Measure What Matters to Customers: Using Key Predictive Indicators (KPIs)

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John Wiley & Sons, 2007 M01 29 - 188 páginas
Measure What Matters to Customers reveals how to capitalize on Key Predictive Indicators (KPIs), the innovative measures that define the success of your enterprise as your customers do. If you want to increase your company's profits by working smarter, this is the book for you.

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Contenido

CHAPTER 1 THE CANARY IN THE COAL MINE
1
CHAPTER 2 THE ECONOMY OF MIND
5
CHAPTER 3 THE OLD BUSINESS EQUATION
11
CHAPTER 4 THE NEW BUSINESS EQUATION
15
CHAPTER 5 PANTOMETRISTS COUNTING FOR THE SAKE OF COUNTING
25
CHAPTER 6 THE GOSPEL OF EFFICIENCY
33
CHAPTER 7 ALL LEARNING STARTS WITH THEORY
45
CHAPTER 8 CONSTRUCTING A THEORY
53
CHAPTER 11 DEVELOPING KPIS FOR YOUR COMPANY
83
CHAPTER 12 INCREASING KNOWLEDGE WORKER EFFECTIVENESS
95
CHAPTER 13 MANAGING BY RESULTS VERSUS MANAGING BY MEANS
113
CHAPTER 14 HUMAN CAPITAL NOT CATTLE
127
CHAPTER 15 THE MORAL HAZARDS OF MEASUREMENTS
139
CHAPTER 16 THE DREAMERS VERSUS THE PANTOMETRISTS
157
BIBLIOGRAPHY
163
SUGGESTED READING
171

CHAPTER 9 PANTOMETRY VERSUS THEORY
61
CHAPTER 10 MEASURES THAT MATTER
69

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Página 34 - I have seen a small manufactory of this kind where ten men only were employed, and where some of them consequently performed two or three distinct operations. But though they were very poor, and therefore but indifferently accommodated with the necessary machinery, they could, when they exerted themselves, make among them about twelve pounds of pins in a day.
Página 25 - I often say that when you can measure what you are speaking about and express it in numbers you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind: it may be the beginning of knowledge, but you have scarcely, in your thoughts, advanced to the stage of science, whatever the matter may be.
Página 34 - One man draws out the wire, another straights it, a third cuts it, a fourth points it, a fifth grinds it at the top for receiving the head; to make the head requires two or three distinct operations; to put it on is a peculiar business; to whiten the pins is another; it is even a trade by itself to put them into the paper; and the important business of making a pin is, in this manner, divided into about eighteen distinct operations, which in some manufactories are all performed by distinct hands...
Página 147 - Too large a proportion of recent "mathematical" economics are mere concoctions, as imprecise as the initial assumptions they rest on, which allow the author to lose sight of the complexities and interdependencies of the real world in a maze of pretentious and unhelpful symbols.
Página 34 - Those ten persons, therefore, could make among them upwards of fortyeight thousand pins in a day. Each person, therefore, making a tenth part of forty-eight thousand pins, might be considered as making four thousand eight hundred pins in a day. But if they had all wrought separately and independently, and without any of them having been educated to this peculiar business, they certainly could not each of them have made twenty, perhaps not one pin in a day...
Página 41 - Remember, that time is money. He that can earn ten shillings a day by his labour, and goes abroad, or sits idle, one half of that day, though he spends but sixpence during his diversion or idleness, ought not to reckon that the only expense; he has really spent, or rather thrown away, five shillings besides.
Página 38 - The work of every workman is fully planned out by the management at least one day hi advance, and each man receives in most cases complete written instructions, describing in detail the task which he is to accomplish, as well as the means to be used in doing the work.
Página 38 - ... the workman who is best suited to actually doing the work is incapable of fully understanding this science, without the guidance and help of those who are working with him or over him, either through lack of education or through insufficient mental capacity.
Página 121 - Our policy is to reduce the price, extend the operations, and improve the article.
Página xvii - The last phase is that just as you are about to be reconciled to your servitude, you kill the monster, and fling him to the public.

Acerca del autor (2007)

RONALD J. BAKER, CPA, is the author of The Firm of the Future and Pricing on Purpose, both from Wiley, and Professional's Guide to Value Pricing, Sixth Edition. He is founder of VeraSage Institute, a think tank dedicated to teaching value pricing to professionals around the world. Baker is a frequent speaker and consultant to professional service firms on implementing Total Quality Service and Value Pricing. He has been appointed to the AICPA's Group of One Hundred, a think tank of leaders addressing the future of the CPA profession, and was named to Accounting Today's 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 Top 100 Most Influential People in the profession.

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