Like a Waking Dream: The Autobiography of Geshe Lhundub Sopa

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Simon and Schuster, Nov 20, 2012 - 349 páginas
Among the generation of elder Tibetan lamas who brought Tibetan Buddhism west in the latter half of the twentieth century, perhaps none has had a greater impact on the academic study of Buddhism than Geshe Lhundub Sopa. He has striven to preserve Tibetan religious culture through tireless work as a professor and religious figure, establishing a functioning Buddhist monastery in the West, organizing the Dalai Lama's visits to the U.S., and offering countless teachings across the country. But prior to his thirty-year career in the first ever academic Buddhist studies program in the United States - a position in which he oversaw the training of many among the seminal generation of American Buddhist studies scholars - Geshe Sopa was the son of peasant farmers, a novice monk in a rural monastery, a virtuoso scholar-monk at one of the prestigious central monasteries in Lhasa, and a survivor of the Tibetan uprising and perilous flight into exile in 1959.

In Like a Waking Dream, Geshe Sopa frankly and observantly reflects on how his life in Tibet - a monastic life of yogic simplicity - shaped and prepared him for the unexpected. His is a tale of an exemplary life dedicated to learning, spiritual cultivation, and the service of others from one of the greatest living masters of Tibetan Buddhism.
 

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Contenido

A Brief History of Tibet
1
1 Life in Tsang
13
2 Early Memories
20
3 The History of Ganden Chönkhor
27
4 The Beginning of My Life as a Monk
32
5 My Relative the Ritual Specialist
36
6 Living the Religious Life at Ganden Chönkhor
40
7 A Young Monks First Two Teachers
44
40 The Reting Affair and Other Troubles
161
41 Being Named Tutor
171
42 Finding Time for Practice
174
43 Phabongkha Rinpoché and His Legacy
178
44 Teachings from Other Great Lamas
183
45 Vajrayoginī Retreat at Phabongkha Labrang
187
46 What I Gained and Lost in Becoming a Tutor
191
47 The Dalai Lama Takes Power and the First Exile
193

8 Daily Assemblies and Classes
46
9 Running Away from the Monastery
49
10 Completing Ones Basic Education
52
11 My Uncle and His Position in the Monastery
55
12 Sustenance in the Monastery
58
13 The Structure and Schedule of Education at Ganden Chönkhor
62
14 The System of Philosophical Education
65
15 The Status of Scholar Monks
69
16 The Education of Scholar Monks
71
17 My Teacher Gen Mönlam
74
18 Taking the Kālacakra Empowerment the First Time
76
19 Deciding to Go to Sera
79
20 Getting My Parents Permission
84
21 The Journey to Sera
86
22 History of Sera Monastery
90
23 Entry into Tsangpa Regional House and Sera Jé
93
24 Tri Rinpoché
96
25 Geshé Losang Chönden
99
26 Geshé Ngawang Riksal
102
27 Geshé Ngawang Gendün
104
28 Gen Lhündrup Thapkhé and the Pure Monastic Life
106
29 The Monastic Way of Life
109
30 The Disciplinarians Lecture
116
31 The Curriculum of Education at Sera Jé
122
32 Studying and Teaching at Sera Jé
124
33 The Structure of Debates at Sera
128
34 The Jang Winter Session
135
35 The Honor of Being Named Rikchung
138
36 The Higher Honor of Being Named Rikchen
143
37 The Different Grades of the Geshé Degree
148
38 The Conferring of the Geshé Degree
151
39 Gyümé and Gyütö Tantric Colleges
158
48 Gen Lhündrup Thapkhé Is Appointed Abbot of Sera Jé
197
49 A Gradual Transformation
199
50 The Tenth Panchen Lama
203
51 Debating the Dalai Lama
205
52 The Tibetan Uprising of 1959
209
53 Deciding to Leave Sera
215
54 The Beginning of the Exile
218
55 A Brief Respite and the Long Journey out of Tibet
222
56 Arriving in India
229
57 Beginning Life as a Refugee
233
58 From Assam to Dalhousie
239
59 Learning to Live in Exile
244
60 Trying to Keep Tibetan Culture Alive
248
61 An Attempted Trip to Bhutan
251
62 A Letter from His Holiness
255
63 The Situation for Those Who Did Not Escape Tibet
259
64 Going to America
261
65 Our New Life in New Jersey
266
66 Beginning to Teach in America
270
67 Starting a Dharma Center
275
68 His Holiness the Dalai Lamas First Visit to Madison
279
69 The First Kālacakra Empowerment in America
281
70 My Return to Tibet
287
71 Meeting the Panchen Lama and the Passing of Gen Thapkhé Rinpoché
290
72 The Recent Past
295
73 The Future
303
Table of Tibetan Spellings
307
Notes
319
Glossary
325
Select Bibliography
333
Index
339
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Born in the Tsang region of Tibet in 1923, Geshe Lhundub Sopa is both a spiritual master and a respected academic. He rose from a humble background to complete his geshe studies at Sera Je Monastic University in Lhasa with highest honors and was privileged to serve as a debate opponent for the Dalai Lama's own geshe examination in 1959. He moved to New Jersey in the United States in 1963 and in 1967 began teaching in the Buddhist Studies Program at University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he is now professor emeritus. In 1975, he founded the Deer Park Buddhist Center in Oregon, Wisconsin, site of the Dalai Lama's first Kalachakra initiation granted in the West. He is the author of several books in English, including the five-volume comprehensive teaching, Steps on the Path to Englightenment.

In 1989, Paul Donnelly entered the PhD program in Buddhist Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He earned his doctorate in 1997 and is now an associate professor and director of the Religious Studies program at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff.

Tenzin Gyatso, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, is the spiritual leader of the Tibetan people. He frequently describes himself as a simple Buddhist monk. Born in northeastern Tibet in 1935, he was as a toddler recognized as the incarnation of the Thirteenth Dalai Lama and brought to Tibet's capital, Lhasa. In 1950, Mao Zedong's Communist forces made their first incursions into eastern Tibet, shortly after which the young Dalai Lama assumed the political leadership of his country. He passed his scholastic examinations with honors at the Great Prayer Festival in Lhasa in 1959, the same year Chinese forces occupied the city, forcing His Holiness to escape to India. There he set up the Tibetan government-in-exile in Dharamsala, working to secure the welfare of the more than 100,000 Tibetan exiles and prevent the destruction of Tibetan culture. In his capacity as a spiritual and political leader, he has traveled to more than sixty-two countries on six continents and met with presidents, popes, and leading scientists to foster dialogue and create a better world. In recognition of his tireless work for the nonviolent liberation of Tibet, the Dalai Lama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989. In 2012, he relinquished political authority in his exile government and turned it over to democratically elected representatives.

His Holiness frequently states that his life is guided by three major commitments: the promotion of basic human values or secular ethics in the interest of human happiness, the fostering of interreligious harmony, and securing the welfare of the Tibetan people, focusing on the survival of their identity, culture, and religion. As a superior scholar trained in the classical texts of the Nalanda tradition of Indian Buddhism, he is able to distill the central tenets of Buddhist philosophy in clear and inspiring language, his gift for pedagogy imbued with his infectious joy. Connecting scientists with Buddhist scholars, he helps unite contemplative and modern modes of investigation, bringing ancient tools and insights to bear on the acute problems facing the contemporary world. His efforts to foster dialogue among leaders of the world's faiths envision a future where people of different beliefs can share the planet in harmony. Wisdom Publications is proud to be the premier publisher of the Dalai Lama's more serious and in-depth works.

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