Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

can work recently published, Andrews's Latin Lexicon; the other references need no particular explanation.

The Life of Horace, which has been written for the work, together with the brief estimate connected with it of the character and writings of the poet, will perhaps be a source of some interest and value to the student.

The illustrations, which have been introduced with a view at once to the embellishment and the usefulness of the book, have been, with three exceptions, taken from Rich's Illustrated Companion; those on pages 204 and 241 have been taken from Becker's Gallus, and the one on page 309 from Milman's elegant edition of Horace.

It is hoped that the superior mechanical execution of the volume will gain the attention and praise which it merits; and I cannot but acknowledge the very liberal manner in which the Publishers have superintended it, sparing no pains or expense to make it as perfect as possible.

I avail myself of this opportunity to make my grateful acknowledgments to Professors and Classical Teachers for the very favorable reception which they have given to my edition of Livy; and to express the hope that the present work, the result of a larger experience and of more extended labors, may be found not unworthy of their approbation.

J. L. LINCOLN.

BROWN UNIVERSITY, February 22d, 1851.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]
[ocr errors]

NOTES.
THE ODES, Book FIRST

SECOND
THIRD

FOURTH
THE BOOK OF EPODES
INTRODUCTION TO THE SECULAR HYMN
NOTES ON THE
INTRODUCTION TO THE SATIRES
THE SATIRES, Book FIRST

SECOND
INTRODUCTION TO THE EPISTLES
THE EPISTLES, Book FIRST

SECOND .
INTRODUCTION TO THE EPISTLE TO THE Pisos
NOTES ON THE
INDEX OF PROPER NAMES .

313 349 369 403 421 436 437 439 440 468 493 495 519 529 530 653

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

LIFE OF HORACE.

QUINTUS HORATIUS Flaccus was born on the 8th of December, in the year U. C. 689, B. C. 65, in the consulship of L. Aurelius Cotta and L. Manlius Torquatus. His birthplace was Venusia, a municipal town in Apulia, close by the borders of Lucania;a where his father, who belonged to the humble class of freedmen,: owned a small farm, with the care of which, yielding as it did but a scanty revenue, he united the business of a collector 5 of payments at auctions. On this farm, not far from the banks of “the far-sounding Aufidus," and amid the varied scenery of one of the most romantic districts of Italy, the poet passed the years of his infancy and early boyhood. The story recorded in one of his Odes? of his preservation by “ the fabled wood-pigeons” from the bears and serpents of Mount Vultur-his earliest experience of the Muses' care 8 and the presage of his future fame—is a pleasant recollection of his childhood; and the charming picture, in the same passage, of the places in the neighborhood, and numerous allusions:

*0. 3, 21, 1; Epod. 13, 6; Epist. 1, 20, 27; Suet. Vita Hor. 6.
» 0. 3, 4, 9-13; Sat. 2, 1, 34.
• Sat. 1, 6, 6 & 45; Epist. 1, 20, 20; cf. O. 2, 20, 5; ib.3, 30, 12.
* Sat. 1, 6, 71; cf. Epist. 2, 2, 50.
• Sat. 1, 6, 86; Suet Vita. Hor. 1.
6 0. 4,9, 2; cf. O. 3, 30, 10.
' 0.3, 4, 9.
$ 0. 3, 4, 20.

• 0.3, 13, 1; ib. 30, 10; ib. 4, 9, 2; ib. 4, 14, 25; Epod. 2, 42; ib. B, 16;

Sat. 1, 1, 58; ib. 1, 9, 29; ib. 2, 2.

of age,

in his writings to the people and the scenes of his early years, bear witness to the impressions they then made upon his sus ceptible spirit, and to the fond remembrance with which he turned back to them in all his after life.

The father of Horace, though of servile origin, was an upright, intelligent man, and of a turn of mind that was generous and truly noble; and whether from the workings of his own impulses, or from his discernment in the boy of signs of high promise, he early resolved to devote his time, his personal efforts, and his slender resources, to the moral and intellectual culture of his son. The first fruits of this noble resolve were reaped by the poet, as he tells us himself,' in a fine strain of filial pride, when, in his boyhood, perhaps about twelve

years he had got beyond the first rudiments of learning. His worthy father, unwilling to send him to the municipal school of Flavius ? at Venusia, boldly ventured to bring him to Rome, and to give him the liberal education of a knight's or a senator's son. While, however, he was ambitious that the mind of his son should be trained and developed at the best schools and under the best intellectual influences of the metropolis, he was equally careful to keep his heart secure from its vicious allurements; he always attended him in person to all his teachers ;by judicious counsels and warnings he guarded and strengthened his expanding character ;5 " SO that the boy escaped not merely the taint, but even the reproach of immorality.” To one of his teachers, “ the flogging Orbilius," 6 the poet has given an immortal fame; with him he read the poems of Livius Andronicus; and the impressive lessons of the hard disciplinarian he seems to have long remembered, though probably at the time, and certainly in after life, the writings of Livius, and indeed all the old Roman poetry, were not at all to his taste.8 With Orbilius, or some other teacher, he studied Homer ;9 probably he read other

4

* Sat. 1, 6, 71–80.

? Sat. 1, 6, 72.

. Sat. 1, 6, 77. Sat, 1, 6, 81.

· Sat. 1, 4, 105 seqq. Plagosum Orbilium, Epist. 2, 1, 70. ' Epist. 2, 1, 69–71. Epist 2, 1, passim.

Epist. 2, 2. 41; cf. Epist. 1, 2, 1 & 2.

9

« AnteriorContinuar »