Repeated Promise of Amendment, we have an instance of what very frequently occurs in his writings; a simple narrative is made the groundwork for the most elaborate description, enriched by copious illustration and gorgeous imagery-a

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