Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

1844. Report from the Committee on Post-Offices and Post-Roads on the subject of the reduction of the rates of postage. February 22, 1844. 11 pp. 8°. 28th Congress, 1st session. Senate document No. 137. 433 1845. Report of the Postmaster-General communicating information illustrative of the operation of the British post-office system and the effect upon its revenues of the reduced rates of postage. January 16, 1845. 43 pp. 8°. 28th Congress, 2d session. Senate report No. 43. 450 1848. Postage and post routes. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and Post-Roads in regard to a reduction of postage on letters and newspapers, etc. June 23, 1848. 97 pp. 8°. 30th Congress, 1st session. House report No. 731. 526 1848. Reduced postage. Letter from the Postmaster-General transmitting a communication from the First Assistant Postmaster-General in regard to a system of reduced tages, etc. December 22, 1848. 29 pp. 8°. 30th Congress, 2d session. House executive document No. 17. 540 1850. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and Post-Roads, to whom was referred “a bill to reduce the rates of postage.” June 3, 1850. 11 pp. 8°. 31st Congress, 1st session. Senate report No. 148. 565 1850. Reduction of rates of postage. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and Post-Roads. July 24, 1850. 8 pp. 8°. 31st Congress, 1st session. House report No. 411. - 585 1852. Rates of postage. Report from the Committee on Post-Offices and Post-Roads in relation to the postage on *...*. periodicals, and other printed matter. January 29, 1852. 3 pp. 8°. 3 ongress, 1st session. House report No. 49.

656 1857. Communication from Pliny Miles, of New York, in favor of a reform of the postal system, accompanied by a bill. February 23, 1857. 7 pp. 8°. 34th Congress, 3d session. Senate miscellaneous document No. 50. 890 1881. Postage on second-class matter at certain offices. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and Post-Roads. January 8, 1881. 1 page. 8°. 46th Congress, 3d session. House report No. 48. 1982 1882. Weight, cost of carriage, and postage on second-class mail matter. Letter from the Postmaster-General in response to a resolution of the House of Representatives, giving the weight, cost of carriage, and postage collected on second-class mail matter for the year ended June 30, 1881. May 23, 1882. 4 pp. 8°. 47th Congress, 1st session. House executive document No. 206. 2031 1882. Postage on second-class mail matter at letter-carrier offices. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and Post-Roads. January 30, 1882. 1 page. 8°. 47th Congress, 1st session. House report No. 126. 2065 1884. Mail matter of the second class. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and Post-Roads. January 23, 1884. 4 pp. 8°. 48th Congress, 1st session. House report No. 101. Report on “the his fixing the rate to be paid upon mail matter of the second class thereof, when sent by persons other than the publishers or news agent.” 2253 1884. Postage on second-class mail matter at letter-carrier offices. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and Post-Roads. January 30, 1884. 1 page. 8°. 48th Congress, 1st session. House report No. 125. 2253 1884. Publications at second-class rates. Report from the Committee on the PostOffice and Post-Roads. May 12, 1884. 2 pp. 8°. 48th Congress, 1st session. House report No. 1546. Report on “the bill (H.R. 6739) to permit the publishers of newspapers to send marked copies of their publications at second-class rates.”

2258 1885. Postage on second-class mailable matter. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and the Post-Roads. February 4, 1885. 2 pp. 8°. 48th Congress, 2d session. House report No. 2498. 2328 1888. Second-class mail matter. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and Post-Roads. January 31, 1888. 2 pp. 8°. 50th Congress, 1st session. House "p. No. 177. 2598 1890. Report from the Committee on Post-Offices and Post-Roads on the bill (S. 698) extending the privilege of the mail free of postage to historical societies. February 17, 1890. 2 pp. 8°. 51st Congress, 1st session. Senate report No. 294. 2703 1890. Postage on periodical publications. Report from the Committee on the PostOffice and Post-Roads. April 7, 1890. 4 pp. 8°. 51st Congress, 1st session. House report No. 1308. 2811 1890. Second-class mail matter. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and Fol. May 17, 1890. 3 pp. 8°. 51st Congress, 1st session. House report No. 2027. 2812

[ocr errors]

1890. Return of second-class mail matter. Report from the l'ommittee on the Post

Office and Post-Roads. December 16, 1890.3 pp. 8°. 51st Congress, Ist session. House report No. 3307.

2885 1892. Postage on semiweekly and triweekly publications. Report from the Committee

on the Post-Office and Post-Roads. July 19, 1892. 2 pp. 8o. 52d Congress, Ist session. House report No. 1951.

3048 1894. Rate of postage on certain periodicals. Report from the Committee on the Post

Office and Post-Roads. March 1, 1894. 5 pp. 8o. 53d Congress, 2d session. House report No. 513.

3270 1896. Report from the (ommittee on Post-Offices and Post-Roads. April 17, 1896.

1 page. 8° 54th Congress, 1st session. Senate report No. 729. Recommending that bulletins of State boards of agriculture be admitted to the mails as secondclass matter.

3360 1896. Second-class mail matter. Report from the ('ommittee on the Post-Office and

Post-Roads. February 5, 1896. 31 pp. 89 54th Congress, 1st session. House report No. 260. Reprinted in Senate report No. 1517, Š4th Congress, 2d session, pp. 181-211.

3457 1896. Letter from the Postmaster-General, in response to Senate resolution dated June

6, 1896, calling for information and copies of papers relating to certain rulings of the Department made during the six months preceding the passage of said resislution, having reference to second-class mail matter. December 17, 1896. 6 pp. 8o. 54th ('ongress, 2d session. Senate document No. 22.

3467 1896. Postal laws. Report from the Committee on Rules. December 19, 1896. 1 page. 8°. 54th Congress, 2d session. House report No. 2359.

3554 1897. The Loud bill. Report from the Committee on Post-Offices and Post-Roads.

February 22, 1897. iii, 211, 10 pp. 80. 54th Congress, 2d session. Senate report No. 1517, part 1-2. Text of the bill, pp. ii-iii; Notes of Hearings (Jan., 1897] before the Committee on Post-Offices and Post-Roads of the Senate of the United States on the subject of H. R. 4566, to amend the postal laws relating to second-class mail matter, and commonly known as the Loud bill, pp. 1-179; Reprint of House report No. 260, 54th Congress, 1st session, pp. 181-211; Views of the minority, part 2, pp. 1-10.

3476 1898. Second-class mail matter. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and

Post-Roads. January 5, 1898. 34 pp. 8o. 55th Congress, 2d session. House report No. 73.

3717 1899. Second-class mail matter. Report from the committee on the Post-Office and

Post-Roads. January 4, 1899. 23 pp. 8° 55th Congress, 3d session. House report No. 1715. Pp: 2–23 contain a reprint of House report No. 73, 55th Congress, 2d session.

3840 1900. Certain publications as second-class mail matter. Report from the Committee

on Post-Offices and Post-Roads. May 25, 1900. 2 pp. 89. 56th Congress, Ist session. Senate report No. 1499.

3895 1900. Second-class matter. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and Post

Roads. February 19, 1900. 23 pp. 8o. 56th Congress, 1st session. House report No. 376.

4022 1900. Second-class mail matter. Report from the Committee on the Post-Office and

Post-Roads. April 7, 1900. 2 pp. 8o. 56th Congress, 1st session. House report No.951.

4024 1900. Certain publications as second-class mail matter. Report from the Committee

on the Post-Office and Post-Roads. May 10, 1900. 2 pp. 8o. 56th Congress, Ist session. House report No. 1431.

4026 1900. Refund of excessive postage on certain periodicals. Report from the com

mittee on Claims. May 23, 1900.9 pp. 80? 56th Congress, 1st session. House report No. 1698.

4026 1901. Report [and testimony] of the joint commission to investigate the postal service.

Washington: Government Printing Office, 1901. 3 vols. Plates. Maps. Diagrams. 8°. 56th Congress, 2d session. Senate document no. 89. The report, without testimony, is printed as House report No. 2284, 56th Congress, 2d session.

4036-4038, 4212 1902. Letter from the Postmaster-General, in response to the resolution of the Senate

calling for information as to the construction placed by the Post-Office Department upon the existing law prescribing the postage for periodical publications like those published by churches, etc. February 28, 1902. 4 pp. 8o. 57th Congress, 1st session. Senate document No. 222.

4234 1903. Postal rates on periodicals. Letter from the Postmaster-General submitting an

estimate of the effect on the revenue of the Post-Office Department in case of the adoption of the amendment giving all periodicals the same rate and terms as

that now given weekly periodicals. March 2, 1903. 2 pp. 8o. 57th Congress, 2d session. Senate document No. 208.

4430 1905. Punishing certain cases of fraud upon the postal service. Report from the

Committee on the Post-Office and Post-Roads. February 23, 1905. 2 pp. 8o. 58th Congress, 3d session. House report No. 4836.

4762 1906. Postage for college publications, etc. Letter from the Postmaster-General

transmitting response to Senate resolution of December 15, 1905. 3 pp. 8o.

59th Congress, 1st session. Senate document No. 152. 1906. Letter from the Postmaster-General, transmitting an answer to the inquiry of

the House as to the status of “The Union News," of Thomaston, Ga., with reference to the use of the mails. March 24, 1906. 3 pp. 8o. 59th Congress, Ist

session. House document No. 650. 1906. Second-class mail matter. Letter of the Postmaster-General to the chairman of

the Committee on Post-Offices and Post-Roads, United States Senate, relative to the appointment of a commission to investigate, consider, and report findings and recommendations regarding second-class mail matter. May 5, 1906. 3 pp. 8o.

III. ARTICLES IN PERIODICALS.

1817. Newspaper Postage. Niles' Weekly Register, vol. 13 (Oct. 25, 1817): 129–130.

Advocates the abolition of postage rates on newspapers. 1841. Report of George Plitt, special agent of the Post-Office Department, Feb. 3, 1841.

New York Review, vol. 9 (July, 1841): 70–91. Recommendation that postage

on newspapers be charged by weight, page 87. 1843. The Post-Office Department. Hunt's Merchants' Magazine, vol. 9 (Nov., 1843):

436-444. “Postage on newspapers and magazines," pp. 438, 441-442. 1844. Post-Office Reform and Uniform Postages, James M. Whiton. Hunt's Mer

chants' Magazine, vol. 10 (Jan., 1844): 27-38. 1845. Post-Office Reform. American Review, vol. 1 (Feb., 1845): 199–214. “News

papers and periodicals,''page 210. 1845. The New Postage Law and its Advantages. Hunt's Merchants' Magazine, vol.

13 (July, 1845): 72–81. “Rates of postage on periodicals," page 75. 1847. The Post System. J. S. Duke. De Bow's Review, vol. 3 (Feb., 1847): 149–160;

vol. 5 (Feb., 1848): 152–163. Free newspapers, vol. 3, page 160. 1848. Post-Office Reform. Joshua Leavitt. New Englander, vol. 6 (Jan., 1848):

111-120. “Newspaper postage,” page 120. 1848. Our Post-Office. Joshua Leavitt. New Englander, vol. 6 (July, 1848): 393–404.

“Newspaper postage,”' pp. 396, 397, 398, 399. 1848. The Post-Office. United States Magazine and Democratic Review, vol. 22,

(Jan., 1848): 18–26. “Newspaper postage,” page 24. 1851. Postal Reform-Cheap Postage. Harper's New Monthly Magazine, vol. 3

(November, 1851): 837-839. "Tax on newspapers,” page 838. 1862. Our Postal System. Its Advantages, Requirements, and Shortcomings. Pliny

Miles. Bankers' Magazine (New York), vol. 16 (Feb., 1862): 577-588. 1875. Our Post-Office. Gardiner G. Hubbard. Atlantic Monthly, vol. 35 (Jan.,

1875): 87–104. “Burden of newspapers to the mails," page 95. 1897. The Postal Deficit and the Loud Bill. James L. Cowles. The Outlook, vol. 55

(Feb., 13, 1897): 500-503. "The postal deficit is not due to the cent-a-pound rate paid to the Government for postage on paper-covered books and on returned newspapers, but to the eight cents a pound tax levied by railway managers for a service

that would yield them a handsome profit at one-half a cent a pound.” 1897. A Step Toward Economy in the Postal Service. E. F. Loud. Forum, vol. 24

(December, 1897): 471-475. “Exclusion of books issued in form of serial libraries, etc., and exclusion of sample copy privilege from second-class matter would

save the Government $13,000,000 a year.' 1898. Side Lights on Postal Reform. Orville J. Victor. Forum, vol. 24 (Feb., 1898):

723-728. "Increase in second-class matter not due to so-called 'libraries,' but to the advancing circulation of periodical publications. "To prohibit it the the freest use of the mails in its distribution over our vast domain is simply a

crime against civilization.” 1898. The Need of Postal Reform. E. F. Loud. North American Review, vol. 166

(March, 1898): 342–349. Discussion of the bill restricting the privileges of second

class matter, with consideration of different sections, in advocacy of the measure. 1899. Editorial cheap library post]. Education, vol. 20 (November, 1899): 177-178.

An argument for the reduction of book postage in order to extend library privileges. 1900. Revival of the Second-Class Mail Matter Question. Scientific American, n. s.,

vol. 82 (Feb. 24, 1900): 114. Approves the prohibition as second-class matter of books which are purposed to be periodical publications and opposes the zone

system of charges. 1900. Postal Reform. Public Opinion, vol. 28 (Apr. 5, 1900): 423. “The over

whelming defeat of the bill for reformation of the postal service furnished additional evidence of the incapacity of the Government to conduct its business on business principles.”—Nation. "No better evidence can be shown of the general desire for postal reforms than the number of bills now before ('ongress seeking

changes in the present postal regulations."-Boston Transcript, 1901. The work of the Postal Commission. William H. Moody. Independent, vol. 53

(Jan. 24, 1901): 195–198. “The deficit in the postal administration is unquestionably due to the great losses which are incurred in the transmission of second

class matter." 1901. The Work of the Postal ('ommission. Public Opinion, vol. 30 (Jan. 31, 1901):

133–134. Outlines Mr. Moody's article in the Independent of January 24, 1901. 1901. Bureaucracy in America. Editorial.] The Arena, vol. 26 (Dec., 1901): 659–

661. Takes exception to the rulings of the Post-Office Department regarding

second-class matter. 1901. Publishers and the Postal Department. C. H. Howard. Arena, vol. 26 (Dec.,

1901): 570-577. Discusses the circular of the Third Assistant Postmaster-General of April 13, 1901, the subsequent action of publishers of periodicals, the rulings

of July 17, 1901, and holds that second-class matter does not cause the postal deficit. 1901. Postal Changes, Good and Bad. Outlook, vol. 69 (Dec. 28, 1901): 1053–1054.

Discusses the case of the periodical publication Appeal to Reason,” and questions the authority of the Third Assistant Postmaster-General in rulings restricting

the second-class mailing privilege. 1902. The Postal Service. Scientific American Supplement, vol. 53 (Jan. 11, 1902):

21769–21770. Review of the Report of the Postmaster-General for 1901 9 ntains

a review of abuses in second-class matter. 1902. Defects and Abuses in Our Postal System. Henry A. Castle. North American

Review, vol. 174 (June, 1902): 807-819; vol. 175 (July, 1902): 115–127. “It is argued that the saving on second-class matter to be effected by reforms recently inaugurated will compensate for the loss of revenue by reason of reduced letter postage. But that saving is still in abeyence, and is a purely speculative benefit to be realized,

if at all, in the distant future. 1902. The Post-Office System. J. W. Sullivan. American Federationist, vol. 9

(Aug., 1902): 415-421; (Oct., 1902): 693–697. Abuse of second-class privileges, 1902. Å “Reform" Without a Principle. Outlook, vol. 72 (Nov. 29, 1902): 719. Edi

torial on the report of the Third Assistant Postmaster-General, which concludes: “For our part, we can see no reason for more than three classes of mail matter:(1) Written matter-letters and postal cards. (2) Printed matter of every sort. (3) Merchandise. If the equalizing of rates upon printed matter requires that the rate charged to newspapers shall be increased or the rates to rail roads shall be diminished, or both, then by all means let these changes be made. But let

us have a system which is based upon some principle of justice.” 1903. The Post-Office and the People. M. G. Cunniff. World's Work, vol. 7 (Nov.,

1903): 4074 4085; (Dec., 1903): 4245–4254 (March, 1904): 4085, 4589-4594. “In brief, the classification of mail is governed by laws fitted to another generation;

it takes no heed of the problems of the day." 1905. The Post-Office: Its Facts and its Possibilities. R. R. Bowker. American

Monthly Review of Reviews, vol. 31 (Mar., 1905): 325–332. Newspaper postage,

pp. 327–328. A reformed system of rates, page 332 1905. Post-Office Reform. An interview with Third Assistant Postmaster-General

Madden. Charles L. Benjamin. Printers' Ink, vol. 52 (July 5, 1905): 10–19. 1906. Postal Rates and Literature. Charles William Burrows. Yale Review, vol. 14

(Feb., 1906): 343–360. “It would seem beyond belief that these flagrant abuses, which have become so menacing, should go on uninterruptedly. Their palpable obstruction of all advance in line with public welfare must arouse a storm of oppo

sition when it is once generally understood.” IV. SECOND-Class Mail MATTER: SPEECHES IN THE CONGRESSIONAL GLOBE AND

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD. 1842. Bill to reduce and equalize the rates of postage. Debated by Senators Merrick,

Buchanan, Walker, and others. July 22–27, 1842. (In Congressional Globe, 27th Congress, 2d session, vol. 9, pp. 776, 781, 786, 795–796.)

page 417.

1844. The post office laws. Remarks of Senator Merrick, January 22, 1844. (In

Congressional Globe, 28th Congress, 1st session, vol. 12, pp. 171–172.) Contains

remarks on reduction of postage on newspapers. 1844. Reduction of postage and abatement of the franking privilege. Remarks by

Senators Merrick, Buchanan, Woodbury, Evans, and others, March 22, April 23, 1844. (In Congressional Globe, 28th Congress, 1st session, vol. 12, pp. 422-424,

547-548.) 1844. Reduction of postage and abatement of the franking privilege. Speech of

Senator Merrick, March 29, 1844. (In Congressional Globe, 28th Congress, 1st

session, vol. 12, pp. 457-459.) 1845. Post-office reforms. Debated by Senators Merrick, Simmons, Breese, Woodbury,

Ashley, Phelps, McDuffie, and others, January 28, 1845–March 1, 1845. (In Congressional Globe, 28th Congress, 2d session, vol. 14, pp. 205–206, 212–215, 220-22],

234, 238-240, 252, 254, 257-258, 260-264, 375–376.) 1845. Post-office bill. Debated by Messrs. Hopkins, Rathbun, Hamlin, Payne, Cobb,

Yancey, and others, February 24, 25, 27, 1945. (In Congressional Globe, 28th Con

gress, 2d session, vol. 14, pp. 337–340, 347–349, 353–354.) 1845. Speech of Senator John M. Niles on the bill to reduce the rates of postage, etc.,

January 16, 1845. (In Congressional Globe, 28th Congress, 2d session, vol. 14,

Appendix, pp. 209–212.) 1845. Speech of Amasa Dana, in the House of Representatives, February 25, 1845, on

the bill to reduce the rates of postage. (In Congressional Globe, 28th Congress,

2d session, vol. 14, Appendix, pp. 227–229.) 1845. Speech of Thomas J. Paterson, in the House of Representatives, March 1, 1845,

on post-office reform and the reduction of the rates of postage. (In Congressional

Globe, 28th Congress, 2d session, vol. 14, Appendix, pp. 246-252.) 1845. Speech of Senator William D. Merrick, on the bill to reduce the rates of postage,

etc., January 27, 1845. (In Congressional Globe, 28th Congress, 2d session, vol. 14,

Appendix, pp. 263–267.) 1845. Speech of William L. Yancey, in the House of Representatives, February, 1845,

on the bill to reduce the rates of postage. (In Congressional Globe, 28th Congress,

2d session, vol. 14, Appendix, pp. 307-308.) 1845. Speech of Senator James F. Simmons, February 6, 1845. (In Congressional

Globe, 28th Congress, 2d session, vol. 14, Appendix, pp. 364-367.) 1846. New postage bill. Remarks of W. P. Thomasson in the House of Representa

tives, July 28, 1846. (In Congressional Globe, 29th Congress, Ist session, vol. 15,

Appendix, pp. 1154-1155.) 1848. Reduction of postage. Remarks of Senator John M. Niles, June 21, 1848. (In

Congressonal Globe, 30th ('ongress, 1st session, vol. 17, Appendix, pp. 705–706.) 1849. Reduced rates of postage. Debated by Senators Niles, Underwood, Allen,

Foote, Cameron, Hamlin, W'escott, and others, January 17, 19, 1849. (In Con

gressional Globe, 30th Congress, 2d session, vol. 18, pp. 275-280, 300-302.) 1849. Speeches of Senator William Allen, on reduction of postage, January 24, Febru

ary 5, 1849. (In Congressional Globe, 30th Congress, 2d session, vol. 18, pp. 342–

346, 442-445.) 1849. Speech of Senator John M. Niles, on reduction of rates of postage, February 5,

1849. (In ('ongressional Globe, 30th Congress, 2d session, vol. 18, pp. 445–447.) 1849. Reduction of the rates of postage. Speech of Senator John M. Niles, February

2, 1849. (In Congressional Globe, 30th Congress, 2d session, vol. 18, Appendix,

pp. 81-86.) 1849. Postage reform. Speech of W. L. Goggin, in the House of Representatives,

February 21, 1849. (In (ongressional Globe, 30th ('ongress, 2d session, vol. 18,

Appendix, pp. 139–144.) 1850-1851. The cheap postage bill. Debated by Messrs. Potter, Cartter, Sackett,

Ashmun, Brown, Thompson, Morse, Taylor, Green, Conger, Thurston, Wentworth, Watkins, and others, December 18, 19, 31, 1850, January 4, 11, 13–17, 1851. (In Congressional Globe, 31st Congress, 2d session, vol. 23, part 1, pp. 70-76, 84–93,

139-145, 165-171, 216–225, 227-229, 232-239, 240–246, 252-262, 264-267.) 1851. Reduction of postage. Debated by Senators Rusk, Gwin, Borland, and others,

February 24, 1851. (In Congressional Globe, 31st Congress, 2d session, vol. 23,

part 1, pp. 672–675.) 1851. Reduction of postage. Debated by Senators Rusk, Seward, Dayton, Hamlin,

Chase, and others, February 17-20, 1851. (In Congressional Globe, 31st Congress,

2d session, vol. 23, part 2, Appendix, pp. 256–275.) 1852. Postage rates. Debated by Messrs. Olds, Brooks, Skelton, and others, in the

House of Representatives, July 9, 10, 1852. (In Congressional Globe, 32d Congress, 1st session, vol. 24, part 3, pp. 1711-1713, 1725-1728.)

« AnteriorContinuar »