A Little Earnest Book Upon a Great Old Subject: With the Story of the Poet-lover

Portada
Darton, 1851 - 196 páginas

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 123 - Full little knowest thou, that hast not tried, What hell it is in suing long to bide ; To lose good days that might be better spent ; To waste long nights in pensive discontent ; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow ; To feed on hope ; to pine with fear and sorrow ; To have thy Prince's grace, yet want her peer?
Página 153 - The intelligible forms of ancient poets, The fair humanities of old religion, The power, the beauty, and the majesty...
Página 55 - They never fail who die In a great cause : the block may soak their gore ; Their heads may sodden in the sun ; their limbs Be strung to city gates and castle walls — But still their spirit walks abroad. Though years Elapse, and others share as dark a doom, They but augment the deep and sweeping thoughts Which overpower all others, and conduct The world at last to freedom.
Página 39 - Ne'er tell me of glories serenely adorning The close of our day, the calm eve of our night : — Give me back, give me back the wild freshness of Morning, Her clouds and her tears are worth Evening's best light.
Página 129 - Hast thou ever raised thy mind to the consideration of existence, in and by itself, as the mere act of existing? Hast thou ever said to thyself thoughtfully, It is! heedless in that moment, whether it were a man before thee, or a flower, or a grain of sand, without reference, in short, to this or that particular mode or form of existence?
Página 123 - So passeth in the passing of a day Of mortal life the leaf, the bud, the flower; Ne more doth flourish after first decay, That erst was sought to deck both bed and bower Of many a lady and many a paramour ! Gather therefore the rose whilst yet is prime, For soon comes age that will her pride deflower ; Gather the rose of love whilst yet is time, Whilst loving thou mayst loved be with equal crime.
Página 136 - Unhonour'd falls, unnoticed all his worth, Denied in heaven the soul he held on earth : While man, vain insect ! hopes to be forgiven, And claims himself a sole exclusive heaven.
Página 17 - He saw thro' life and death, thro' good and ill, He saw thro' his own soul. The marvel of the everlasting will, An open scroll, Before him lay : with echoing feet he threaded...
Página 123 - To have thy asking, yet wait many years; To fret thy soul with crosses and with cares; To eat thy heart through comfortless despairs; To fawn, to crouch, to wait, to ride, to run, To spend, to give, to want, to be undone.
Página 123 - What hell it is, in suing long to bide; To lose good days, that might be better spent; To waste long nights in pensive discontent; To speed today, to be put back tomorrow; To feed on hope, to pine with fear and sorrow; To have thy Princess grace, yet want her Peers...

Información bibliográfica