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ol. III, No. 25.

Saturday, December 19, 1807.

Price 10d.

. 465

FINANCE.
Receipt to satisfy the Poor; relieve the middle Runks; secure the Property of the
Rich ; surprize and disappoint our Enemies ; make Great Britain happy; and pay
of the national Debt.

COPY OF MR. PITT'S ORIGINAL RECEIPT.
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| wards 1 Here Mr. Pitt's increasing ratio of taxation stopped. But, if such progressively increasing ratio be a good one, why stop there, at 1 - Joth? why not continue it, ad infinifum ? or why not, at least, until the part, paid to government, be equal to the part reserved by the proprietor? But a scale calculated upon an infinitely increasing series would probably be the wisest of all. But here follow two examples of a limited series, Annual | Proportion | Annual Proportion to be, Annual Proportion to be linount. to be paid. Amount.

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I informed congress, at their last session, of the enterprises against the public peace, which were believed to be in preparation by Aaron Curr, and his associates, of the measures taken to defeat them, and to bring the offenders to justice. Their enterprises were happily defeated by the patriotic exertions of the militia, whenever called into action, by the fidelity of the army, and energy of the commander-in-chief, in promptly arranging the difficulties presenting themselves on the Sabine; repairing to meet those arising on the Mississippi, and dissipating, before their explosion, plots engendering there. I shall think it my duty to lay before you the proceedings, and the evidence publicly exhibited on the arraigument of the principal offenders before the district court of Virginia. You will be enabled to judge whether the defect was in the testimony, in the law, or in the administration of the law; and wherever it shall be found, the legislature alone can apply or originate the remedy. The framers of our constitution certainly supposed they had guarded as well their government against destruction by treason, as their citizens against oppression, under pretence of it; and if these ends are not attained, it is of importance to inquire by what means, more effectual, they may be secured.

The accounts of the receipts of revenue, during the year, ending on the 30th day of September last, being not yet made up, a correct statement will be hereafter transmitted from the treasury. In the mean time it is ascertained, that the receipts have amounted to near sixteen millions of dollars; which, with the five millions and a half in the treasury at the beginning of the year, have enabled us, after meeting the current demands and interest incurred, to pay more than four millions of the principal of our funded debt. These payments, with those of the preceding five, and a half years, have extinguished of the funded debt, twenty-five millions and a half of dollars, being the whole which could be paid, or purchased, within the limits of the law, and of our contracts, and have left us in the treasury eight millions and a half of dollars. A portion of this sum may be considered as the commencement of accumulation of the surplusses of revenue, wlrich, after paying the instalments of debt, as they shall become payable, will remain without a specific object. It may partly, indeed, be applied towards completing the defence of the exposed points of our country, on such a scale as shall be adapted to our principles and circumstances..

This object is doubtless among the first entitled to attention in such a state of our finances, and it is one which, whether we have peace or war, will provide security where it is due. Whether what shall remain of this, with the future surplusses, may be usefully applied to purposes already authorised, or more usefully to orbers requiring new authorities, or how otherwise they shall be disposed of, are questions caling for the notice of congress : unless, indeed, they shall be superseded by a change in our public relations, now awaiting the determination of others. Whatever be that determination, it is a great consolation that it will become known, at a. moment wben the supreme council of the nation is assembled at its post, and ready to give the aids of its wisdom and authority to whatever course the good of our country shall then call tis to pursue.

Matters of minor importance will be the subjects of future communications; and nothing shall be wanting, on my part, which may give information or dispatch to the proceedings of the legislature, in the exercise of their high duties, and at a moment so interesting to the public welfare.. Tuesday, Oct. 27, 1807.

TH. JEFFERSON.

TO CORRESPONDENTS. Miles BRITANNICUS shall appear in our next 'nomber.

Clavis Albus's letter respecting a certain general, would, if published in its present form, be detrimental to the interests of the printer Cannot he contrive to re-mould it, so as that it may appear in a safer form?

The conclusion of the article “ Against a Peace,” and the article on a plan of tasation in our next.

Printed and published by G. SIDNEY, No. 1, Northumberland-Street, Strand; Sold by H. T. HODGSON, Wimpole-street ; J. BELL, Sweating's-alley, Cornhill; and by all the Nen's-verders in Town and Country.

ol. III, No. 25.

Saturday, December 19, 1807.

Price 100.

465 . . .

FINANCE.
Receipt to satisfy the Poor ; relieve the middle Ranks; secure the Property of the
Rich; surprize and disappoint our Enemies ; make Great Britain happy ; and pay
off the national Debt.

COPY OF MR. PITT'S ORIGINAL RECEIPT..
s Propor-
✓ Propor-
í Propor-

| Propor-
Annual tion to be Annual \tion to be Annual tion to be Annual tiun to be
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17th
99
134

1695
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26th

16th
104
139

174 SI
1057
70th

1407
24th
1751

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109
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1991

2005
and up-\ 10th

| wards
Here Mr. Pitt's increasing ratio of taxation stopped. But, if such progressively in-
easing ratio be a good one, why stop there, at 1-} Oth? why not continue it, ad infi-
um? or why not, at least, until the part, paid to government, be equal to the part
served by the proprietor?. But a scale calculated upon an infinitely increasing series
ald probably be the wisest of all. But here follow two examples of a limited

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had resolved to resist us, an army of 20,000 men was conjured up immediately to attack our troops, who were of necessity obliged to yield. Sir Home Popham, when he could bring himself to write upon this subject, wrote a crying sort of a letter to the admiralty, complaining of the unexampled perfidy and atrocity of the Spaniards. If this perfidy and atrocity were to be enquired into, how would they appear ? As soon as the Spaniards were perfectly convinced that we did not come there for their benefit, or for any honourable purpose, but merely for booty and plunder, from that moment they determined to resist us. When they had seen above a million of dollars put on board our ships, and sent off to Europe-when they saw near three millions-worth of quicksilver likely to be carried off also; it was time for them to oppose this system of plunder. Without calling it perfidy or atrocity, they did what any other men pos. sessing spirit, and conscious of their strength, would have done on a similar occasion, It was wonderful how certain persons accommodated themselves to all manner of events. When Buenos Ayres was taken, they expatiated on the great advantages of it; but when it was lost, they appeared to think the loss was trifling. It was in the same way that they cried out for the deliverance of Europe, and said, that no expence of blood and treasure was too great to secure our continental connexions; but as soon 'as the continent was lost, they found that we could do very well without it; and now that our commerce appears to be in the greatest đanger, they are beginning to find out that we can do without commerce also. The fact was, that the district of Buenos Ayres produced no other articles of commerce, except hides and tallow. There bad been some personalities introduced into this discussion, but that fault was not his. As he had been charged with bringing forward the question on party motives, he must so far retaliate as to say that he never received or solicited any thing from the late administration, whereas the worthy alderman (Alderman Birch) had applied to Lord Erskine for a living for his son. If he had any private interest in this decision, he declared that it was rather in favour of Sir Home Popham than against him ; but he conceived that the thanks of the city would be of no value in future, if a person could have the thanks of the city of London for such conduct as that of Sir Home Popham's

Mr. Kemble deprecated all party contests at such a moment as the present, when every heart and hand should be united in defence of the country. · The resolution was then put, and negatived by a very great show of hands, and a division being called for, there appearedFor the resolution......2 aldermen .

5 commoners. Otellers

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STATE PAPERS. From the London Gazette of Salurday, Nov. 28, fcontinued from p.432.) or shall arrive at any port in this kingdom, destined to some port or place within the restriction of the said order, and proof shall be made to the satisfaction of the court admiralty in which such vessel shall be proceeded against, in case the same shall be brought in as prize, that the loading of the said vessel had commenced before the said periods, and before information of the said order had actually been received at the port of shipment, the said vessel, together with the goods so laden, shall be restored to the owner or owners thereof, and shall be permitted to proceed on hes voyage in such njanner, as if such vessel had sailed before the day so specified as afore

said: And it is further ordered; that no proof shall be admitted, or be gone into, for the purpose of shewing that information of the said order, of the 11th of Novemper instant, had not been received at the said places respectively, at the several periods before assigned.

. W. FAWKENER. Al the Court at the Queen's Palace, the 25th of November, 1807; present,

the King's Most Excellent Majesty in Council. Whereas his majesty, by his order in council, dated the 11th of November instant, respecting the trade to be carried on with his inajesty's enemies, was pleased to exempt from the restrictions of the saill order, all vessels which shall have cleared out from any port or place in this kingdom, under such regulations as biś majesty may think fit to prescribe, and shall be proceeding direct to the ports spécified in the respective clearances; his majesty, taking into consideration the expediency of making such regulations, is pleased, by and with the advice of his privy council, to order, and it is hereby ordered, that all vessels belonging to countries not at war with his majesty, shall be permitted to lade, in any port of the United Kingdonı, any goods being the produce or manufacture of his majesty's dominions, or East India goods, or prize goods, (all such goods having been lawfully imported) and to clear out with, and freely to convey the same lo any port or place in any colony in the West Indies, or America, bulonging to his mijesty's enemies, such port or place not being in a state of actual blockade, subject to the payment of such duties as may at the time, when any such vessels may be cleared out, be due by law on the exportation of any

such goods, or in respect of the same being destined to the ports of the colonies - belonging to his majesty's enemies; and likewise to lace, clear out with, and convey,

as aforesaid, any articles of foreign produce or nianufacture which shall have been lawfully imported into this kingdom, provided his majesty's licence shald have been previously obtained for so conveying such foreign produce or manufacture: And it is further ordered, that any vessel belonging as aforesaid shall be permitted to lade in any port of the United Kingdom any goods, not being naval or military stores, which shall be of the growth, produce or manufacture of this kingdom, or which shall have been lawfully imported, (save and except foreign sugar, coffee, wine, brandy, snuff, and cotton,) and to clear out with, and freely to convey the same to any port, to be specfied in the clearance, not being in a state of actual blockade, although the same shall be under the restrictions of the said order ; and likewise to lace, clear out, and convey foreign sugar, coffee, wine, brandy, snuff, and cotton, which shall have been lawfully iinported, provided his majesty's licence shall bave been preriously obtained for the exportation and conveyance thereof: And it is liereby further ordered, that no vessel shall be permitted to clear out from any port or place of this kingdom to any port or place of any country subjected to the restrictions of the said order, with any goods which shall have been laden (after notice of the suid order) on board the vessel which shall have imported the same into this kingdom, without having first duly entered and landed the same in some port or place in this kingdom; and that no vessel shall be permitted to clear out from any port or place in this kingdom to any port or place whatever, with any goods the produce or manufacture of any country subjected to the restrictions of the said order, which shall bave beeu laden, after notice as aforesaid, on board the vessel importing the same, without having so duly entered and landed the same; or any goods whatever which shall have been Jaden after such notice in the vessel importing the same, in any port or place of any country subjected to the restrictions of the said order, without having so luly entered and landed the same in some port or place in this kingdom, except the caigo shall consist wholly of flour, meal, grain, or any article or articles the produce of the soil of some country which is not subjected to the restrictions of the said order, except cotton, and which shall have been imported in an unmanufactured state direct from such country into this kingdom, in a vessel belonging to the country from which such goods have been brought, and in which the same were grown and produced: And it is further ordered, that any vessel belonging to any country not at war with his mer jesty, may clear out from Guernsey, Jersey, or Man, to any port or place, under the restrictions of the said order, which shall be specified in the clearance, not being

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