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SENIOR YEAR.

General Chemistry-Academical and Medical Lectures. Agricultural Chemistry and PhysiologyLectures. Laboratory Practice-Quantitative Mineral Analysis. Assaying. Organic Analysis. Special Investigation for Graduating Thesis. Mineralogy-Identification of Species. Metallurgy-Lectures. Geology Dana's Manual. Recitations and Academical Lectures. Human Anatomy and Physiology-Academical Lectures. Mechanics, Steam Engine and other Prime Moters-Lectures. French (see Select Course).

2,-CIVIL ENGINEERING.

JUNIOR YEAR.

Mathematics—Descriptive Geometry, with applications. Shades, Shadows and Linear Perspective. Analytical Geometry of three dimensions. Differential and Integral Calculus. Astronomy-Theoretical Astronomy. Practical Problems. French and German. Practical SurveyingTriangulation, Surveying of a Harbor, etc. Topographical Surveying. Drawing—Isometrical, Topographi

, cal, Mechanical.

SENIOR YEAR.

Mechanics—Theoretical Mechanics. Applications of Calculus to Mechanics. Mechanics applied to Engineering. Principles of Mechanism. Thermo-dynamics. Theory of Steam Engine. Prime Movers. Civil EngineeringStrength and Stiffness of Materials. Bridge Construction. Stability of Arches. Stone-cutting, with graphical problems. Constitution and properties of Building Materials. Civil Engineering proper, or the Science of Construction. Geology, French-Selections. Field Engineering and Surveying-Location of Roads. Laying out Curves. Geodesy. Designing-Designing of Bridges and other Structures. Drawing-Architectural and Structural.

3,-MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.

JUNIOR YEAR.

French and German-(see Select Course). Descriptive Geometry, with Applications. Analytical Geometry of Three Dimensions. Elementary Mechanics. Principles of Mechanism. Differential and Integral Calculus. Metallurgy. Shades, Shadows, and Linear Perspective. Isometrical Projection. Elements of Mechanical Drawing and Principles of Construction. Shading and Tinting, and drawing from patterns.

SENIOR YEAR.

French and German (see Select Course). Analytical Mechanics—Strength of Materials. Thermo-dynamics. Theory and Construction of the Steam Engine. Prime Movers. Theory of Machines. Mill work. Examination of Machinery. Mechanical Construction. Machine shop Practice. Architectural Drawing. Drawing from actual Machines. Designs of Machines.

4,-MINING AND METALLURGY.

JUNIOR YEAR.

French and German (see Select Course). Mechanics—Peck’s Elements. Principles of Mechanism. Theory of Steam Engine. Mathematics— Mining Surveying-Shades, Shadows and Linear Perspective. Isometrical Projection. Civil Engineering—Strength of Materals. Stability of Arches. Higher and Topographical Surveying. Geology, Dana. DrawingMechanical and Topographical.

SENIOR YEAR.

French (see Select Course). Mining_Lectures. General and Special Metallurgy-Lectures. General Chemistry—Miller. Chemical Analysis~Fresenius. Recitations and Lectures. Laboratory Practice-Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. Use of the Blowpipe. Assaying. Mineralogy-Lectures and Practical Exercises. Zoology-Lectures. Mechanics—Application to Engineering. Drawing,

5,-AGRICULTURE.

JUNIOR YEAR.

Agricultural Chemistry and PhysiologyStructure and Physiology of Plants; Water, Atmosphere, and Soil in their relations to Vegetable Production, Improvement of the Soil by Chemical and Mechanical means. Domestic Animals; the chemical relations of their Food, Digestion, Respiration, Assimilation and Excretions; Milk, Butter, Cheese, Flesh, and Wool as Agricultural Products. Lectures. Experimental and Analytical Chemistry, Laboratory Practice. Meteorology- Academical Lectures. Physical GeographyLectures. ZoologyLectures. Drawing-Free-hand practice. French and German-Continued. Excursions—Botanical, Zoological, etc.

SENIOR YEAR.

Agriculture—The staple crops of the United States, their varieties, cultivation, management, and preparation for market. The Care, Breeding and Raising of Domestic Animals. Lectures and Recitations. Experimental Chemistry-Laboratory practice. Agricultural ZoologyNatural History of Domestic Animals ; Insects useful and injurious to Vegetation. Lectures. Human Anatomy and Physiology, Lectures. GeologyLectures and Recitations. Rural Economy, both American and Foreign. Lectures. French and German, continued. Eccursions—Botanical, Zoölogical, etc.

6,--NATURAL HISTORY AND GEOLOGY.

JUNIOR YEAR.

First Term.

Zoology-Daily Laboratory instruction ; Zoological Excursions. Botany, Gras's First Lessons. Chemistry—Academical Lectures. French and German -Selections.

Second Term.

Zoology and PaleontologyLaboratory Practice, Lectures. Physical GeographyLectures and Recitations. Chemistry—Laboratory Practice. French and German, continued.

Third Term.

Zoology and PaleontologyLaboratory Practice, Lectures, Excursions (land and marine). Botany,Gray's Manual; Excursions. MineralogyDana, Lectures and Practical Exercises. French, continued. Drawing-Free Hand Practice.

SENIOR YEAR.

First Term.

Zoology and PaleontologyLaboratory Practice, Lectures, Excursions. GeoLomi-Dana's Manual. Excursions. Meteorology-Academical Lectures. French -Selections.

Second Term. Zoology and Paleontology-Continued. BotanyLectures on special subjects. GeologyDana, Recitations and Lectures. Anatomy and PhysiologyAcademical Lectures. French-Selections.

Third Term. Zoology and Paleontology-Continued, with Excursions. PhotographyPractical Instruction,

7,-SELECT COURSE IN SCIENCE AND LITERATURE.

JUNIOR YEAR.

MODERN LANGUAGES.- French and German, continued. English Composition and Literature.

MATHEMATICS.—Peck's Mechanics, Norton's Astronomy.

NaturaL SCIENCE. --Agricultural Chemistry-Lectures. ZoologyLectures and Excursions. Botany--Lectures and Excursions. MineralogyLectures. Physical GeographyLectures and Recitations,

HISTORY.-Recitations.
DRAWING.–Free Hand, and Architectural.

SENIOR YEAR.

LANGUAGE.—French or German, continued. Lectures on Language and Lin. guistic Ethnology. Compositions.

Natural SCIENCE.— Botany and Zoology, continued. Geology-Recitations and Lectures. Meteorology-Lectures. Human Anatomy and PhysiologyLectures. Astronomy-Lectures.

PuILOSOPHY AND HISTORY.—Lectures and recitations, in History and Political Philosophy, International Law, Political Economy, Ethics and Metaphysics.

IL-PARTIAL COURSES LEADING TO NO DEGREES. A partial course in Agriculture, occupying seven months in the winter, is arranged for the convenience of those who cannot pursue a longer course of study.

Special students desirous to become proficient in some branch of Chemistry are also received in the Chemical Laboratory.

In Natural History arrangements are also made for the instruction of special students, not candidates for degrees. The same is true in Practicai Astronomy. No formal examinations are required for admission to these advantages, but they are only offered to young men who are able and disposed to be faithful in the pursuit of the courses they select.

III.-HIGHER COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY OR

OF CIVIL ENGINEER IN YALE COLLEGE.

A higher course in Civil Engineering is arranged to follow the regular three years' course, and those who pursue it faithfully may receive the degree of Civil Engineer. (C. E.)

Candidates for the Degree of Ph. Dr. must have taken already a Bachelor's Degree, and must pursue in this College, a course of two years' instruction in the higher studies of at least three departments of science, terminating with a satisfactory examination.

PLANS AND DESCRIPTION OF SHEFFIELD HALL, OF THE SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC

SCHOOL, YALE COLLEGE, NEW HAVEN, CONN. Sheffield Hall is situated in Grove street, fronting College street, nearly a quarter of a mile north of the College square. It is bui.t of stone and brick covered with stucco, and consists of a principal three story structure, and two wings (each of two stories,) now connected in the rear by another three story building. There are three public entrances on Grove street, of which the central one is the chief, leading to all portions of the building; the eastern door leads to the principal room of the Engineering Class and to the Metallurgical Museum above it; and the western door leads to the Chemical Laboratory.

There are two projecting towers—one in front, at the main entrance, and one at the northwest corner of the building. The principal tower in front is ninety feet high and sixteen feet square. In the second and third stories are studies for two of the professors. Above these rooms is the belfry-clock with its four dials, and surmounting the structure is a revolving turret in which the equatorial telescope is placed.

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No. 1, Recitation-room, in Mathematics, Physics, etc. " 2,

Engineering, etc. 3, Exhibition-room for engineering models, etc. “ 18, Drawing room for the Engineering and other classes. “ 19, Chemical Assistant's Office. 20, 20, Chemical Laboratory. L, Closet.-P, Balance-room.-Q, Store room.-R, Chemical reagent room.

The northwestern tower, sixteen feet square and fifty feet high, was built for the reception of a Meridian Circle.

The extreme length of the edifice from the western tower to the east side is 117 feet; and the extreme depth is 112 feet. The three cuts which are given herewith exhibit the arrangement of rooms on each of the three stories. The basement, which is not here represented, contains a Janitor's apartment, and a metallurgical laboratory, in addition to the hot-air furnaces, store rooms, etc.

The Observatory occupies the two towers, each sixteen feet square, recently added to the edifice. In one of these is mounted an EQUATORIAL TELESCOPE; in the other, a MERIDIAN CIRCLE, with a SIDEREAL CLOCK; both telescope and circle being the recent gifts of Mr. Sheffield.

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No. 4, Study-Prof. of Agriculture.

5, Recitation-room in Physical Geography, etc.
6, Study-Professor of Mining.
7, Recitation-room in Modern Languages, Mechanics, etc.

9, Metallurgical Museum.
“ 10, Agricultural Lecture-room.

11, Chemical Lecture-room. “ 12, Private Chemical Laboratory. “ 13, Study-Professor of Mineralogy and Metallurgy.

G, Study-Professor of Analytical and Agricultural Chemistry.

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