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sistant Professors—younger, or less accomplished teachers, employed in subdepartments, or to aid in departments in which the work cannot be fully done by one man. 3d. Lecturers, or non-resident Professors—men eminent in some speciality of art or science, who may be employed to visit the University at specified seasons, and give courses of lectures. 4th. Tutors, or young men employed temporarily to give instruction in the more elementary studies.

The committee indicate the following as among the more important departments or chairs of instruction :

1. The Professorship of Practical and Theoretical Agriculture. 2.

of Horticulture. 3.

of Analytical and Practical Mechanics. 4.

of Military Tactics and Engineering. 5.

of Civil Engineering. 6.

of Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 7.

of Zoology and Animal Physiology. 8.

of Mathematics. 9.

of Chemistry. 10.

of Geology, Mineralogy, and Physical Geography. 11.

of English Language and Literature. 12.

of Modern Languages. i3.

of Ancient Languages. 14.

of History and Social Science. 15.

of Mental and Moral Philosophy. In addition to these, the committee suggest the following Lectureships : 1. The Lectureship of Veterinary Science. 2.

of Commercial Science. 3.

of Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygienė. 4.

of Constitutional, Commercial, and Rural Law.

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MILITARY DEPARTMENT.

The Military Department will be made an important and efficient part of the University, and the plan reported by Major J. H. Whittlesey of the United States Army, for providing a system of National military education, will be acsepted, when offered, in all its details. Drill exercises will be introduced from the outset, and a uniform of Cadet gray will be worn by all the students after the opening of the next autumn term.

THE LABOR SYSTEM.

All students, unless excused on account of sickness or physical inability, will be required to join in the work of the farm, and the garden, of fruit growing and animal husbandry, for from two to three hours per day, for which compensation will be made.

BOARD, TUITION, ETC. Students can obtain rooms in the order of application, in the University buildings, at $4 per term, or in private families. Meals are furnished at cost.

Each student pays a matriculation fee of $10, and, if from Illinois, $5 per term; if from out of the State, $20 a year.

The formal opening will be on the 11th of March, 1868.

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MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.

THE STATE AND EDUCATION.

THE RIGHT AND DUTY OF THE STATE TO ESTABLISH, AID, AND

SUPERVISE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

THE STATE AND EDUCATION,

AND SYSTEMS OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION.

..., 320

PRELIMIXARY REPORT.

PAGE. Circular of Commissioner Education,...

311 National Education at Home and Abroad,...

311 THE STATE AND EDUCATION, First Article,....

313 Address to the People of New Jersey-Bishop Loane, ...

313 American Authorities-Penn, Washington, John Adams, Jefferson, Madison,

Rush, Jay, De Witt Clinton, Kent, J. Q. Adams, Everett, Cushing, Bushnell, Maon,... 321 THE STATE AND EDUCATION, Second Article,...

313 THE AMERICAN DOCTRINE OF TAXATION FOR PUBLIC SCHOOLS,..

323 Report to the Legislature of the State of New York-Barnard,

324 Early Practice of New England - Mano, Webster,..

327 Colony of Massachusetts, 1647,... Colony of Connecticut, 1650,

323 Colony of New Haven, 1655,

328 Colony of Plymouth, 1659,.

329 THE STATE AND EDUCATION, Third Article...

331 English Authorities, Macaulay, Carlyle, Broughnm, Smith, Mill...

331 French Authorities-Montesquieu, Guizot,...

336 Public INSTRUCTION IN THE CANTON OF ZURICH,..

337 Territory, Population, Government,.......

337 School Organization, Compulsory Attendance,.

339 1. Prinary Schools,..

341 Elementary, Real Schools, Repetition Schools,.

343 Seminary for Teachers of Primary Schools,

345 Tenchers' Certificate, Chopters, Synod, ...

346 Annual Meeting of the Cantonal Synod,...

347 Sources of School revenue,......

348 2. Secondary Schools......

351 Aims, and Completeness of their Annunl Courses,..

352 City Schools of Zurich and Winterthur,..

353 3. Superior and Professional Schools,

354 Cantonal Schools,

354 Teachers' Seminary,....

355 Gymnusium-Upper and Lower....

357 School of Industry-Upper and Lower,...

358 Veterinary School,

358 Agricultural School,...

359 4. The University of Zurich,..

360 Private Schools,

360 Federal Polytechnic School,....

360 NORMAL SCHOOL AT KUSSNACHT,

361 COURSES OF LECTURES IN UNIVERSITY, 1866-67,

366

I. THE STATE AND EDUCATION.

AN ADDRESS TO THE PEOPLE OF NEW JERSEY IN 1838.*

Fellow CITIZENS :—We were appointed by the Convention of pour own delegates to address you on the subject of Common Shools. We approach you with solicitude, as deeply sensible of the great importance of the interest intrusted to us; yet, as freemey speaking to freemen, with prevailing confidence.

The points which we propose for your attention, and, if we migit, would press into every heart, are few, simple and practical; the lecessary consequences, it seems to us, from principles which all adnit. We say that knowledge is the universal right of man: and w need bring no clearer demonstration than that intellectual nature, apable of it, thirsting for it, expanding and aspiring with it, which · God's own argument in every living soul. We say that the assetion for himself of this inherent right, to the full measure of his abities and opportunities, is the universal duty of man: and that whover fails of it, thwarts the design of his Creator; and, in proportior as he neglects the gift of God, dwarfs and enslaves and brutifies th high capacity for truth and liberty which he inherits. And all exprience, and every page of history confirm the assertion, in the close kitred, which has everywhere been proved, of ignorance and vice wito wretchedness and slavery. And we say farther, that the security & this inherent right to every individual, and its extension, in theullest measure, to the greatest number, is the universal interest of san; so that they who deny or abridge it to their fellows, or whoencourage, or, from want of proper influence, permit them to negect it, are undermining the foundations of government, weakening the hold of society, and preparing the way for that unsettling all dissolving of all human institutions, which must result in anarchy ad ruin, and in which they who have the greatest stake must be th greatest sufferers. A lesson, clearly taught by

* The Convention assemed in Trenton on the 27th and 20th of January, 1833, Chief Jus tice Hornblower presiding The address was prepared by the Rt. Rev. George W. Doane, in behalf of a Committee nsisting of Bishop Doane, Chairman, L. Q. C. Elmer, M. J Rhees, T. Frelinghuysen, S. Green, D. B. Ryall, A. B. Dod, A. Atwood, and S. R.

Gummere.

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