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XXXII.-TURKISH EMPIRE.

1. OTTOMAN PORTE.

Na From whom and to whom. | Date.

Subject.

Page.

1100 1104 1105

........

1106

1872. Mr. Boker to Mr. Fish...... Oct. 1 Judicial reforms in Egypt ................... ......do ........

Oct. 20 Ministerial changes; general politics ....... ..... ---...do ................... Nov. 30 Necessity of a national vessel at Beirut ...........

1873. ...... do

Mar. 18 Slave-trade between the Barbary States and Con

stantinople.
. Mar. 20 Changes in the Turkish cabinet.............

April 4 Judicial reforms in Egypt.........................
.......

April 14 Exportation of Arab horses and of wheat forbidden
April 15 Change of ministry; general considerations ......
April 19 | Protocol extending European capitulations to

Tripoli.
April 21 | Judicial reforms in Egypt.........................

May 16 Changes in the ministry ....
........

May 29 | Great Britain accepts the plan for judicial reform

in Egypt.
July 2 The new political relations with Egypt ...........

1107 1108 1109 1:10 1111

1112 1117

..........

1118

..do ........

1119

2. EGYPT.

1872

1119

1122

1123

454 / Mr. Beardsley to Mr. Hale.. Oct. 16 Operations of Egyptian troops in the country of

Borgos. 465 Mr. Beardsley to Mr. Fish .. Nov. 15 The Sultan's firman of September 10, and the Hatt

of September 25, 1872, regulating the relations

between Egypt and the Ottoman Porte. .....do ........

Dec. 12 Railroad connections with Upper Egypt. Political

relations with Abyssinia.
1873.
Jan. 3 Sir Bartle Frere; suppression of the slave-trade..
Jan. 7 Arrival of the Congress at Alexandria ............
Jan. 25 National schools at Cairo; distribution of prizes..
Feb. 15 | Marriage of Prince Hassan and the marriage fes.

tivities.

Feb. 24 The Soudan railway .......... ...... do .......

Feb. 25 Arrival of the Hartford at Port Said ............ ......do .....

April 3 Arrival of the Wabash and Wachusett at Alex

andria; visit to Suez Canal.

1124 1125 1125 1126

.....

1127 1129 1129

3. TUNIS.

1130

1133

1872. 474' Ur. Heap to Mr. Hunter.... Dec. 31 Review of the political, financial, agricultural, and

industrial condition of the Regency for the year. 475 ...... do .........

Dec. 31 Murder of the United States Consular Agent at

Bizerta.

1873. 476 ......do

April 8 Same subject. Obstacles in the way of punishing

the murderers.

1133

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1136

1873. 477 Mr. Heap to Mr. Hunter.... May 29 Same subject. Interview with the Bey; the Con

sul informs him that a naval force will be sent

to Tunis. 478 ......do

..........

.......... June 2 Same subject. Trial of the murderers ............ 479 ......do .........

June 7 French occupation of a portion of Tunisian ter

ritory. 480 ...... do

June 11 Official information respecting trial and sentence

of the murderers of the dragoman.

1136 1137

........

do

...............

1137

4. TRIPOLI.

1138

d

o

....

..

..

..

1141

..

.

.

1144 1145

1871. Mr. Vidal to Mr. Hunter.... April 10 Visit of the Guerriere to Tripoli. She takes away

the main anchor of the Philadelphia. 482 ......do .........

May 26 Visit of the Guerriere. No consular flags hoisted.

Details of the reception by the Pasha.

1872. 483 ......

Dec. 28 Slave-trade between Tripoli and Constantinople

| by way of Malta.

1873. 484 ......do ........

Jan. 6 | Same subject ......... 485 ......do ........

Feb. 14 Efforts of New York Bible Society in Roumania

would be more advantageonsly employed on the
coast of Africa. Social, political, and religious

condition of the people.
486 ......do ......... ... Feb. 19 | Sketch of the political relations and connections

between Tripoli and the Ottoman Porte. 487 ......do

Feb. 25 Political relations between Tripoli and the Otto

man Porte. Reasons for regarding the treaties
between the United States and Tripoli as still

in force. 488 ......do ........

May 27 Speech of Lord Clarence Paget at Malta, indicat

ing a British intention of occupying a part of
the northern coast of Africa.

1157

1167

XXXIII.–VENEZUELA.

489 Mr. Pile to Mr. Fish .....

......do ................... ......do .................

1169 1170 1171

492 ...... do

1171

23 ......do .

1872.
Sept. 9 The steamer Virginius..........
Sept. 23 Same subject......................
Dec. 10 A German fleet at La Guaira................

1873.
May 7 Inclosing a copy of decrees issued by Guzman

Blanco, Dictator, and calling attention to laws

affecting foreigners domiciled in Venezuela. May 26 Political condition of the country. Extra session

of Congress. Questions with the United States,

&c.
June 27 Suspension of diplomatic relations between Vene-

zuela and Colombia. Action of Congress on the

claims of the United States.
July 1 Correspondence with the minister of foreign af

fairs respecting the authenticity of the message
of the President of Venezuela to Congress.

1172

......do

1174

1174

XXXIV.-PAPERS RELATING TO EXPATRIATION, NATURALIZATION, AND

CHANGE OF ALLEGIANCE.

[For a complete list of these papers see post pages 1180 to 1183.]

LIST OF PERSONS WHOSE CORRESPONDENCE WITH OR

FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE IS CONTAINED IN THIS VOLUME.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE. Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State. Charles Hale, Assistant Secretary of State. (Resignation took effect January 24, 1873.) J. C. Bancroft Davis, Assistant Secretary of State. (Appointed January 24, 1873.) William Hunter, Second Assistant Secretary of State.

ARGENTINE REPUBLIC.
Dexter E. Clapp, consul at Buenos Ayres, and chargé d'affaires ad interim.
Julius White, minister resident of the United States at Buenos Ayres.

AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN EMPIRE. John Jay, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States at Vienna.

John F. Delaplaine, secretary of legation and chargé d'affaires ad interim.

Baron Lederer, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the Emperor of Austria-Hungary at Washington.

BELGIUM J. Russell Jones, minister resident of the United States at Brussels. Maurice Delfosse, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the King of the Belgians at Washington.

BRAZIL.

James R. Partridge, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States at Rio de Janeiro.

R. C. Shannon, secretary of the legation of the United States at Rio de Janeiro, and chargé d'affaires ad interim.

CHILI. Joseph P. Root, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States at Santiago.

CHINA.

Frederick F. Low, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United
States at Peking.
David H. Bailey, consul of the United States at Hong-Kong.

COSTA RICA,
Jacob B. Blair, minister resident of the United States at San José.

DENMARK.
Michael J. Cramer, minister resident of the United States at Copenhagen.

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC.
D. Vickers, commercial agent of the United States at Samana.

ECUADOR.
E. Rumsey Wing, minister resident of the United States at Quito.

FRANCE. E. B. Washburne, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States at Paris.

Wickham Hoffman, secretary of legation of the United States at Paris, and chargé d'affaires ad interim. _Marquis de Noailles, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the French Republic at Washington.

GERMANY.

George Bancroft, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United · States at Berlin.

Alexander Bliss, secretary of legation of the United States at Berlin, and chargé d'affaires ad interim.

Kurd von Schlözer, envoy and minister plenipotentiary of the Emperor of Germany at Washington.

GREAT BRITAIN.

Robert C. Schenck, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States at London.

Benjamin Moran, secretary of legation of the United States at London, and chargé d'affaires ad interim.

Sir Edward Thornton, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of Her Britannic Majesty at Washington.

Archibald Campbell, United States commissioner on the commission for determining and marking the nortbern boundary of the United States.

GREECE.
John M. Francis, minister resident of the United States at Athens.

GUATEMALA.

Silas A. Hudson, minister resident of the United States at Guatemala.

HAYTI.

Ebenezer D. Bassett, minister resident of the United States and consul general at Port au Prince.

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.

Henry A. Pierce, minister resident of the United States at Honolulu.

ITALY. George P. Marsh, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States at Rome.

JAPAN. C. E. De Long, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States at Yedo.

MEXICO.

Thomas Nelson, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States at Mexico. (Resigned June 1, 1873.)

John W. Foster, enroy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United
States at Mexico' Entered on the duiies June 1, 1873.)

Porter C. Bliss, secretary of legation and chargé d'affaires ad interim.
W. Schuchardt, consul of the United States at Piedras Negras.

MOROCCO.
F. A. Mathews, consul of the United States at Tangier.

NETHERLANDS.
Charles T. Gorham, minister resident of the United States at the Hague.

NICARAGUA

Charles N. Riotte, minister resident of the United States at Leon.

PERU. Francis Thomas, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the United States at Lima.

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