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A.

ABERRANT groups, ii.227.
Abyssinia, plants of, ii. 167.
Acclimatisation, i. 173.
Adoxa, i. 270.
Affinities of extinct species, ii. 106.
— of organic beings, ii.225.
Agassiz, on Amblyopsis, i. 173.
—, on groups of species suddenly
appearing, ii. 88.
— on prophetic forms, ii. 107.
—, on embryological succession,
ii. 120.
—, on the Glacial period, ii. 151.
—, on embryological characters,
ii. 210.
—, on the latest tertiary forms, ii.

—, on parallelism of embryologi-
cal development and geological
succession, ii. 254.
—, Alex, on pedicellariae, i. 298.
Algae of New Zealand, ii. 164.
Alligators, males, fighting, i. 108.
Alternate generations, ii. 239,
Amblyopsis, blind fish, i. 173.
America, North, productions allied
to those of Europe, ii. 156.
— —, boulders and glaciers of,
ii. 159.
—, South, no modern formations
on west coast, ii. 61.
Ammonites, sudden extinction of
ii. 99.
A. sterility of, ii. 4.
Analogy of variations, i. 197.
Ancylus, ii. 174.
Andaman Islands inhabited by a
toad, ii. 182.
Animals, not domesticated from
being variable, i. 19.
—, domestic, descended from seve-
ral stocks, i. 21.
—, -, acclimatisation of, i. 175.
— of Australia, i. 140.
— with thicker fur in cold cli-
mates, i. 166.
—, blind, in caves, i. 172.
—, extinct, of Australia, ii. 121.
Anomma, i. 361.

Antarctic islands, ancient flora of,
ii. 190.
Antechinus, ii. 219.
Ants attending aphides, i. 323.
—, slave-making instinct, i. 386.
—, neuters, structure of, i. 359.
Apes, not having acquired intel-
ectual powers, i. 282.
Aphides, attended by ants, i. 323.
Aphis, development of, ii. 245.
Apteryx, i. 218.
Arab horses, i. 40.
Aralo-Caspian Sea, ii. 121.
Archeopteryx, ii. 80.
Archiac, M. de, on the succession of
species, ii. 103.
Artichoke, Jerusalem, i. 176.
Ascension, plants of, ii. 178.
Asclepias, pollen of, i. 236.
Asparagus, ii. 143.
Aspicarpa, ii. 209.
Asses, striped, i. 198.
—, improved by selection, i. 48.
Ateuchus, i. 168.
Aucapitaine, on land-shells, ii., 187.
Audubon, on habits of frigate-bird,
i. 222.
—, on variation in birds' nests, i.
324

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Bizcacha, ii. 133.
—, affinities of, ii. 227.
Bladder for swimming, in fish, i. 230.
Blindness of cave animals, i. 170.
Blyth, Mr., on distinctness of Indian
cattle, i. 21.
—, on striped hemionus, i. 199.
—, on crossed geese, ii. 10.
Box. Mr., on the Spanish pointer,

i. 40.
Bory St. Vincent, on Batrachians,
ii. 182.
Bosquet, M., on fossil Chthamalus,
ii. 80

Boulders, erratic, on the Azores, ii.
149.
Branchiae, i. 231, 232.
— of crustaceans, i. 238.
Braun, Prof., on the seeds of Fuma-
riaceae, i. 271.
Brent, Mr., on house-tumblers, i.
326.
Britain, mammals of, ii. 185.
Broca, Prof., on Natural Selection,
i. 265.
Bronn, Prof., on duration of specific
forms, ii. 66.
—, various objections by, i. 265.
Brown, Robert, on classification, ii.
207. -
—, Séquard, on inherited muti-
lations, i. 168.
Busk, Mr., on the Polyzoa, i. 301.
Butterflies, mimetic, ii. 222, 223,
224. -
Buzarcingues, on sterility of varie-
ties, ii. 38.

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Baleen, i. 285.
Barberry, flowers of, i. 121.
Barrande, M., on Silurian colonies,
ii. 90.
—, on the succession of species,
ii. 103.
—, on parallelism of palaeozoic
formations, ii. 106.
—, on affinities of ancient species,
ii. 108.
Barriers, importance of, ii. 130.
Bates, Mr., on mimetic butterflies,
ii. 222, 223, 224.
Batrachians on islands, ii. 182.
Bats, how structure acquired, i.
218.
—, distribution of, ii. 184.
Bear, catching water-insects, i. 220.
Beauty, how acquired, i. 249; ii.
283.
Bee, sting of, i.255.
—, queen, killing rivals, i. 256.
—, Australian, extermination of,

i. 93.
Bees fertilising flowers, i. 90.
—, hive, not sucking the red
clover, i. 117.
—, Ligurian, i. 117.
—, hive, ceil-making instinct, i.
42.
—, variation in habits, i. 324.
—, parasitic, i. 336.
—, humble, cells of, i. 343.
Beetles, wingless, in Madeira, i. 169.
— with deficient tarsi, i. 168.
Bentham, Mr., on British plants, i.
58.
—, on classification, ii. 211.
Berkeley, Mr., on seeds in salt
water, ii. 142.
Bermuda, birds of, ii. 180.
Birds acquiring fear, i. 325.
—, beauty of, i. 252.
— annually cross the Atlantic, ii.

—, colour of, on continents, i.
165.

—, footsteps and remains of, in
secondary rocks, ii. 79.

—, fossil, in caves of Brazil, ii.

—, of Madeira, Bermuda, and
Galapagos, ii. 179, 180.
—, song of males, i. 109.
— transporting seeds, ii. 148.
—, waders, ii. 175.
—-, wingless, i. 167, 218.

Cabbage, varieties of crossed, i, 122.
Calceolaria, ii. 7, 8.
Canary-birds, sterility of hybrids,

ii. 9.
Cape de Verde islands, productions

of, ii. 189.
—, plants of, on mountains, ii.

Cape of Good Hope, plants of, i.
158; ii. 178.

Carpenter, Dr., on foraminifera, ii.
117.

Carthamus, i. 271.

Catasetum, i. 243; ii. 216.

Cats, with blue eyes, deaf, i. 13.

, variation in habits of, i. 325.

— curling tail when going to
spring, i. 254.

Cattle destroying fir-trees, i. 88.
— destroyed by flies in Paraguay,

i. 89.
—, breeds of locally extinct, i. 134.
—, fertility of Indian and Euro-
pean breeds, ii. 10.
—, Indian, i. 21; ii.10.
Cave, inhabitants of, blind, i. 170.
Čecidomyia, ii. 239.
Celts, proving antiquity of man,
i. 21.
Centres of Creation, ii. 135.
Cephalopoda, structures of eyes, i.
236.
—, development of, ii. 244.
Cercopithecus, tail of, i. 294.
Ceroxylus laceratus, i. 284.
Cervulus, ii. 9.
Cetacea, teeth and hair, 1. 179.
—, development of the whale-
bone, i. 285.
Cetaceans, i. 285.
Ceylon, plants of, ii. 164.
Chalk formation, ii. 100.
Characters, divergence of, i. 134.
—, sexual, variable, i. 185, 191.
—, adaptive or analogical, ii. 218.
Charlock, i. 94.
Checks, to increase, i. 83.
—, mutual, i. 86.
Chelae of Crustaceans, i. 300.
Chickens, instinctive tameness of,
i. 329. -
Chironomus, its asexual reproduc-
tion, ii. 240.
Chthamalinae, ii. 59.
Chthamalus, cretacean species of,
ii. 81.
Circumstances favourable to selec-
tion of domestic F. i. 46.
— — to natural selection, i. 124.
Cirripedes capable of crossing, i. 124.
—, carapace aborted, i. 184.
—, their ovigerous frena, i. 232.
—, fossil, ii. 80.
—, larvae of, ii. 243.
Claparède, Prof., on the hair-clasp-
ers of the Acaridae, i. 239.
Clarke, Rev. W. B., on old glaciers
in Australia, ii. 159.
Classification, ii. 202.
Clift, Mr., on the succession of types,
ii. 121.
Climate, effects of, in checking in-
crease of beings, i. 84.
—, adaptation of, to organisms, i.

Climbing plants, i. 230.
—, development of, i. 305.
Clover visited by bees, i. 117.
Cobites, intestine of, i. 229.
Cockroach, i. 93.
Collections, palaeontological, poor,
ii. 58.
Colour, influenced by climate, i. 165.
—, in relation to attack by flies,
i. 248.
Columba livia, parent of domestic
pigeons, i. 26.
Colymbetes, ii. 174.
Compensation of growth, i. 182.
coole, flowers and seeds of, i.
9.
—, outer and inner florets of, i.
270 -

—, male flowers of, ii. 257.
Conclusion, general, ii. 293.
Conditions, slight changes in, fa-
vourable to fertility, ii. 27.
Convergence of genera, i. 156.
Coot. i. 222.
Cope, Prof., on the acceleration or
retardation of the period of repro-
duction, i. 232.
Coral-islands, seeds drifted to, ii.
145.
— reefs, indicating movements of
earth, ii. 145.
Corn-crake, i. 223.
Correlated variation in domestie
productions, i. 13.
Coryanthes, i. 241.
Creation, single centres of, ii. 135.
Crinum, ii. 6.
Croll, Mr., on subaerial denudation,
ii. 53, 56.
—, on the age of our oldest for-
mations, ii. 83.
—, on alternate Glacial periods
in the North and South, ii. 160.
Crosses, reciprocal, ii. 14.
Crossing of domestic animals, im-
portance in altering breeds, i. 23.
—, advantages of, i. 119, 120.
TTg, unfavourable to selection, i.
12

Crüger, Dr., on Coryanthes, i. 241.
Crustacea of New Zealand, ii. 164.
Crustacean, blind, i. 171.
air-breathers, i. 238.
Crustaceans, their chelae, i. 300.
Cryptocerus, i. 359. -
Ctenomys, blind, i. 170.
Cuckoo, instinct of, i. 319, 330,

Cunningham, Mr., on the flight of
the logger-headed duck, i. 167.
Currants, grafts of, ii. 19.
Currents of sea, rate of, ii. 144.
Cuvier, on conditions of existence,
i. 320.
Cuvier, on fossil monkeys, ii. 79.
—, Fred., on instinct, i. 320.
Cyclostoma, resisting salt water, ii.
187.

D.

Dana, Prof., on blind cave-animals,
i. 172.
—, on relations of crustaceans of
Japan, ii. 158.
—, on crustaceans of New Zea-
land, ii. 164.
Dawson, Dr., on eozoon, ii. 85.
De Candolle, Aug. Pyr., on struggle
for existence, i. 77.
—, on umbelliferoe, i. 181.
—, on general affinities, ii.228.
—, Alph., on the variability of
oaks, i. 62.
—, on low plants, widely dis-
persed, ii.,196.
—, on widely-ranging plants be-
ing variable, i. 67,
—, on naturalisation, i. 139.
—, on winged seeds, i. 181.
—, on Alpine species suddenly
becoming rare, i. 210.
—, on distribution of plants with
large seeds, ii.145.
—, on vegetation of Australia, ii.
167.
—, on fresh-water plants, ii. 174.
—, on insular plants. ii. 178.
Degradation of rocks, ii. 52.
Denudation, rate of, ii. 54.
— of oldest rocks, ii. 85.
— of granitic areas, ii. 64.
Development of ancient forms, ii.
116.
Devonian system, ii. 113.
Dianthus, fertility of crosses, ii. 13.
Dimorphism in plants, i. 55; ii. 29.
Dirt on feet of birds, ii. 148.
Dispersal, means of, ii. 140.
— during Glacial period, ii. 151.
Distribution, goal. ii. 129.
—, means of, ii. 140.
Disuse, effect of, under nature, i.

Divergence of character, i. 134.

Diversification of means for same
general purpose, i. 240.
Division, physiological, of labour,
i. 139. -
Dog, resemblance of jaw to that of
ğ. Thylacinus, ii. 220.
Dogs, hairless, with imperfect teeth,
i. 14.
— descended from several wild
stocks, i. 22.
—, domestic instincts of, i. 327.
—, inherited civilisation of, i. 327.
—, fertility of breeds together, ii.
10.

—, - of crosses, ii. 35.
—, proportions of body in differ-
ent breeds, when young, ii. 247.
Domestication, variation under, i. 7.
Double flowers, i. 358.
Downing, Mr., on fruit-trees in
America, i. 104.
Dragon flies, intestines of, i. 229.
Drift-timber, ii. 145.
Driver-ant, i. 361.
Drones killed by other bees, i. 256.
Duck, domestic, wings of, reduced,
i. 12.
, beak of i. 285.
—, logger-headed, i. 218.
Duckweed, ii. 173.
Bo: affinities of, ii. 206.
Dung-beetles with deficient tarsi, i.
168.
Dytiscus, ii. 174.

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Eggs, young birds escaping from, i.
106.

Egypt, productions of, not modified,
i. 263.

Electric organs, i. 234.
Elephant, rate of increase, i. 80.
—, of Glacial period, i. 176.
Embryology, ii. 239.
Eozoon Canadense, ii. 84.
Epilepsy inherited, i. 167.
Existence, struggle for, i. 75.
—, condition of, i. 261. -
Extinction, as bearing on natural
selection, i. 150.
— of domestic varieties, i. 145.
—, ii. 94.
Eye, structure of, i. 225.
—, correction for aberration, i. 255.
Eyes, reduction in moles, i. 170.

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Fabre, M., on hymenoptera fight-
ing, i. 108.
—, on parasitic sphex, i. 336.
—, on Sitaris, ii. 252.
Falconer, Dr., on naturalisation of
plants in India, i. 80.
—, on elephants and mastodons,
ii. 113.
— and Cautley, on mammals of
sub-Himalayan beds, ii. 122.
Falkland Islands, wolf of, ii. 183.
Faults, ii. 54.
Faunas, marine, ii. 131.
Fear, instinctive, in birds, i. 329.
Feet of birds, young molluscs ad-
hering to, ii. 174.
Fertilisation variously effected, i.
241, 252.
Fertility of hybrids, ii. 6.
—, from slight changes in condi-
tions, ii. 28.
— of crossed varieties, ii. 34.
Fir-trees destroyed by cattle, i. 88.
—, pollen of, i. 257.
Fish, flying, i. 218.
—, teleostean, sudden appearance
of, ii. 81.
—, eating seeds, ii. 146,175.
—, fresh-water, distribution of,
ii. 172.

Fishes, ganoid, now confined to

[blocks in formation]

fresh water, i. 130.
—, electric organs of, i. 234.
—, ganoid, living in fresh water,
ii. 99.

man, 1. 21.
Flower, Prof., on the Larynx, i. 297.
—, on Halitherium, ii. 108.
—, on the resemblance between
the jaws of the dog and Thyla-
cinus, ii. 220.
—, on the homology of the feet of
certain marsupials, ii. 232.
Flowers, structure of. in relation to
crossing, i. 114.
—, of compositae and umbelli-
ferae, i. 179, 270.
, beauty of, i. 252.
—, double, i. 358.
Flysch formation, destitute of or-
ganic remains, ii. 59.
Forbes, Mr. D., on glacial action in
the Andes, ii. 160.
—, E., on colours of shells, i. 165.
—, on abrupt range of shells in
depth, i. 210.
—, on poorness of palaeontological
collections, ii. 58.
—, on continuous succession of
genera, ii. 93.
—, on continental extensions, ii.
140, 141.
—, on distribution during Glacial
period, ii. 152.
—, on parallelism in time and
space, ii. 200.
Forests, changes in, in America, i.
91.
Formation, Devonian, ii. 113.
—, Cambrian, ii. 84.
Formations, thickness of, in Britain,
ii. 55.
—, intermittent, ii. 69.
Formica, rufescens, i. 336.
—, sanguinea, i. 338.
—, flava, neuter of, i. 360.
Forms, lowly organised, long en-
during, i. 154.
Frena, ovigerous, of cirripedes, i.

Fresh-water productions, dispersal
of, ii. 171.

Fries, on species in large genera
being closely allied to other spe-
cies, i. 71.

Frigate-bird, i. 222.

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