Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

the same, or the proceeds thereof, together with all contributions made for this specific purpose, to the purcbase and improvement of the lands for such experimental farm. But if the said county of Dane, by its proper officers, shall not make provision for the issue and payment of said bouds as aforesaid within thirty days after the passage of this act, and if in such case the citizens of said county shall fail within days after the expiration of said first mentioned period of thirty days, to furnish guarantees satisfactory to the secretary of state, that the said amount of forty thousand dollars shall be placed at the disposal of the regents of the university, at the first meeting of the board, then this act shall be null and void.

$ 17. So much and such parts of chapter twenty-one of the revised statutes, and of any and all acts as contravene the provisions of this act, are hereby repealed.

$ 18. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage.

AN ACT TO AUTHORIZE THE INVESTMENT OF UNIVERSITY FUND IN CERTAIN BONDS

OF DANE County.

(Approved March 26, 1867.) Section 1. The commissioners of school and university lands are hereby authorized to invest a portion of the university fund, or of the agricultural college fund, or of both, in the bonds of the county of Dane, issued by said county and delivered to the regents of the university by virtue of chapter 114 of the general laws of 1866, entitled “An Act to reorganize and enlarge the University of Wisconsin, and to authorize the county of Dane to issue bonds in aid thereof."

§ 2. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage.

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

II. INSTITUTIONS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN THE PRINCIPLES

OF SCIENCE AND THEIR APPLICATIONS TO THE ARTS, NOT
AIDED BY CONGRESSIONAL OR STATE GRANTS.

SUPPLEMENT.

OFFICIAL CIRCULAR:-NO. 6.

CONTENTS.

233-310

215

237 249

253

259

267

273

277

279

I. COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, AND DEPARTMENTS OF SCIENCE,
Applied to the Industrial Arts, aided by National Land-Grant,

Continued, -
CONNECTICUT.

Sheffield Scientific School of Yale College, New Haven, MASSACHUSETTS.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston,

Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, New York.

Cornell University, Ithaca, PENNSYLVANIA.

State Agricultural College, Centre County, Michigan.

State Agricultural College, Lansing, MARYLAND.

State Agricultural College, Hyattsville, Prince George County, New HAMPSHIRE.

State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, Hanover, VERMONT.

State University and Agricultural College, Burlington, Iowa.

State Agricultural College and Model Farm, Story County, Wisconsin.

College of Arts—State University, Madison, WEST VIRGINIA.

State Agricultural College, Morgantown, NEW JERSEY.

State Agricultural and Mechanical Arts College, New Brunswick, KENTUCKY.

State Agricultural and Mechanical College, Lexington, CALIFORNIA.

State Agricultural, Mining and Mechanical Arts College, ΜΑΙΝΕ.

State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, Orono, RHODE ISLAND.

Brown University, Providence, Kansas.

State Agricultural College, Manhattan, Illinois.

State Industrial University, Urbana,

282

283

286

287

291

297

299

301

301

305

SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL OF YALE COLLEGE.

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

HISTORY

In the year 1846, a “Department of Philosophy and Art" was instituted in Yale College, on the same general principles as the Departments of Law, Medicine and Theology. One design in this movement was to secure better oppor. tunities of scientific instruction for chemists, agriculturists and other students who might or might not have been members of the Academical Department. A special “ Analytical Laboratory” was soon opened for the instruction of these scholars. Six years later a class in Engineering was commenced. These classes soon became known as the “Yale Scientific School,” and were the beginning of the present organization. In 1860, a liberal endowment was received from Joseph E. Sheffield, Esq., of New Haven, (amounting to upwards of $100,000, and subsequently increased by further gifts of $60,000) in consequence of which the name of “Sheffield Scientific School " was given to the establishment. The school, as enlarged and re-organized, was almost exactly such a college as was contemplated in the Act of Congress of July 2, 1862, so that the Legislature of Connecticut was led, almost unanimously, to bestow upon this department of Yale College the income of the fund derived from the sale of land scrip. The act directing this appropriation was approved June 24, 1863.

TRUSTEES.

The Trustees of the institution are the Corporation of Yale College, consisting of the President of the College and ten Clerical Fellows, the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and six senior Senators of the State. The Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and three senior Senators, with the Secretary of the State Board of Education constitute the State Board of Visitors, and with the Secretary of the School, the Board for the appointment of State Students. The following persons compose the Board of Visitors in September 1867:—His Excellency James E. English, his Honor E. H. Hyde, Hon. George Beach, Hon. M. T. Granger, Hon. A. J. Gallup, and Rev. B. G. Northrup. The Secretary of the School is Professor D. C. Gilman. The President of Yale College and the thirteen professors of this department form a “Governing Boerd,” responsible to the corporation.

SALE OF THE SCRIP.

The amount of the national land-grant conferred upon Connecticut was 180,000 acres. The scrip representing this endowment was sold by the Commissioner of the School Fund, in accordance with the directions of the Legislature, on terms approved by the Governor of the State, Hon. W. A. Buckingham. The price which it brought was 75 cts. per acre, yielding a capital of 155,000 dollars. This was first invested in United States Ten-Forty bonds, bearing interest in gold at the rate of 5 per ct. per annum; but subsequently the Legislalature directed that these securities should be sold and the proceeds invested, instead, in Connecticut State Bonds bearing interest at 6 per cent. in currency. The annual income from this fund is therefore $8,100.

OTHER FCNDS AND PROPERTY.

The school is the owner of a spacious and commodious edifice provided by Mr. Sheffield, at a cost, including outfit, &c., of about $100,000. It has invested funds, the gift of various parties, amounting to about $70,000,-and has also large collections of books, apparatus, instruments, and specimens in Natural History. Besides its own peculiar property, the school as a department of Yale College enjoys the advantages of the Public Library of the University, the Peabody Museum of Natural History, the Yale School of the Fine Arts, and other costly and serviceable endowments, which could not be replaced for half a million of dollars.

EXPERIMENTAL FARM.

No effort has been made to purchase a farm for experiment or practice. The funds of the institution are at present quite inadequate to this outlay; and the instructors believe that many if not all the advantages looked for in such an investment may be secured by observation and experiment on private farms in the neighborhood of New Haven, without expending any considerable sum in the purchase and management of a school farm, beyond a piece of ground suitable for a botanical garden and for occasional experimeuts, which would be a welcome accession to the school.

MANUAL LABOR.

There has been no proposal to require manual labor of the students, nor would the suggestion meet with favor. Some of the students of their own accord take part in mechanical pursuits or other industrial occupations,—and there are abundant opportunities for physical exercise in the scientific excur. sions which are kept up through the summer, and also in the college gymnasium, and in boating, skating, etc.

MILITARY INSTRUCTION.

а

Thus far military instruction has been given by an annual course of lectures from a Prussian military officer, who was a Brigadier General in the recent war for the Union. He has expounded the principles of strategy and tactics, with diagrams and other means of illustration, in an interesting and profitable man.

The provisions for military instruction proposed by Congress in the act of July 26, 1836, are now under consideration by the authorities of Yale Col. lege, and their action may modify these existing arrangements.

ner.

PUBLIC LECTURES.

Courses of public lectures have been given the last two years to mechanics in Sheffield Hall, and to farmers assembled in different parts of the State.

« AnteriorContinuar »