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4

7,312
8, 180
1, 251
1, 087

319

4,537

531
256
661
785

2, 644 | 1, 269
268 57

29
898 185
862 45

1,370

29

2
102
45

856
60
12
181
22

380
19

2
109

18, 068
25, 724
2,816
4, 464
3, 168

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GENERAL RECAPITULATION, UNITED

STATES.

1, 017

Departmental service
Post-oflice service.
Government printing service
Custom-house service..
Internal-revenue service

9, 225 5, 650
8,429 2, 530
1, 109 06

212 322
770 49

37
578

Total executivo civil serv.

ice, United States...

19, 745 8,617 | 1, 666 10,605 18, 179

6, 770

4,701

1,563 | 1, 570

1, 131

510

84, 240

26

10 2,061

97

6

570

98

2, 842

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Approximate statement of the number of civil officers of the United States, etc.—Continued.

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ADDITIONS UNDER REVISION OF THE RULES.

The following are the bureaus, commissions, offices, and organizations brought into the classified service under the revision of the civil-service rules on May 6, 1896, and amendments thereto, and the officer in charge of each:

The Executive Office. The private secretary of.
The Interstate Commerce Commission. The president of.
Force in the State, War, and Navy building. The superintendent of.

The Smithsonian Institution, being the National Museum, the National Zoological Park, the Bureau of American Ethnology, the Astrophysical Observatory, and the Bureau of International Exchanges. The Secretary of.

The forco in custom-houses where the employees number less than twenty and now number as many as five. The Secretary of the Treasury.

The internal-revenue service at largo extended to include all employees classifiable under the law. The Secretary of the Treasury.

The United States mint at Philadelphia, Pa.: General department, coiner's department, melter and refiner's department, assayer's department, and engraver's department. The superintendent of.

The United States mint at San Francisco, Cal.: General department, coiner's department, melter and refiner's department, and assayer's department. The superintendent of.

The United States mint at New Orleans, La.: General department, coincr's department, melter and refiner's department, and assayer's department. The superintendent of.

The United States mint at Carson City, Nev.: General department, melter and refiner's department, and assayer's department. The superintendent of.

Tho United States mint at Denver, Colo.: General department and melter's department. The assayer at.

The assay office at Helena, Mont.: Assayer's department and melter's department. The assayer at.

Tho assay office at New York, N. Y.: General department, assay department, and melter and refiner's department. The superintendent of.

Tho assay office at Boise, Idaho: The assayer at.
The assay office at St. Louis, Mo.: The assayer at.
The assay office at Charlotte, N. C.: The assayer at.
The Revenue-Cutter Service at large. 'The Secretary of the Treasury.
The Life-Saving Service at large: Twelve districts. The Secretary of the Treasury.
The Light-House Board at large: Sixteen districts. The Secretary of the Treasury.
The Marine-Hospital Service at large. The Secretary of the Treasury.

The Steamboat-Inspection Service at large: Ten districts. The Secretary of the Treasury.

The subtreasurios at Baltimore, Md.; Boston, Mass.; Chicago, Ill.; Cincinnati, Ohio; New Orleans, La.; New York, N. Y.; Philadelphia, Pa.; St. Louis, Mo., and San Francisco, Cal. The Secretary of the Treasury.

The immigration service, tho special Treasury agents, the special inspectors of customs, the Chinese inspectors, the immigrant inspectors, the shipping commissioners, the special Treasury employees, and the field force, Coast and Geodetic Survey. The Secretary of the Treasury.

The internal-revenue agents. The Commissioner of Internal Revenue.

The Engineer Department at large, with about fisty divisions. The Secretary of War.

The Ordnance Department at large, being arsenals at Allegheny, Pa.; Augusta, Ga.; Benicia, Cal.; Columbia, Tenn.; Fort Monroe, Va.; Frankford, Pa. (shops); Indianapolis, Ind.; Kennebec, Me.; New York, N. Y.; Rock Island, Ill. (shops); San Antonio, Tex.; Watertown, Mass. (shops); Watervliet, N. Y. (shops); proving

ground, Sandy Hook, N. J.; powder depot, St. Louis, Mo.; powder depot, near Dover, N. J.; armory, Springfield, Mass. (shops); Rock Island Bridge, Rock Island, Ill. ; training ground, Sea Girt, N.J. The commanding officer at.

Interior Department: District land offices; offices of surveyors-general; Indian service, extensions in; pension agencies; Alaska school service; office of the Architect of the Capitol; Government Hospital for the Insane; Freedmen's Hospital; superintendent hospital at Hot Springs, and pension examining surgeons. The Secretary of the Interior.

Post-Office Department: Mail-bag repair shop; mail-lock repair shop; stampedenvelope agency; postage-stamp agency; postal-card agency. The PostmasterGeneral.

Department of Justice: United States Penitentiary, Fort Leavenworth, Kans.; clerks to United States district attorneys; office deputy marshals and clerical assistants; examiners in Departments. The Attorney-General.

Library of Congress. Pending.
The force under custodians of public buildings. The Secretary of the Treasury.

The force in the public service employed on public buildings under construction. The Secretary of the Treasury,

All officers and employees outside the District of Columbia, of whatever designation, who are serving as clerks, watchmen, messengers, physicians, hospital stewards, nurses, those who have medical duties, draftsmen, civil engineers, steam engineers, electrical engineers, computers, firemen. The head of the Department.

ACTION OF CONGRESS AND THE EXECUTIVE WITH REFERENCE TO THE

CIVIL-SERVICE LAW.

GROWTH OF THE MERIT SYSTEM SINCE 1883.

The civil-service act was approved on January 16, 1883. It took effect from its passage. One of its provisions allowed vacancies in the service to be filled according to the old methods until July 16; but after that date none within the sphere of its first application could be filled except by persons who had been duly examined. In the Departments at Washington the classification embraced all persons receiving salaries of not less than $900 nor more than $1,800 a year-altogether 5,652—of whom 135 were excepted from examination. The classification of the customs service embraced places having an annual compensation of $900 or over, at ports whero 50 or more persons were employed, excluding only those whose nominations had to be confirmed by the Senate. The number of places thus classified, including eleven ports, was 2,573. The number of post-offices classified-being those at which there were 50 or more employees—was 23, and the classified service at these offices included all persons above the grade of workman or laborer except the postmaster, or 5,699 in all. In the three branches of the classified service, therefore, the total number of places made subject to the provisions of the civil-service rules was 13,924. In 1884 the post-offices at Minneapolis, St. Paul, Jersey City, and New Haven, having attained the requisite number of employees, were classified, as was also the Department of Agriculture. During 1884 the classifications of several of the Departments were extended so as to embrace places not theretofore included within them. A detailed history of the changes in the classifications, by their revision, is contained in the Fourth Report of the Commission, at pages 102–114.

On March 1, 1888, President Cleveland made an order classifying the United States Civil Service Commission. On June 29, 1888, the classifications of the departmental service at Washington were revised and extended so as to embrace all the officers, clerks, and other employees in the Departments, except those appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, and those employed merely as messengers, watchmen, workmen, or laborers. Altogether 1,931 places were added to the classified service by this extension. The railway mail service,

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with 5,320 employees, was classified December 31, 1888. On January 4, 1889, rules for that service were promulgated to take effect March 15, 1889. During the Administration of President Cleveland 16 post-offices, having attained tho required 50 employees, were classified. The whole number of places thus added to the classified service, including those in the 16 post-offices just mentioned, was about 8,100, though this does not include the places resulting from the natural growth of the service. On March 4, 1889, the number of classified places in the departmental service was about 8,212, in the Customs service about 2,298, and in the postal service about 11,500; making a total, including the railway mail service, of about 27,330 places.

The railway mail rules went into effect under President Harrison on May 1, 1889, instead of March 15, it being found impossible to provide eligible registers at an earlier date. The extensions of the classified service from March 4, 1889, to March 4, 1893, were as follows: On April 13, 1891, the President classified certain classes of school employees and the physicians in the Indian service, about 626 employees in all. On May 5, 1892, the Fish Commission was classified as a part of the departmental service, bringing in 140 employees. Ten post-offices, upon attaining the requisite number of employees-50—were classified, and rules for the railway mail service put into effect. On the 5th of January, 1893, the President amended Postal Rule I so as to include in the classified postal service all free-delivery post-offices, adding to that branch of the classified service 548 offices not heretofore classified and the 7,610 persons employed therein. On the same day he amended the classification of the Department of Agriculture so as to include therein the employees of the Weather Bureau at work elsewhere than at Washington, 314 in number. The whole number of places covered by extensions of classifications during the Administration of President Harrison, including those which came under the rules by their automatic operation in the 10 post-offices above mentioned, was about 9,190, besides those resulting from the growth of the service. At the close of the Administration of President Harrison thero were in the classified service about 42,928 places.

To recapitulate: The original classification of the civil service embraced 13,924 places. On March 4, 1885, the total number of places in the classified service was about 15,573, being an increase of 1,649, including tho new post-offices and some 550 places added by Executive order in the revision and extension of the classifications. On March 4, 1889, the total number of places in the classified service was about 27,330, an increase during four years of 11,757, including the new post-offices, and 8,100 places added by Executive order. On January 18, 1893, the total was about 42,928, an increase from March 4, 1889, of 15,598 places, including the new post-offices and some 9,190 places added by Executive order.

The deficiency act of March 3, 1883, provided, in addition to three Commissioners at an annual salary of $3,500 each, and one chief examiner at $3,000, for one secretary at $1,600, ono stenographer at $1,600, and one messenger at $600, making a total expense for salaries of $17,300. The first session of the Forty-eighth Congress, in 1885, increased the salary of the secretary $100, that of the messenger $240, and provided for a clerk at $1,200, making a total increase of $1,810, and reduced the appropriation for traveling expenses from $4,000 to $3,500. The second session, in 1886, increased the salary of the stenographer $200 and gave an additional clerk at $1,400 and a laborer at $660, making an increase of $2,260.

By the appropriation act of July 1, 1886, the clerical force of the Commission was increased by one clerk at $1,600 and two at $900, and the appropriation for traveling expenses was restored from $3,500 to $4,000. By the appropriation act of March 3, 1887, the Coinmission obtained an additional clerk at $1,000, and by the appropriation act of July 11, 1888, an additional clerk at $1,600, one at $1,400, and one at $1,000, besides an increase of $1,000 in traveling expenses. By the appropiation act of February 26, 1889, $250 was added to the appropriation for traveling expenses. The total increase under the first Administration of President Clereland was $10,150.

By the appropriation act of July 11, 1890, the Commission obtained five additional

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