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THE BILL H. R. 9051, TO REDUCE TAXATION AND
SIMPLIFY THE LAWS IN RELATION TO THE

COLLECTION OF THE REVENUE.

IN FOUR PARTS.

PART IV.

WASHINGTON:
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,

1888.

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TARIFF STATEMENTS.

2109

2,0,0.10/28/

No. 1.--CHAIR CANE.

STATEMENT OF CHICAGO RATTAN AND REED COMPANY.

CHICAGO, January 5, 1889. DEAR SIR: We desire to call your attention to the fact that we are manufacturers of chair cane and reeds, and that in the manufacture of these goods we annually consume a large quantity of rattan and em. ploy a large number of bands. Since the act of 1883 chair cane ayd reeds have paid an ad valorem duty of but 10 per cent., whereas it was formerly 25 per cent. We are thus without any adequate protection and desire a specific duty, as since 1883 we have been subjected to a constantly increasing competition from German and Chinese sources, which is having a serious effect on our business.

Our case was recently presented before the Senate Finance Committee by Messrs. Cowperth wait and Lang, of the Union Rattan Manufactnring Company of New York, and the Wakefield Rattan Company, respectively, and we now earnestly beg you will personally intercede with the committee, to the end that their recommendations as to a specific duty may be favorably reported.

Rattans are now free, which is right, being raw material. We desire a duty of 5 cents per pound on reeds and $15 per bale of 100,000 feet on chair cane, both of which are products of rattan, in order that we may be adequately protected.

By reference to our argument, presented before the committee, we feel sure you will become convinced of the justice of our cause.

The opposition encountered at the bearing was confined, so we are informed, to a party representing German manufacturers and Chinese importers, whose interests are of course identical, and to Governor Gear, of Iowa, who numbers among his constituents the Fort Madison Chair Company of that State, who are contractors for the convict labor in the peuitentiary located at that point. We are menaced by heavy and increasing importations from Germany and China, which will greatly contract the output of our home manufacturers and reduce number of hands employed. Very respectfully,

CHICAGO RATTAN AND REED COMPANY. Hon. C. B. FARWELL,

Washington, D. C.

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STATEMENT OF MONTGOMERY FORD, MANUFACTURER OF UM

BRELLA AND PARASOL STICKS.

JANUARY 1, 1889. DEAR SIR: At the suggestion of Hon. Charles O'Neill, member of Congress, Philadelphia, I take the liberty of addressing you regarding the duty on parasol and umbrella sticks, finished, which are now 30 per cent., while the best grades umbrellas (silk umbrellas) are 50 per cent. There are quantities of umbrella and parasol sticks imported (linished) and all for the better grades, or rather for the best grades of parasols and umbrellas; and we feel that, as the difference is caused by the higher wages we pay, we should have at least an equal protection with the high-grade umbrella. As it is now. we can not compete in finer grades on account of wages, and the only remedy is to either reduce the wages or have more protection. More fine sticks and handles are imported every year, and the stick manufacturers bere are getting down to the cheap and common grades made of native woods, and the business has become notoriously unprofitable; in fact, not worth carrying onthe employés and the parties who furnish the material getting pretty near the whole of the proceeds. We do not see how wages.can be reduced reasonably, and therefore do not feel that the protection asked for is an undue one.

An umbrella maker, recently returned from abroad, made the remark that if the trade knew what they could do on the other side there would be still more imported. Will you kindly consider this, and if this can be amended, give any suggestions as to how to present it. I am, very truly,

MONTGOMERY FORD. Hon. WILLIAM ALLISON,

United States Senate, Washington, D.O.

PEARL BUTTONS.

STATEMENT OF NEWELL BROS. MANUFACTURING COMPANY.

NEW YORK, December 26, 1888. DEAR SIR: A letter has been written to you by Mr. C. L. Woodbridge, a large importer of pearl buttons in this city, in which he mentions our name as being the chief movers in the matter of advancing the tariff on pearl buttons. In answer, would say Mr. Woodbridge is entirely mistaken. We are not tie chief wovers; in fact, although we are manufacturers of pearl buttons, have had nothing to do in the matter at all; have not been to Washington; are in sympathy with the other manufacturers, but knew nothing about their bili until we saw it in print. Some time ago one of the large importers stated to us that he was importing large quantities of pearl buttons made from convict labor; at the present time could not get them, but no doubt others are getting them all the time. If necessary we can give you the name of this importer, but would prefer not to do so, as he is one of our customers.

The statement that only one hundred and fifty men and perhaps two or three hundred girls, all told, comprise the pearl-button industry in this country, we believe to be untrue; the industry is much larger. But probably no other industry in the country has been brought so low as this one, and no more melancholy statement could be made than this one of Mr. Woodbridge's, and no better argument for protecting the pearl-button industry could be made. Yours, truly,

NEWELL BROS. MANUFACTURING COMPANY,

A. W. NEWELL, Manager. Hon. WILLIAM B. ALLISON.

NEW YORK, December 27, 1888. DEAR SIR: In addition to previous letter, would say we employ some ten to fifteen hands in this branch of business. Have made nothing out of it, and can not, because they can be imported cheaper than we can make them. We got into the business by buying out a company who sunk every cent of their capital (some $15,000), solely because they could not compete with foreign manufacturers. If there is any industry needing protection, it is this. We have no hesitation in saying that fifteen thousand to twenty thousand people could be given employment in this business, with proper protection. We sincerely hope those who are endeavoring to restore an industry which was once of quite large proportions will meet with success, and that you will not be influenced against the pearl-button manufacturers by anything which the importers of these goods and agents of foreign manufacturers may say or do. Very truly, yours,

NEWELL BROS. MANUFACTURING COMPANY.
A. W. NEWELL,

Hon. WILLIAM B. ALLISON.

FUR HATS.

STATEMENT OF HAT MANUFACTURERS.

To the Senate Committee on Finance :

The undersigned, representing the entire fur.hat manufacturing in. dustry of the United States, and being a committee appointed for the purpose of presenting the interests of that industry to your cominittee, would respectfully submit that, instead of a 50 per cent. ad valorem duty on fur hats, they desire, in addition to the present ad valorem duty of 30 per cent., a specific duty, so that the clause will read as follows:

" Hats, for men's, women's, and children's wear, composed of the fur of the rabbit, beaver, or other animals, or of which such fur is the chief component of value, wholly or partially manufactured, valued at not exceeding $5 per dozen, $1.50 per dozen; valued at more than $5 and not exceeding $10 per dozen, $3 per dozen; valued at more than $10

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