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THE SEA.

THE FOREST.

AGRICULTURE.

Summary Statement

Spirits from grain, beer, ale, and
porter....:

128,330
Of the value of the exports of the growth, produce, and

Snuff and tobacco

813,671
manufacture of the United States, during the year com-

Lead......

39,687
mencing on the 1st day of October, 1839, and ending Linseed oil

, and spirits of turpentine 63,348
on the 30th day of September, 1840.

Cordage......

43,510

Iron-pig, bar, and nails..... 147,397
Fisheries-

Castings..

115,664
All manufactures of..

841,394
Dried fish, or cod fisheries ... $541,053
Pickled fish, or river fisheries,

Spirits from molasses

283,707
(herring, shad, salmon and

Sugar, refined..

1,214,658
179,106
mackerel)....

Chocolate

2,048
Whale and other fish oil ... 1,404,984

Gunpowder..

117,347
430,490
Sperinaceti oil

86,954

Copper and brass.
Whalebone...

310,379
Medicinal drugs..

122,387
332,353

$5,279,317
Spermaceti candles,

$3,198,370 Cotton piece goods-
Printed and colored..

$398,977
White ......

2,925,257
Skins and surs...
$1,237,789 Nankeens.

1,200
Ginseng.....

22,728 Twist, yarn, and thread.. 31,445
Products of wood-

All other manufactures of 192,728
Staves, shingles, boards, hewn
timber ...
$1,801,049

$3,549,607
Other lumber..

270,933

Flax and hemp—
Masts and spars.

29,049
Cloth and thread..

7,114
Oak bark, and other dye. 229,510

Bags and manufactures of . 1,128
All manufactures of wood... 596,305

Wearing apparel.

152,055
Naval stores, tar, pitch, rosin,

Combs and buttons

40,299
and turpentine....

602,529
Brushes ....

12,263
Ashes, pot and pearl.

533,193
Billiard tables and apparatus

2,471
4,062,568 Umbrellas and parasols.

9,654
Leather and morocco skins not sold
$5,323,085
per pound ....

19,557
Printing presses and type...

17,105
Fire engines and apparatus

6,317
Product of animals-

Musical instruments....

12,199
Beef, tallow, hides, horned

Books and maps. .

29,632
cattle....

$623,373
Paper and stationery

76,957
Butter and cheese..

210,749
Paints and varnish.

34,631
Pork, (pickled,) bacon, lard,

Vinegar .....

6,401
live hogs...

1,894,894
Earthen and stone ware .

10,959
Horses and mules

246,320
Manufactures of glass..

56,688
Sheep......
30,698

Tin..

7,501
$3,006,034

Pewter and lead. 15,296
Vegetable food-

Marble and stone 35,794
Wbeat...
$1,635,483

Gold and silver,
Flour..
10,143,615

and gold leaf.. 1,965
Indian corn.

338,333
Gold and silver coin.....

2,235,073
Indian meal

705,183
Artificial flowers and jewellery

9,479
Rye meal...

170,931
Molasses

9,775
Rye, oats, and other small

Trunks...

6,607
grain and pulse....

113,393
Brick and lime..

16,949
Biscuit, or ship-bread.. 428,988

Domestic salt

42,246
Potatoes
54,524

6,425,722
Apples...

55,131

Articles not enumerated-
Rice....
1,942,076

Manufactured.......

403.496
15,587,657
Other articles

740,305

1,143,801
$18,593.691
Tobacco....
9,883,957 TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

113,895,634
Cotton ...

63,870,307

Register's Office, June 8, 1841.
All other agricultural products —
Flaxseed...
$120,000

T. L. SMITH, Register.
Hops .....

11,235

45,940
Indigo ...,

209

Another Anthracite Furnace.
$177,384 The Crane Iron Company have commenced the erection

of another Anthracite Furnace in the vicinity of their pre-
MANOYACTURER.

sent works on the Lehigh, near Allentown. The new fur-
Soap, and tallow candles,

$451,995

nace will be completed by about the middle of November,
Leather, boots and shoes

214,360

next. We are gratified to learn that the success of the fur:
Household furniture

295,844

nace erected last year, has proved so satisfactory that the
Coaches and other carriages

74,416

proprietors have determined to increase their operations.
Hats.

103,398

Every enterprise of this kind will aid in bringing into ope-
Saddlery

59,517

ration two of the greatest staples of Pennsylvania, Coal and
Wax., ....

$59,685

Iron,-Philadelphia Commercial List.

Brown sugar

BY JOEL MUXSELL.

Chronology and Statistics of Tobacco. masters. Europeans likewise already smoked it. We also

find from a passage in Cartier's Voyage, that it was used

in Canada.* The whole world, within the space of about three centu In 1559, tobacco was introduced into Europe from St. ries, have become chewers, smokers and snuffers. The Chi. Domingo, by a Spanish gentleman named Hernandez de neso chews and smokes his opium, the East-Indian bis betel, Toledo, who brought a small quantity into Spain and Porand the European and American their tobacco. Against tugal. In the same year Jean Nicot, envoy from the court these practices it is useless to declaim. It was in vain that of France to Portugal, first transmitted thence to Paris, io the Parliament of England discouraged the flagrant delit' Queen Catharine de Medicis, seeds of the tobacco plant; and of smoking ; in vain did James I. assure his subjects that the from this circumstance it acquired the name of Nicotiana. custom was “ loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harm- When tobacco began to be used in France, it was called ful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs and in the black herbe du grand prieure, from the grand prieure of the house stinking fume thereof, nearest resembling the horrible Sty of Lorraine, who was then very fond of it. It was also called gian smoke of the pit that is bottomless." The strong arm herbe de St. Croix, after Cardinal Prosper St. Croix, who, of the law opposed it; the priest and the physician, the mo on his return from Portugal, where he had been nuncio from ralist and the philanthropist arrayed themselves against it; the Pope, introduced the custom of using tobacco. It was all to no purpose. Opposition only served to make proses received at once in France and the Papal Slates with great lytes, and the custom has spread far and wide under perse enthusiasm, in the form of powder, or snuff; it was somecution, till over the whole surface of the globe its fumes arise time after this period, that smoking became popular. constantly to the atmosphere, and it is at this moment, per In 1565, Conrad Gesner became acquainted with tobacco. haps, the most general luxury in existence. In the city of At that time several botanists cultivated it in their gardens. New York alone, the consumption of cigars is computed at The same year Sir John Hawkins carried tobacco from ten thousand dollars a day-a sum greater than that which Florida to England, where “all men wondered what it its inhabitants pay for their daily bread; and in the whole meant." country the annual consumption of tobacco is estimated at In 1570, they smoked in Holland out of conical tubes one hundred million pounds, being seven pounds to every composed of palm leaves, plaited together. man, woman and child, at an annual cost to the consumer, In 1575, first appeared a figure of the plant in Andre of twenty millions of dollars !

Thevot's Cosmographie. It may be curious to mark by what gradations the use of In 1585, the English first saw pipes made of clay among tobacco has reached this grand crisis. The subject attracted the natives of Virginia, which had just been discovered by the attention of Prof. Beckmann of Gottingen, about the Sir Richard Grenville. It appears likewise that the English middle of the last century, who took great pains to ascertain soon after fabricated the first clay tobacco pipes in Europe. the dates of its introduction into the different countries of In 1590, Schah Abbas of Persia, prohibited the use of toEurope, and from whose work some of the following items bacco in his empire; but the practice had become so deepare gathered. He conjectures that even before the discovery rooted among his subjects, that many of them fled to the of the fourth quarter of the globe, a sort of tobacco was mountains, and abandoned everything else to enjoy the lux. smoked in Asia ; and this opinion was also entertained by ury of smoking. the celebrated traveller, M. Pallas, who says that, “ Among In the beginning of the seventeenth century they began the Chinese, and among the Mogol tribes who had the most to cultivate tobacco in the East Indies. intercourse with them, the custom of smoking is so general, In 1604, James I. of England endeavored by means of so frequent, and become so indispensable a luxury; the to- heavy imposts, to abolish the use of tobacco, which he held bacco purse affixed to their belt so necessary an article of to be a noxious weed. dress; the form of the pipes, from which the Dutch seem to In 1610, the smoking of tobacco was known at Constan. have taken the model of their's as original; and, lastly, the tinople. To render the custom ridiculous, a Turk, who bad preparation of the yellow leaves, which are merely rubbed to been found smoking, was conducted about the streets, with pieces and then put into the pipe, so peculiar, that we can a pipe transfixed through his nose. For a long time after, not possibly derive all this by the way of Europe from Ame- the Turks purchased tobacco from the English, and that the rica, especially as India, where the habit of smoking tobacco refuse. It was late before they began to cultivate the plant is not so general, intervenes between Persia and China.” It themselves. may be too late now to investigate the subject, even if it In 1615, tobacco began to be sown about Amersfort, in should be considered worth the trouble. But there is one Holland, which afterwards became famous for its cultivation. more important confirmation of Prof. Beckmann's conjec. In 1616, the colonists began to cultivate tobacco in Virture to be adduced from Ulloa's Voyage to America, who ginia. It is not known whether the plant was indigenous, says: “It is not probable that the Europeans learned the or whether it came from a more southern country. It is supuse of tobacco from America ; for as it is very ancient in the posed the seeds were from Tobago. But it seems to have eastern countries, it is natural to suppose that the knowledge been in use among the Virginia Indians at the time they of it came to Europe from those regions by means of the in- were visited by the English, and was called by them petun, tercourse carried on with them by the commercial states on or petum. Clavigero says, “ tobacco is a name taken from the Mediterranean Sea. Nowhere, not even in those parts the Haitine language.” Humboldt also derives it from the of America where the tobacco grows wild, is the use of it, same language, and says that the term was used to desigand that only for smoking, either general, or very frequent.” nate the pipe, or instrument made use of by the natives in We have nothing, however, authentic, earlier than the fol- smoking the herb, which the Spaniards transferred to the lowing:

herb itself, and after them, the other nations of the old world. In 1496, Romanus Paine, a Spanish monk, whom Colum In 1619, James I. wrote his Counterblast to Tobacco, bus, on his second departure from America had left in that and ordered that no planter in Virginia should cultivate country, published the first account of tobacco, with which he became acquainted in St. Domingo. He gave it the name “ There groweth a certain kind of herbe, whereof in of cohoba, cohabba, gioia.

summer they make great provision for all the yeere, and only In 1519, tobacco is said to have been discovered by the the men use of it; and first they cause it to be dried in the Spaniards near Tobasco, though it is assigned to the next sunne, then weare it about their neckes, wrapped in a little year. *

beastes skinne made like a little bagge, with a hollow peece In 1535, the negroes had already habituated themselves of stone or wood like a pipe ; then when they please they to the use of it, and cultivated it on the plantations of their make poudre of it, and then put in one of the ends of the

said cornet or pipe, and laying a coal of fire upon it, at the *“ Cette plante, (tabac,) acre et caustique, trouvee in other end sucke so long, that they fill their bodies full of 1520, pres de Tobasco dans le golfe du Mexique."--Precis smoke, till that it cometh out of their mouth and nostrils, sur l'Amerique, p. 116.

even as out of the tonnell of a chimney."

more than one hundred pounds a year. He also prohibited In 1724, Pope Benedict XIV. revoked the Bull of excomits sale in England or Ireland until the custom should be munication published by Innocent, because he had acquired paid and the royal seal affixed. Twenty thousand poundle the habit of taking snufl. were exported this year from Virginia to England, the whole In 1732, tobacco was made a legal tender in Maryland, crop of the preceding year.

at one penny a pound. In 1620, ninety young women were sent over from Eng. In 1747, and the two years previous, there were annually land to America and sold to the planters for tobacco, at one exported to England from the American colonies, 40,000,hundred and twenty pounds each. The price at first was 000 pounds of tobacco, 7,000,000 of which was consumed one hundred pounds, which gradually increased to one hun. in England. The annual revenue was about $4,500,000. dred and fifty pounds. King James issued a proclamation In 1753, the King of Portugal farmed out the tobacco restraining the disorderly trade in this obnoxious article. In trade for about $2,500,000. The revenue of the King of the same year some English companies introduced the Spain from tobacco, amounted to $6,330,000. smoking of tobacco into Zittau, in Germany, and Robert In 1759, the duties on tobacco in Denmark, brought in Konigsman, a merchant, brought the tobacco plant from $40,000. England to Strasburg.

In 1770, the Empress of Austria received a revenue from In 1622, the annual import of tobacco into England from tobacco of $300,000. America, for the last seven years, was 142,085 pounds. In 1773, the duties on tobacco in the two Sicilies, amount

In 1624, the Pope published a decree of excommunica- ed to $446,000. tion against all who should take snuff in the church, because In 1775, the annual export of tobacco from the Uniteil then already some Spanish ecclesiastics used it during the States, for the last four years, was one million pounds ; for celebration of mass. King James restricted the culture of the last thirty years it averaged 40,000,000 pounds, of which tobacco to Virginia and the Somer isles, and forbade its im- 7,000,000 were consumed in Great Britain, and 33,000,000 portation from any other quarter, considering England and in the other European countries. Wales “as utterly unfyt in respect of the clymate, to cherish In 1780, the King of France received from tobacco a rethe same for any medicinall use, which is the only good to venue of about $7,250,000. be approved in yt."

In 1782, the annual export of tobacco during the precedIn 1631, smoking of tobacco was introduced into Misnia, ing seven years' war of the Revolution, had been 12.378,504 by some Swedish troops.

pounds. Of the total seven years' exportation, 33,974,949 In 1634, a tribunal, called the chamber of tobacco, was pounds were captured by the British. formed at Moscow, which prohibited smoking under pain of In 1787, the quantity imported into Ireland was 1,877,having the nose slit; and the Grand Duke defended the en. 579 ; in 1829, 4,124,742 pounds. trance of tobacco with the infliction of the knout for the first In 1789, the quantity exported from the United States, offence, and death for the second.

together with the two previous years, averaged about 90,In 1639, the grand assembly of Virginia passed a law that 000,000 pounds. all tobacco planted in that and the two succeeding years, In 1820, the quantity of tobacco grown in France had should be destroyed, except such a proportion to each plan doubled in three years, being 32,887,500 pounds. ter as should make in the whole 120,000 pounds, and that In 1828, the revenue on tobacco in the State of Maryland the creditors of the planters should receive 40 pounds for was $27,275. every 100 pounds due them.

In 1830, the revenue on tobacco and snuff in Great Bri. In 1653, smoking began in the canton of Apenzell, in Swit- tain was nearly $13,000,000. zerland. At first the children ran after those who smoked In 1834, the value of tobacco used in the United States, in the streets. They were likewise cited before the council was estimated at $16,000,000; of which $9,000,000 were and punished, and the inn-keepers were ordered to inform supposed to have been for smoking Spanish cigars ; $6,500,against such as should smoke in their houses.

000 for smoking American tobacco and chewing; and $500,In 1661, the police regulation of Berne, in Switzerland,000 for snuff. was made, which was divided according to the ten command

In 1838, the annual consumption of tobacco in the United ments. In it, the prohibition to smoke tobacco, stands under States was estimated at one hundred million pounds, valued the rubric, “thou shalt not commit adultery," and was con.

at twenty million dollars cost to the consumers, being seven tinued in force until the middle of the last century. pounds to each individual of the whole population. In 1669, the crimes of adultery and fornication, were

In 1840, it was ascertained by a committee appointed to punished in Virginia by a fine of from 500 to 1000 pounds of tobacco.

procure and report statistical information on the subject, that In 1670, and the two following years, smoking of tobacco about one million five hundred thousand persons were enwas punished in the canton of Glaurus, by a fine of one gaged in the manufacture and cultivation of tobacco in the cro-vn Swiss money.

United States; one million of whom were in the States of In 1676, the whole custom on tobacco from Virginia, col- Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri. Allowing the lected in England, was $600,000. In the same year two population of the whole country to be seventeen millions, it Jews first attempted the cultivation of tobacco in the mar. in the cultivation or manufacture of this article. The value

will be seen that nearly one-tenth are in some way engaged gravate of Brandenburg; but which, however, was not brought of the export during that year was nearly $10,000,000. to bear till 1681. In 1689, Jacob Francis Vicarius, an Austrian physician,

(Northern Light. invented the tubes for tobacco pipes, which have capsules

Albany, September, 1841. containing bits of sponge; however, about the year 1670, already pipes were used having glass globules appended to them, to collect the oily moisture exuding from the tobacco.

Efect of Enterprise. In 1690, Pope Innocent XII. excommunicated all who should be guilty of taking snuff or tobacco in the church of The Directors of the Great Western Railroad made a reSt. Peter at Rome.

port to the Legislature of Massachusetts last winter, in which In 1697, great quantities of tobacco already were produced they gave encouragement that this stupendous work would in the palatinate of Hesse.

be finished to the State line, thirty miles from the Hudson In 1709, the yearly exports of tobacco from America for river, during the nonth of May, 1842. Last Saturday week the last ten years, were 28,858,666 pounds; of which 11,- the work was completed, and for the first time the cars ran 260,659 pounds were annually consumed in Great Britain, direct from Boston to the Hudson river, a distance of about and 17,598.007 pounds in the countries of Europe, 160 miles! This has been accomplished eight months in

In 1719, the Senate of Strasburg prohibited the culture of advance of the time stipulated, a circumstance without a tobacco from an apprehension that it would diminish the parallel in the history of railroads, and will cause a saving growing of corn,

J of about $200,000 to the stockholders.--North American,

253

Steamship Clarion and Anthracito Coals.

Revolutionary Reminiscence. This packet ship, provided, as our readers are aware, with

It has been stated in several of the papers that Mr. Squiers, an auxiliary steam power and the Erricson Propeller, made of Ashford, Connecticut, who died a few weeks since, was a trial excursion in the Bay last Saturday, the result of which the last of the survivors of the battle of Bunker Hill. This may be considered of sonic importance in connexion with is not correct. Philip Bagley, Esq. of this town, now eightythe progress of American steain navigation.

six years of age, and enjoying a healthful old age, in the full It has long been urged by grave authorities, that nature has interposed an effectual barrier to prevent the United possession of all his faculties, was in that battle.' Being in States fro:n competing with Great Britain in steam naviga- which we have thrown together for the benefit of those of

our office the other day, we procured from him some facts tion, owing to the scarcity and inferior quality of our bituminous coals. The absurdity of this opinion was strikingly of the times of devoted and unselfish patriotism.

our readers who love to indulge in these old reminiscences illustrated in the trial alluded to.

Mr. Bagley was a private soldier in Capt. Sawyer's comThe public generally are not aware that the Clarion's boilers have been constructed for burning anthracite coals pany, and Col. Frye's regiment of Massachusetts minute only, and that artificial draught is employed in order to dismen, having enlisted in this regiment, in December 1774.pense with the usual tall and cumbrous smoke-pipe. Hith- 19th of April and arrived at Cambridge, at 10 o'clock the

He left Haverhill, on the Merrimack, at 1 o'clock on the erto some difficulty has been experienced in keeping up a sufficient supply of steam in the Clarion;" but by the ad- until the evening, of the 16th of June. On that evening,

next day. Nothing worthy of notice, he says, transpired dition of a small steam cylinder for working the blower ap. Col. Frye's regiment, together with Col. Dodge's of Conplied to the boiler, this difficulty has now been most com. pletely removed, and nothing could be more perfect than the necticut, crossed the neck, and went on to Bunker Hill

, control which the engineer had over the steam during the where the British troops had previously halted on their retrial. By simply turning a stop-cock attached to the small treat from Concord, in April. “After remaining there about cylinder, the quantity and pressure of the steam in the boil- an hour, both regiments proceeded to Breed's Hill. Here

they commenced breaking grounds for their entrenchments, ers were raised at pleasure.

Considering the small quantity of stowage room required between 10 and 11. o'clock at night, working all night Ro by anthracite coals

, its cleanliness, powerful heating quali- secretly and silently that the Glasgow sloop of war, lying in ties, and the perfect absence of smoke, we hazard nothing in the river at a short distance, did not discover them. At day asserting, after what we witnessed on board the “ Clarion," light they were discovered and a fire was opened upon them that so far from the United States laboring under any disau- from Copp's Hill and from the shipping. T'he Glasgow soon

hauled up the stream, in order to rake the Neck with her vantage respecting coals for steam navigation, we possess, shot, and prevent reinforcements from reaching the bill.in our inexhau-tible stores of anthracite coals, an absolute Notwithstanding the shot and shells continued to pour in advantage over our transatlantic neighbors. And in warfare upon them, the Americans continued to work upon their enwe have an advantage of the most vital importance. Steamers burning bituminous coal can be tracked” at trenchments

, and but one man was killed by the cannonade. sea at least seventy miles before their hulls become visible Sentries were stationed to watch the flash from the gun, and by the dense columns of black smoke pouring out of their on their calling out “ shot !" the men would lie down flat tale of their whereabouts, which is not the case with those when the Americans were compelled to leave the spade and pipes, and trailing along the horizon. It is a complete tell- upon the ground, and then rise and resume their work. This

continued until the British troops landed at Charlestown, burning anthracite coal, as the latter kind sends forth no smoke. Therefore all steamers like the “ Clarion” and pick-axe, and resort to their guns. The first division of the “Kamschatka,” are decidedly superior to all others in time British troops, on landing, halted till the second had crossed of war. And we regret very much that our two new war der cover of the fire from Copp's Hill, and from the sloop of

the river, when both formed, and advanced up the hill, unsteamers, the “ Missouri” and “ Mississippi," have been

war and the gun boats. constructed to burn foreign bituminous coals only! We re

As is well known to every reader, the Americans reserved gret very much that the “ Board of Construction” kad so little foresight. But this en passant.

their fire, until the British were within a hundred yards, Having had the advantage of conversing with some twice repulsed them, and it was not until the third rally that

when they opened so deadly a fire upon them, that they thorough-bred engineers who were on board the Clarion, we cannot avoid noticing the performance of the propeller dur- the British succeeded in surrounding the lines, so as to rake ing the trial. The speed of the engine being accurately tried, the

breast work, and compel the Americans to retreat. it was found to give 4,700 revolutions to the propeller in

Fisty years after this memorable battle, Mr. Bagley was running over a space of 14 miles. Now, the propeller being at the laying of the corner stone of the Monument, and on

present, with Lafayette, and other survivors of the revolution, 64 feet in diameter ; and its spiral plates being set at an an- the 10th of September, 1840, he was there again at the Great gle of 46 degrees at the circumference, its progressive move

Whig Convention, in the full vigor of manhood, and he ment through the water will be precisely 20 feet for each revolution ; had therefore the resistance of the water been per mental pile.—Newburyport Herald.

hopes yet to live to see the top stone laid upon the monu. fect, the vessel could only have passed over a space of 95,900 feet. But 14 miles is equal to 73,900—thus it will be seen that

Gold Mines in Georgia. only 2-9ths was lost by slip on the receding of the water We have been favored by a friend with the following exa remarkable fact, considering the large midship section of tract of the letter received a day or two since, from a gentlethe “ Clarion,” compared with the small dimension of the man of high respectability residing in the Cherokee Country. propeller.

Sixes, we are informed, is an old Indian town, where several Respecting the consumption of fuel in the “ Clarion,” it lots of land were found to have very rich surface, deposit and has now been fully ascertained 320 pounds per hour is the vein mines of gold. Some four years since we understand average, which is less than that required by a British steamer 12,000 was taken from a branch on its margin, and many of forty horse power.-New York Herald,

other lots near by were found to be valuable.

[Savannah Repub. Oldest Man in New England. Deacon John Whitman was born in Bridgewater, March

Hickony Flats, Cher. Co.? 25, 1735, and entered upon his one hundred and seventh

October 1, 1841. S year last Friday, (March 26th.) His bodily health is good, The gold mine of Gerald's continues to be pretty good ; and he is able to walk out without a cane. His mental fac- they have taken some 800 dwts. from it, one piece weighing ulties have failed him, and he has lost his eye-sight. He 18 dwts. About the Sixes they continue to take it with great has been a temperate man all his life; not having tasted ar- success—three hands frequently make from 50 to 100 dwts. dent spirits for the last fifty years.

in a day.

more than one hundred pounds a year. He also prohibited In 1724, Pope Benedict XIV. revoked the Bull of excomits sale in England or Ireland until the custom should be munication published by Innocent, because he had acquired paid and the royal seal affixed. Twenty thousand pounds the habit of taking snuff. were exported this year from Virginia to England, the whole In 1732, tobacco was made a legal tender in Maryland, crop of the preceding year.

at one penny a pound. In 1620, ninety young women were sent over from Eng. In 1747, and the two years previous, there were annually land to America and sold to the planters for tobacco, at one exported to England from the American colonies, 40,000,hundred and twenty pounds each. The price at first was 000 pounds of tobacco, 7,000,000 of which was consumed one hundred pounds, which gradually increased to one hun- in England. The annual revenue was about $4,500,000. dred and fitty pounds. King James issued a proclamation In 1753, the King of Portugal farmed out the tobacco restraining the disorderly trade in this obnoxious article. In trade for about $2,500,000. The revenue of the King of the same year some English companies introduced the Spain from tobacco, amounted to $6,330,000. smoking of tobacco into Zittau, in Germany, and Robert In 1759, the duties on tobacco in Denmark, brought in Konigsman, a merchant, brought the tobacco plant from $40,000. England to Strasburg.

In 1770, the Empress of Austria received a revenue from In 1622, the annual import of tobacco into England from tobacco of $300,000. America, for the last seven years, was 142,085 pounds. In 1773, the duties on tobacco in the two Sicilies, amount

In 1624, the Pope published a decree of excommunica ed to $446,000. tion against all who should take snuff in the church, because In 1775, the annual export of tobacco from the Uniteil then already some Spanish ecclesiasties used it during the States, for the last four years, was one million pounds ; for celebration of mass. King James restricted the culture of the last thirty years it averaged 40,000,000 pounds, of which tobacco to Virginia and the Somer isles, and forbade its im- 7,000,000 were consumed in Great Britain, and 33,000,000 portation from any other quarter, considering England and in the other European countries. Wales “as utterly unfyt in respect of the clymate, to cherish In 1780, the King of France received from tobacco a rethe same for any medicinall use, which is the only good to venue of about $7,250,000. be approved in yt."

In 1782, the annual export of tobacco during the precedIn 1631, smoking of tobacco was introduced into Misnia, ing seven years' war of the Revolution, had been 12.378,504 by some Swedish troops.

pounds. Of the total seven years' exportation, 33,974,949 In 1634, a tribunal, called the chamber of tobacco, was pounds were captured by the British. formed at Moscow, which prohibited smoking under pain of In 1787, the quantity imported into Ireland was 1,877,having the nose slit; and the Grand Duke defended the en. 579; in 1829, 4,124,742 pounds, trance of tobacco with the infliction of the knout for the first In 1789, the quantity exported from the United States, offence, and death for the second.

together with the two previous years, averaged about 90,In 1639, the grand assembly of Virginia passed a law that 000,000 pounds. all tobacco planted in that and the two succeeding years, In 1820, the quantity of tobacco grown in France had should be destroyed, except such a proportion to each plan- doubled in three years, being 32,887,500 pounds. ter as should make in the whole 120,000 pounds, and that In 1828, the revenue on tobacco in the State of Maryland the creditors of the planters should receive 40 pounds for was $27,275. every 100 pounds due them.

In 1830, the revenue on tobacco and snuff in Great BriIn 1653, smoking began in the canton of A penzell, in Swit- tain was nearly $13,000,000. zerland. At first the children ran after those who smoked In 1834, the value of tobacco used in the United States, in the streets. They were likewise cited before the council was estimated at $16,000,000; of which $9,000,000 were and punished, and the inn-keepers were ordered to inform supposed to have been for smoking Spanish cigars ; $6,500,against such as should smoke in their houses.

000 for smoking American tobacco and chewing; and $500,In 1661, the police regulation of Berne, in Switzerland, 000 for snuff. was made, which was divided according to the ten commandments. In it, the prohibition to smoke tobacco, stands under States was estimated at one hundred million pounds, valued

In 1838, the annual consumption of tobacco in the United the rubric, “thou shalt not commit adultery,and was con

at twenty million dollars cost to the consumers, being seven tinued in force until the middle of the last century.

pounds to each individual of the whole population. In 1669, the crimes of adultery and fornication, were punished in Virginia by a fine of from 500 to 1000 pounds

In 1840, it was ascertained by a committee appointed to of tobacco.

procure and report statistical information on the subject, that In 1670, and the two following years, smoking of tobacco about one million five hundred thousand persons were enwas punished in the canton of Glaurus, by a fine of one gaged in the manufacture and cultivation of tobacco in the crown Swiss money.

United States; one million of whom were in the States of In 1676, the whole custom on tobacco from Virginia, col- Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri. Allowing the lected in England, was $600,000. In the same year two population of the whole country to be seventeen millions, it Jews first attempted the cultivation of tobacco in the mar

will be seen that nearly one-tenth are in some way engaged gravate of Brandenburg; but wbich, however, was not brought in the cultivation or manufacture of this article. The value to bear till 1681.

of the export during that year was nearly $10,000,000. In 1689, Jacob Francis Vicarius, an Austrian physician,

(Northern Light. invented the tubes for tobacco pipes, which have capsules

Albany, September, 1841. containing bits of sponge; however, about the year 1670, already pipes were used having glass globules appended to them, to collect the oily moisture exuding from the tobacco.

Effect of Enterprise. In 1690, Pope Innocent XII. excommunicated all who should be guilty of taking snuff or tobacco in the church of The Directors of the Great Western Railroad made a reSt. Peter at Rome.

port to the Legislature of Massachusetts last winter, in which In 1697, great qu tities of tobacco already were produced they gave encouragement that this stupendous work would in the palatinate of Hesse.

be finished to the State line, thirty miles from the Hudson In 1709, the yearly exports of tobacco from America for river, during the nonth of May, 1842. Last Saturday week the last ten years, were 29,858,666 pounds; of which 11,- the work was completed, and for the first time the cars ran 260,659 pounds were annually consumed in Great Britain, direct from Boston to the Hudson river, a distance of about and 17,598.007 pounds in the countries of Europe, 160 miles! This has been accomplished eight months in

In 1719, the Senate of Strasburg prohibited the culture of advance of the time stipulated, a circumstance without a tobacco from an apprehension that it would diminish the parallel in the history of railroads, and will cause a saving growing of corn,

of about $200,000 to the stockholders.-North American.

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