Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

POLITICAL SCIENCE IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE,

POLITICAL SCIENCE

AND

COMPARATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

VOLUME I

SOVEREIGNTY AND LIBERTY

BY

JOHN W. BURGESS, Ph.D., LL.D.

PROFESSOR OF History, PoliticAL SCIENCE AND INTERNATIONAL LAW,
DEAN OF THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE,

IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE

Boston, U.S.A., AND LONDON
PUBLISHED BY GINN & COMPANY

ENTERED AT STATIONERS' HALL.

COPYRIGHT, 1890,
BY JOHN W. BURGESS.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

TYPOGRAPHY BY J. S. CUSHING & Co., Boston, U.S.A.

PRESSWORK BY GINN & Co., BOSTON, U.S.A.

JC 213 B.is yol

TO

the memory of my former friend and teacher,

Prof. Dr. Johann Gustav Droysen,

these volumes, as the first-fruits of a work begun many years ago under his guidance, are reverently and

affectionately inscribed.

PREFACE.

When, a score of years ago, I first read Hegel's Philosophie der Geschichte, I resolved that, should I ever write a book, I would dispense with an introduction. I shall now keep, substantially, that self-made promise; and yet I feel myself necessitated to preface my work with a few words, in order that I may briefly explain to the public why I presume to ask its indulgent attention to another treatise upon an old subject, and in order that I may make due acknowledgment of my gratitude to two friends, who have rendered me invaluable service in the preparation of these volumes.

I believe it was Goethe who said that men should live before they write. It is, indeed, a serious thing to ask the world to read a book. It should never be done, unless the book answers a purpose not fulfilled, or not so well fulfilled, by some book already existing. The publication of a new book in the domain of Political Science is never justifiable unless it contains new facts ; or a more rational interpretation, or a more scientific arrangement, of facts already known; or a new theory.

It is this consideration which has caused me to hesitate long before offering this work to the public, - so long that I have sometimes feared it would share the fate of Mr. Casaubon's Key. I cannot claim that it contains any facts before unknown. I believe that I advance, in some cases, a different interpretation of facts, and a different conclusion from facts, than have been, heretofore, presented. Whether that inter

« AnteriorContinuar »