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Mann, Horace. Teachers' Motives, XIV. 277. Col- Olmsted, Dennison. Democratic Tendencies of Sci-

lege Government, III. 65. Special Training a Pre- ence, I, 164. Ideal of a Teacher; Timothy Dwight
requisite to Teaching, XIII, 507. Methods of Ed- V. 567.
ucation in Germany, VIII. 382. Results of Normal Osgood, S. G. Address at Dedication of School
Schools in Prussia, VIII. 361. Analysis of Reports, house, XIII. 848.
V, 623. Plan of District School-house, IX 642. Overberg, B. Educational Views, XIII. 365.
Estimate of S. G. Howe, XI. 389. Education de- Oven, R. Natural History in Public Schools, XVII,
fined, XIII. 16. The State and Education, XIII.

724; XV. 13. Normal Schools, XVI, 100. Page, D. P. Memoir and Processes of Teaching, V.
Mason, S. W. Physical Exercise in Schools, XIV. 61. 819. Education defined, XIII, 14.
Masson, D. College and Self-education, IV. 262. Paget, J. Physiology, XVII. 119.

Milton's Home, School, and College Training, XIV. Paley, Dr. Education defined, XI. 15.
159–190.

Palmerston, Lord. Popular Education, II. 712.
Mathews, J. D. Report on Schools of Kentucky, II. Park, Prof. The School of Locality, XVI. 33).
493.

Memoir of B. B. Edwards, XIV, 381.
May, S. J. Life and Views of Cyrus Peirce, IV. 275. Parr, Samuel. Principles of Education, XI. 17.
Educational Labors, XVI. 141.

Partridge, Alden. Educational Views, XIII, 54, 683.
Mayhew, Ira. School-houses of Michigan, IX. 515. Pattison. On Prussian Normal Schools, XVI. 395.
Educational Labors, XV, 651.

Paulet. System of Monitorinl Instruction, X, 464.
McElligott, J. N. Debating as a Means of Educa- Payson, T. Boston Association of Teachers, XV.
tional Discipline, I. 495.

533; X. 464.
Meierotto. Method of Teaching Latin, VI. 609. Peabody, George. Public Library of Baltimore, III.
Physical Culture, VIII. 191.

Peel, Sir R. Study of Classics, XVII.
Meiring. On the Hamiltonian System, VI. 592. 226. Educatioual Benefactions, XVII.
Melancthon. Life and Educational Services, IV, Peet, H. P. New York Institution for the Deaf and
741-764.

Dumb, III. 347. Memoir, III. 366.
Memminger, C. G. Schools of South Carolina, II. Peirce, B. K. Reformatory for Girls, XVI, 652.
553.

Peirce, Cyrus. Ideal of Education, IV. 285. Normal
Mill, John Stuart. State and Education, XIII. 721. Schools, IV. 306.
University Education, XVII,

Perkins, G. R. Labors in Normal Schools, XII.
Mills, Caleb. Report on Schools of Indiana, II. 480. 544.
Milton. Treatise on Education, II, 61. Education Perry, Gardner. On School-houses, IX. 520.

defined, XI. 12. The State and Education, XII. Perry, W. F. Schools of Alabama, II. 465.
719. His Home, School, and College Training, Pestalozzi. Life and Educational System, III, 401;
XIV. 159.

IV. 65. Pestalozzi and the Schools of Germany,
Molineux, E. L. Physical and Military Exercises in IX. 343. Pestalozzi, Fellenberg, and Webrli, X.
Schools a National Necessity, XI. 513.

81. Poor School at Neubof, III, 585. His Assist-
Montaigne. On Learning and Education, IV, 461. ants and Disciples, VII, 285. Hundredth Birthday,
Montucla. Elements of Euclid, VIII, 156.

V, 503. Publications by and relating to, VII. 513.
More, Sir Thomas. The State and Education, XIII. Selections from his Publications, VII. 519-722.
719. Education of his Children, XVII.

Evening Hours of a Hermit, VI. 169. Leonhard
Morrison, T. Manual of School Management, IX, and Gertrude, VII. 519. Christopher and Alice,
294. Oral Lessons, IX. 321.

VII. 665.

Account of his Educational Expe-
Moscherosch. Cited, VIII. 71; X, 190, 198.

rience and Methods, VII. 671.
Moseley, Canon. Tripartite System of Instruction, Petrarch, and Education in Italy, VII. 424.

IX. 316. English Training Colleges, X. 543-670. Petty, Sir W. Plan of a Trades School, 1647, XI, 199,
Mulcaster, R. Positions, XVII.

Peurbach, G. Method of Arithmetic, VIII, 170.
Muller, Max. French and German in Public Schools, Phelps, W. F. Normal Schools, III. 417. Educa-
XVII.

tional Labors, V. 7.

Philbrick, J. D. On the National Teachers' Associa-
Neander, Michel. Educational Labors, V, 599. tion, XIV. 49. Extracts from Reports, II. 261.
Niebuhr, B. S. Letter to a Student, XVI. 215. Report on Schools of Connecticut, II. 469. Plans
Niebuhr, J., and Pestalozzi, VII. 289.

of School-houses, X, 740; XVI, 701.
Niemeyer. Cited, VIII, 52, 56, 61, 67, 71; X. 118. Phillips, J. H. Schools of New Jersey, II. 517.
Nieuvenhuysen, and the Society for the Public Good Picket, A. Teachers' Association, XV, 493.
in Holland, XIV. 641.

Pierce, Benjamin. On a National University, II. 88.
Nissen, H. Public Schools in Norway, VIII. 295. Pierpont, J. Public High School for Girls, XIII. 244.

Pitt, Earl of Chatham. Studies and Conduct, XVII.
Ol erlin, John Friedrich. The Practical Educator, Plato. Cited, IV, 166; VIII, 11, 43, 76-78; X.
V. 505; XVII.

141, 157, 162, 167, 170, 194; XI, 101, 105; XII.
Oelinger, Albert, and the Study of German, XI, 406. 409; XIII. 8.

Plutarch. Views of Education, XI. 99–110. Cited, Ross, William. Cathechetical Method, IX, 368.
VIII. 77; X. 118-195.

Ross, W. P. Education among the Cherokees, I. 120
Poggius, and Education in Italy, VII. 442.

Rousseau, and his Educational Views, V, 459–186
Porter, J. A. Plan of an Agricultural School, I. 329. Education defined, XIII, 11.
Porter, Noah. Essuy on Educational Reform in Con- Rush, Benjamin. The State and Education, XV. 13

Decticut, XIV. 244. Norwich Free Academy, III, Ruskin, John. Material of Education, XI, 19.
200.

Russell, William. Principles and Methods of Inte -
Potter, Alonzo. Consolidation, &c., of American lectual Education, II, 113, 317; III, 47, 311; IV.

Colleges, I. 471. Moral and Religious Instruction, 199. Moral Education, IX, 19-48. National Or-
L. 169. School Houses in New York, IX. 507. ganization of Tenchers, XIV, 7. Educational La-
Normal Schools, XIII. 344. What and How to boss of Lowell Mason, IV. 141. Recollections of
Read, II, 215. Memoir, XVI. 599.

Josiah Holbrook, VIII. 339. Legal Recognition
Pullicino, and Education in Italy, II, 721.

of Teaching as a Profession, X. 297.
Pythagoras. Cited, VIII. 11, 12, 38, 43; X. 132, Russell, W. H. Plan of Gymnasium, IX. 534.
162, 166; XI, 109; XIII. 8, 81.

Ruthardt, J. C. Method of Teaching Latin and

Greek, VI, 600.
Quincy, Josiah. Girls' High School in Boston, XIII.

297. Phillips' Academy in 1778, XIII. 740. Sarmiento, D. F. The Schoolmaster's Work, XVI.
Quincy, Josian, Jr. School Policy of Boston, XII. 65. Basis of U. S. prosperity, XVI, 533. Educa-
706.

tional Labors, XVI, 593.
Quintilian. Views of Education, XI. 3.

Schmid, Joseph, and Pestalozzi, VII. 297.

Schmidt. Definition of Education, XIII. 9.
Rabelais, and his Educational Views, XIV. 147. Schottelius, J. G. Philological Labors, XI, 429.
Ramsauer. Memoir, VII, 301. Life at Hofwyl, IV. Schwartz. Cited, VIII. 34, 53; X. 164.
84, 119.

Sears, Barnas. Schools of Massachusetts, II, 498.
Ramsden. The Heart of a Nation, XI. 17.

Sears, E. I. Henry Lord Brougham, V, 467. Memoir.
Ramusat. Circular to Teachers, adopted by Guizot, Sedgwick, C. M. What and How to Read, II. 215.
XI. 278.

Seguin, E. Treatment and Training of Idiots, II. 145.
Randall, S. S. On Francis Dwight, V. 809. Josiah Seneca. Cited, VIII. 12–68; X. 135–196; XII. 409.

Holbrook. Educational Labors, XIII, 2:27. New Seton, S. S. Extracts from Manual, XIII. 858.
York Normal School, XIII. 532.

Shea, J. G. Catholic Institutions in the U. S., 435.
Raphall, H. L. Education among the Hebrews, I. Shearman, F. W. Schools in Michigan, II. 510.
243.

Sheldun, E. A. Object Teaching, XIV, 93.
Ratich. Life and Educational Methods, V. 229; XI. Shenstone, William. The Schoolmistress, with An-
418. On Teaching Latin, VI, 586.

notations, III. 449.
Raumer, Karl von. History of Education, q. v. under Shurtleff, N. B., Boston Latin School, XII. 559.

SECTION I. German Universities, VI. 9; VII, 47, Shuttleworth, Sir J. K. Educational Progress in En

160. Essays on University Reform, VII. 200. gland, III. 245. Vehrli, III. 392.
Raumer, Rudolf. Instruction in the German Lan- Schools, IX. 171-200.
guage, XI. 155, 419-429; XII. 460–527.

Sidney, Sir H. On Conduct, XV, 378.
Ravaidon, F. Instruction in Drawing, II. 319. Simonson, L. Cadet Systein in Switzerland, XIII.
Reid, D. B. College of Architecture, II. 629.

693.
Reisch, Gr orius. Murgurita Philoso ca, XVII. Simpson, J. Education defined, XIII. 13.
Roman System of Measures, XVII.

Slade, William. Education at the West, XV. 274.
Rendu, Eugen. Public Instruction in France and Smith, Adam. The State and Education, XIII. 720
Prussia, II. 337.

Smith, B. B. Visit to Radleigh School, IV. 803.
Reuchlin, and German Educators of the Fifteenth Smith, Elbridge. Norwich Free Academy, III, 208.
Ceutury. V. 65.

Smith, Goldwin. History, XVII. 119.
Rice, V. M. Schools of New York, II. 518.

Smith, H. B. The Dutch Universities, I. 387.
Richard, W.F. Methods in the National Schools of Smyth, Sidney. Objects of Education, XIII. 12.
England, X, 501-540.

Snell, E. S. The Gyroscope, II. 701.
Richards, Z. Djecipline, I. 107. The Teacher an Socrates, Cited, IV. 156; VIII. 77; X, 167, 187;
Artist, XIV. 69.

XI. 61, 62, 103, 107. Methods of Philosophy, X.
Richter, J. P. Cited, VIII, 27, 50, 618; X. 119- 375.
199.

South, R. Educational Views, XVII.
Rickoff, A. J. National Bureau of Education, XVI. Southey, Robert. The State and Education, XIII.
299.

719. Views of Home Education, XVI, 433. Con
Rider, Captain. On System of Navigation Schools, duct and Knowledge, XVI. 223.
XV. 67.

Spencer, Herbert. Thoughts on Education, XI, 485
Rosenkrantz. Present Age to the Educator, XII, 425. 512; XIII. 372-400.
Rosmini, A. Philosophy of Pedagogy, IV. 491. Spencer, J. C. Education of Teachers, XIII. 342

Training

Sprague, W. B. Influence of Yale College, X, 681. Wayland, Francis. Objects and Methods of Intelleet-
Spurzheim. Mutual Instruction, X, 611. Education ual Education, XIII. 801. Dedicatory Address at
defined, XIII. 11.

Pawtucket, VIII. 843. Educational Labors and
Stanley, Lord. Lyceums and Popular Edu., III. 241. Publications, XIII. 771. Extracts on Method of
Stephens, L. Normal Schools of Prussia, VIII, 368. Recitation-System of University Education-Sys-
Stewart, Dugald. Objects of Education, XIII. 13. tem of Public Schools for a City--The Library in
Stifler, Michael, and Algebraic Signs, XVI.

Popular Education–Theological Education-Moses
Stiles, W. H. Education in Georgia, II. 477.

Stuart-Dr. Nott-Thomas K. Arnold-XMI. 776.
Stow, David. Gallery Training Lessons, IX, 413. Webster, Noah. Schools as they were, XIII. 123.
Stowe, C. E. Life and Labors, V. 586. Educational Weld, Theodore D., and Manual Labor, XV. 234.

Wants of Ohio, V. 588. Primary Instruction in Wells, W. H. Life and Educational Labors, VIII.
Germany, VIII. 371. Teachers' Seminary, XV. 688. 529. Teachers' Conferences, XIII, 272. Teach-
Sturm, J. Life and Educational Labors, IV, 167, 401. ing English Grammar, XV. 241. Exercises on Re-
Sullivan, 0. Teaching the Alphabet, XII, 601. tiring from Chicago High School, XIV. 811.

Premiums for Knowledge in Com. Things, X. 93. Wessel, John. Educational Views, IV. 714.
Swett, John. Educational Labors, XVI. 625, 790. Whately, Archbishop. Annotations on Bacon, XIII.
Swift, J. On Manners, XVII.

103. Education defined, XI. 18.

Whewell, W. Education detined, XI, 11. School
Tafel, L. The Hamiltonian System, VI. 591.

Studies and University Examinations, XVII.
Tappan, H. P. Educational Development in Europe, White, E. E. National Bureau of Edu., XVI, 177.

I. 247-268. Educational Labors, XIII. 452. White, H. R. The Village Matron, III. 460.
Tarbox, I. N. Statistics of New England Colleges, White, S. H. National Bureau of Edu., XV. 180.

I. 405. American Education Society, XIV. 367. Wichern, T. H. Reformatory Education, III, 5, 603.
Tasso. Memoir and Educational Views, XVII. Wickersham, J. P. Education as an Element of Re-
Temple, F. Literature and Science, XVII.

construction of the Union, XVI. 83.
Tenney, Jonathan. Schools of New Hampshire, II. Wilbur, H. B. On Object Teaching, XV. 189.
511. Memoir, XVI. 761.

Wilderspin, S. Infant School, IX, 531 : XIII, 163.
Teutleben, K. von, and Society of Usefulness, XI. 424. Wiley, C. H. Schools of North Carolina, II. 527.
Thaer, August, and Gymnastics, VIII, 197.

Willard, Mrs. Emma. Female Education, VI. 125.
Thayer, G. F. Letters to a Young Teacher, I, 357; Female Association, XV. 612.

II. 103, 391, 657; III, 71, 313,; IV. 219, 450; VI. Willm, J. The Monitorial System, X. 466. Teach-

435; VIII, 81. Chauncey Hall School, XIII, 851. ers' Libraries, XIII. 293, 298.
Thayer, S. Competitive Exnmination, XV, 58. Wimmer, H. Public Instruction in Saxony, V. 350;
Thibaut. On Purity in Music, X. 635.

IX. 201. Educational Intelligence, III. 972; IV.
Thompson, A. Industrial School, III. 780.

243, 793. On Real Schools of Austria, III. 275.
Tice, J. H. Public Schools of St. Louis, I. 348. Winthrop, R. C. Free Schools, I. 645.
Tillinghast, Nicholas. As an Educator, II. 568. On Wise, Henry A. Schools of Virginia, II. 557.
Normal Schools, XVI. 453.

Wiseman, Cardinal. Education of the Poor, XVII.
Timbs, John. Endowed Schools of England, VIII. Wohlfarth, J. F. F. Pedagogical Treasure Casket,
201. The Hornbook, XII. 687.

VIII. 8-80; X, 116–290.
Tixier, J. School Dialogues, XVI. 445.

Woll, T. A. Educational Views, VI. 260.
Tobler, J. G. Methods of Teaching, V. 210.

Wolsey, Cardinal. Plan for Grammar School, VII. 487.
Town, Salem. Schools as they were. XIII. 737. Woodbridge, W. Suggestions on School Improve-
Trask, A. B. Town School of Dorchester, XVI, 105. ments, XV. 609. Reminiscences of Female Educa-
Trench, R. English Language, XVII.

tion prior to 1801, XVI. 137.
Trotzendorf, V. F. Educational Views, V, 107. Woodbridge, W. C. Life and Educational Labors,
Turk, R. C. W. von. V, 155.

V. 51. Education defined, XIII. 16.
Turner, Sydney. Reformatory Schools, III, 772. Woolsey, T. D. Historical Discourse on Yale fol
Tyndall. Study of Physics, XVII.

lege, V. 546. Norwich Free Academy, III. 197.

Wordsworth, W. State and Education. XIII. 719.
Vail, T. H. Methods of Using Books, II. 215. Wotton, Sir Henry. Survey of Educa., XV, 123-143.
Vassar, M. Plan of Vassar Female College, XI. 55.

Wyatt, Sir T.

On Conduct. XV, 376.
Vehrli. Hofwyl and Kruitzlingen, III. 389; X. 81. Wykeham, and Winchester College, VIII. 261.
Verplanck, J. C. Memoir of D. H. Barnes, XIV. 513.
Scientific knowledge and Business, V. 116.

Young, Samuel. Schools of New York, IX. 505.
Vinci, Leonardo di. Drawing, II. 425.

Young, T. U. Infant School Teaching, XII. 155.

Wadsworth, James. Labors of Education, V. 395. Zeller, C, H. Teachings of Experience for Christian
Watts, Isaac. Improvement of the Mind, II. 215. Schools, III. 386. Memoir, VII. 305.
Webster, Daniel. Normal Schools, I. 590. Free Zoroaster. Cited. X, 167.

Schools, I. 591. Education defined, XIII. 14. Zschokke. Cited, VIII. 21, 30, 51; X. 142-198.

III. STUDIES AND METHODS; SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND DISCIPLINE.
A B C-shooters, V. 90, G03; books, XII. 593. Boy-tutors, XVI. 227.
Absence. II. 444, 304; V. 631; XV. 293.

Burgher, or Citizens' School, VIII, 414; IX, 210,
Academy, plan for, XVI. 403.

384; XI, 248; XII. 520.
Accuracy, XIII. 575.

Benschenschuft, VII. 80, 91, 165.
Acquisition, XIII, 512.

Calisthenics, II, 405.
Acting plays, IV. 175; VII, 503; XIV. 474. Catechism on Methods, from Diesterweg. IV. 233, 505.
Aetivity, independent, VIII. 617; XIII, 13, 376. Catechetical Method, W. Ross, IX, 367.
Adult education, I. 634; VIII. 230; XVI. 343. Character, X. 129; XIII, 571.
Advice to Students on Studies and Conduct, XIII. Chemistry, V. 712; VII. 277 VIII. 665; XI. 210;

193; XV. 377; XVI. 186, 216, 9:43. Lord Bacon, XIII. 391.
XVI. 186; Sir Thomas Bodleigh, XV, 381; Lord Childhood, IV. 424; V, 467; VII. 382; XI. 483 ;
Brougham, XVI. 186; Carlyle, XVI. 191; Sir XII. 629; XVI. 193. .
Matthew Hale, XVII; Niebuhr, XVI. 216; Sir Chiding, XIII, 559.
H. Sidney, XV. 379; Southey, XVI. 233; Vail, Church-cross-row, XVII, 195.

II. 215; Whately, XIII, 106; Wyatt, XV. 377. Christianity in Schools, I. 251; II, 567, 693; IV.
Algebra, II. 177.

527, 572; V. 77 ; XIII. 118, 287, 325.
Alphabet, Modes of Teaching. XII. 593.

Christmas Festival, X. 260; XIII. 95.
Amusements, III. 42; V. 419; X. 256 ; XIII. 93; Chronological Method, IV, 515.
XIV. 474.

City Influence, III, 323. VII. 33, 240; VIII, 143;
Analysis and Analytic Method, II, 122, 133; IV. XV. 309.
505 ; VIII. 169; IX. 205.

Classical Instruction, by dscham, XI. 70; I. Cady,
Anger, XI, 189, 504.

XII. 561; David Cole, I. 67: Erasmus, IV. 729;
Aoglo-Saxop Lauguage, I, 33; XVI. 568.

T. Lewis, I. 285; Raumer, VII. 471; Sturin, IV.
Anthropology, XIII, 327.

169; Woolsey, VII, 487.
Apborisms on Studies and Conduct, XV. 376; Sub- Collective Teaching, X. 395.
jects of Instruction, X, 141; Discipline X, 187; Common Things, by Lord Ashburton, I. 629; Morri-
Early Training, XIII. 79.

son, IX, 321; Stow, IX. 413; Specimen Lessons,
Appetites, X. 137; XIII. 512, 578; XVI, 53.

X, 105, 575; IX. 349.
Aptness to teach, XIII, 762.

Competitive Examination, by Barnard, XIV. 108;
Archery, III. 41; XVI. 496.

Booth, III. 267.
Architectural Game, XI. 27.

Common Sense, V. 476; XIII, 599.
Arithmetic, Currie, IX, 247; Hill. VI. 454; Gilles- Composition, III. 331; VIII. 387; X. 415; XI.

pie, I. 539; Raumer, VIII, 170; Richards, X. 534. 122 ; XII. 494; XIV. 363; XVI. 641.
Art-as a Study, by Miss A. M. Dwight, II. 409, 587; Compulsion in attendance, XI. 266; in study, VII.
II. 167; IV. 191; V. 305.

213; XIII. 373.
Art and Science, by Dana, II. 349; Raumer, X. 218. Conduct, IV, 161; X. 141; XIII. 79; XV, 123,
Attendance, Barnard, XV. 293.

378; XVI, 191.
Ball-frame, IX, 255; XI. 24.

Conversation, XI. 106, 339; XIII, 556; XIV, 360;
Basedow's Methods, V, 487.

XV. 152; XVI. 682.
Beans in Arithmetic, VI, 454.

Conversntional Method, by Marcel, XI. 106, 339.
Beating of Children, IV. 156, 165; V. 509; XI. 479. Constructive Method, by Abbenrode, IV, 507.
Bible, II. 613; Arnold, IV. 443; Locke, XII, 471; Corporal Punishment, Bell, X. 486; Diesterweg,

XIV, 308; Luther, IV, 443; Raumer, VII, 402; XIII, 69; Erasmus, XVI. 680; Goldsmith,
VIIL 104; Whately, XIII. 108.

XIII, 352; Johnson, XIII. 363; Locke, XIII.
Bifurcation, XII, 47.

563; Austria, XVI. 614, 690 ; England, III. 157.
Biographical Method in History, IV. 514, 577. Country Trnining, III, 323: V, 472; X, 644; XIII.
Biology, XIII. 392.

141; XV. 303.
Bipartite Organization, XII, 150.

Counters, VIII, 182
Birch, III. 462 ; V, 503.

Courage, IX. 41; X. 57; XIII. 584; XVI. 57.
Blackboard or surface, V. 499; X, 600; XII. 648; Crime and Education, IV. 579; VI, 311, 494 ; XI.
XIII. 32

77.
B'ocks in Geometry, VI. 451.

Curiosity, II. 118; V. 477; XIII, 112, 572.
Books, Value of, II. 205, 215; X, 158; XIII. 788; Debating, by J. M. Elligott, I. 495.
XVI. 191.

Discipline, by Diesterweg, VIII, 619; Locke, XIII.
Book-learning, II. 561; VII, 27, 366; XIII. 837. 557; Hamill, I. 122; Spencer, XI. 498; Thayer,
Borough-rond School Methods, X. 38).

VI. 435; XIII. 831; Dorchester School in 1645,
Botany, VII. 296 ; VIII. 126; IX, 77, 109; X, 640; XVI, 106; Hopkins Grammar School, 1684, IV.710.
XI. 46.

Drawing, by Hentschel, X. 59; Ravaison, II, 419.

English Language and Literature, by Buckham, Johnson, XII, 363; Masson, IV. 271; Raumer,

XIV. 343; XVI. 556; Day, XVI. 641; Gibbs, VII, 201, 213; Vaughn, IV, 271; Wolf, VII. 487.
II. 193; III. 101; Hart, I. 33 ; Felton, X. 284; Liberal Education and Studies, Bates, XV, 155; Ev-
March, XVI, 562; Wells, XV. 145.

erett, VIII, 364; Felton, X. 281.
Fagging in English Schools, IV, 569 ; V. 80; XV. 107. Madras System, X. 467.
French Language, XV. 772.

Manners, Hopkins, XI. 930; Locke, VI. 213; XII.
German Language, XI. 155, 400; XII. 460.

551 ; Montaigne, IV, 469; Thayer, II. 103; Plu-
Geography—Methods of Teuching, by Abbenrode, tarch, XI, 106.

IV, 505; Currie, IX. 269; Dunn, X. 421 ; Hill, Mathematics, French Polytechnic system, I, 533.
VII. 275 ; Key, IX. 186 ; Mann, VIII, 390; Mar- Memory. II. 385; IV, 171, 201, 721; V. 678; VI.
cel, XI. 35 ; Pestalozzi, X. 150 ; Phelps, IX. 62; 464, 602; VII, 279; X. 126; XII, 416; XIV.
Raumer, VIII. 3; Thayer, VIII, 81.

87, 321, 469; XVII. 230.
Geometry, Basedow, V, 512; Diesterweg, IV. 239; Mental Arithmetic, II. 301; VIII. 385, 459.

Euclid. VIII, 155; Gillespie, I. 541 ; Hill, VI. 191, Mental Science, by J. Haven, III, 125.

449; Raumer, VIII. 155.; Spencer, XIII. 383. Methods, Essays on, by Currie, IX. 229: Diesterweg,
Geology. IV. 785; VI. 238; VII, 71, 203 ; VIII. IV. 233, 505; Dunn, X. 391; Morrison, IX, 294 ;
241; XI. 46.

Raumer, VIII. 101; Richards, X. 505 ; Ross, IX.
Gradation of Schools. II. 455.

367; Spencer, XIII. 372; Thayer, III. 313; IV.
Greek Language, XII, 561; I. 284, 482.

219, 450.
Grouping Method in History, IV. 515.

Military Exercises in School, by Molineux, XI. 513.
Gymnastics, Lewis' System, XI. 531; XII, 665. Monitorial System, English National Schools, X. 503 ;
History, Method in, by Abbenrode, IV, 512; XII. Irish National Schools. XIII. 150.

665; Arnold, IV. 565; Basedow, V. 503; Hill, Moral Education, Brooks, I. 336; Cowdery, XVI.
VI. 184; VII. 490; Marcel, XI. 41; Niemeyer, 323; Fellenberg, III, 595; Lalor, XVI, 48; Locke,
X. 156; Raumer, VIII. 101 ; X. 641 ; Richter, XI. 473; XIII. 548; Russell, IX. 19; Spencer,
X. 154 ; Whately, XIII. 119.

XI. 496.
Intellectual Training, by Eliot, XVI. 488; Fellen- Music, or Singing, VIII. 633; IX. 267; XVI. 38.

berg, III, 594; Goldsmith, XIII. 347; Hill, VI. Mutual Instruction, Bell, X. 491; De Gerando, &.
180 ; Krüsi, V. 187; Laior, XVI. 40; Locke, 465; Fowle, X, 611; Keenan, X, 462; Lancaster,
XIV, 305 ; Milton, II. 79; Montaigne, IV. 161; X. 402.
Pestalozzi, VII. 512; Quintilian, XI. 3 ; Raumer, Mother Tongue, III. 327; IV, 473; V. 235, 246, 253 ;
VIII. 81; Rousseau, V. 459 ; Russell, II. 112: VI. 197, 201; VII, 375; XI. 458; XII. 464;
Spencer, XI, 484: XIII, 372; Wayland, XIII. XIV. 343; XVI. 340.
801.

Motives to Study, Lyton, III, 295; Mann, XIII. 518;
Infant Schools and Instruction, Currie, IX. 228; XVI. 279; Rousseau, V. 477; Spencer, XIII.

Froebel, II, 449; IV. 237; Home and Colonial So- 377; Thnyer, VI. 435.
ciety, XIII. 78; Marcel, XI. 21; Prussian Natural Science, IV. 445; VIII, 123; X, 145; XV.
Schools, VIII, 371; Raumer, VII. 381; Young, 95; XVI. 528.
XIV, 165.

Number, Early Sessions In, II, 132; V. 188; VII.
Intuitional Instruction, IV, 233; XII. 411.

698; IX. 247, 467; XI. 24.
Italian Language, VII, 434, 459.

Natural History, Dawson, III. 428.
Itinernting Schools, VIII. 296.

Nntural Consequences of Actions, the Law of Disci-
Jesuit System of Schools, V. 212; XIV, 455.

pline, Spencer, XI. 498.
Kindergarten, IV, 257.

New Gymnastics, XI, 531; XII. 665.
Lacedamonian System, III. 85; XIV. 612.

Object Teaching, Bacon, V. 674, 680; Calkins. XII.
Lancasterian System, X. 402.

633; Comenius, V, 180; Holm, V, 696; Hecker,
Latin Language, by Acquaviva, XIV. 462; Arnold, V. 693, 696; Henzky, V. 694; Hoole, XII, 647;

IV, 564 ; Asham, XI. 70; Bates, XV, 155; Co- Gesner, V. 748; Greene, X. 245; Locke, VI. 220;
menius, VI, 585; Erasmus, IV, 729; Gesner, V. Marcel, XI. 21; Oswego System, XII. 604; XIV.
744 ; VI. 583; Hamilton, VI, 586; Herder, VI. 93; Pestalozzi, V. 76; Ratich, V. 689; Semler,
207; Hoole, XVII. 2:25; Jacotot, VI. 595; Ja- V, 691; Sheldon, XIV, 93; Spencer, XIII, 378;
cobs, VI. 612; Locke, XIV. 311; Luther, IV. 44; Wilbur, XV, 189.
Melancthon, IV, 755, 764; Meierotto, VI, 583, 609; Oral Teaching, Barnard, V. 777; Currie, IV. 104;
Meiring, VI. 592; Milton, II. 79: Montaigne, IV. Masson, V. 270; Marcel, XI. 31, 330; Morrison,
473; VI. 584 ; Ratich, V, 234; VI, 586 ; Raumer, IX, 303, 321; Wolf. VI. 272; Vaugh, IV. 271.
VI, 581; VII. 471; Rousseau, V. 473; Ruthardt, Penmanship, Everett, IV. 452; XII, 556; Mulhau-
VI. 600; Sturm, IV. 169; VI. 581; Tafel, VI. sen, X. 524; Niebuhr, XVI. 207; Raumer, X.
591 ; Textor, XV. 444 : Trapp, VI. 261 ; Vossius, 626; Thayer, IV. 450.

VI. 582; Wolf VI. 268 ; Woolsey, VII, 487. Perception and Perceptive Faculties, Bacon, XII, 42;
Latin Pronunciation. XV. 171.

Hill, XIV, 86; Marcel, XI. 21; Raumer, VIII.
Lectures and University Teaching, Barnard, V. 775; 207; Russell, II. 113, 316; Spencer, XIII. 396.

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