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UTICA TRUST
& DEPOSIT COMPANY

Open Monday
Evenings until

8 o'clock

GENESEE & LAFAYETTE STS.
EAST SIDE BRANCH BLEECKER & ALBANY STS.

UTICA, NEW YORK

The Real Estate Title Insurance and

Trust Company of Philadelphia

523 CHESTNUT STREET

BROAD STREET OFFICE
Across from Independence Hall

45 S. BROAD ST. (Lincoln Building)
THE OLDEST TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY IN THE WORLD

Capital, Surplus and Profits $4,900,000.00 Incorporated in 1876, this Company has issued over 273,000 policies of title insurance and has accumulated information which enables it to

execute work with unequaled accuracy and promptness. Esecutes trusts of every description. Become security for persons acting in fiduciary capacities. Londo money on installment and term mortgages.

Receives money on deposit and allows interest. Rento safes in its burglar proof vaults. Buys and sella real estate and assumes the management thereof.

OFFICERS

FRANCIS A. LEWIS, President
DANIEL HOUSEMAN,

CHARLES S. KING,
Vice-President and Treasurer

Secretary and Assistant Treasurer A. KING DICKSON,

JEREMIAH N. ALEXANDER,
Vice-President and Trust Officer

Assistant Secretary
JAMES R. WILSON

JOHN H. FAIRLAMB
Vice-President

Assistant Treasurer

DIRECTORS WILLIAM H. SHELMERDINB

FRANK H. MOSS

HENRY M. DU BOIS HOWARD A. STEVENSON

CHARLES T. QUIN

FRANCIS A. LEWIS CHARLES W. WELSH

CHARLES E. HEED

OWEN J. ROBERTS WILLIAM WOOD

JOHN A. RIGG

GEORGE McCALL SAMUEL M. PREEMAN

WALTER A. RIGG

ISAAC W. ROBERTS • Member of the Philadelphia Clearing House Association

REPRINTED IN TAIWAN

FRANK L. BABBOTT
WALTER ST. J. BENEDICT
GEORGE M. BOARDMAN
SAMUEL W. BooCOCK
WILLIAM N. DYKMAN
JOHN H. EMANUEL, JR.
MARTIN E. GOETZINGER
FRANCIS L. HINE

TRUSTEES
DAVID H. LANMAN

ROBERT L. PIERREPOXT
DAVID G. LEGGET

HAROLD I. PRATT
JOSIAH O. Low

CLINTON L. ROSSITER
FRANK LYMAN

FRANK D. TUTTLE HOWARD W. MAXWELL J. H. WALBRIDGE EDWIN P. MAYNARD ALEXANDER M. WHITE J. ADOLPH MOLLENHAUER WILLIS D. WOOD FRANK C. MUNSON

OFFICERS

EDWIN P. MAYNARD, President
DAVID H. LANMAN, Vice-President

GILBERT H. THIRKIELD, Asst. Secretary
FRANK J. W. DILLER, Vice-President FREDERICK B. LINDSAY, Asst. Secretary
WILLIS MCDONALD, JR., Vice-President CHARLES B. ROYCE, Asst. Secretary
FREDERICK T. ALDRIDGE, Vice-President EDMUND N. SCHMIDT, Asst. Secretary
WILLARD P. SCHENCK, Secretary

BENJAMIN G. WESTCOTT, Asst. Secretary HORACE W. FARRELL, Asst. Secretary CHARLES A. COLE, Asst. Secretary HERBERT U. SILLECK, Asst. Secretary FREDERIC R. CORTIS, Auditor

Capital, $1,500,000.00
Surplus and Undivided Profits, $3,021,994.32

BROOKLYN TRUST COMPANY

Main Office: 177 Montague Street

Brooklyn

Four Convenient Offices Bedford Office: Bay Ridge Office: 1205 Fulton Street

7428 5th Avenue at Bedford Ave.

at 75th St.

Manhattan Office:

90 Broadway
at Wall St.

Lawyers Title & Trust Company

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS

$9,000,000 Member of The New York Clearing House Association 160 Broadway, New York

44 Court St., Brooklyn RECEIVES DEPOSITS subject to check or on certificate, allowing interest thereon.

Depository for moneys paid into Court and for money of bankrupt estates.
LENDS ON APPROVED STOCKS and Corporation Bonds as collateral.
ACTS AS TRUSTEE, Guardian, Executor, Administrator, Assignee, or Receiver,

Transfer Agent or Registrar of Stocks of Corporations. Takes Charge of Personal
Securities.

OFFICERS

EDWIN W. COGGESHALL, Chairman of the Board LOUIS V. BRIGHT, President

WALTER N. VAIL, Secretary and Treasurer THORWALD STALLKNECHT, Vice-President

JOSEPH P. STAIR, Assistant Vice-President HERBERT E. JACKSON, Vice-Pres. & Gen. Mgr. GEORGE F. PARMELEE, Assistant Vice-President LEWIS H. LOSEE, Vice-President

MARSHALL E. MUNROE, Assistant Treasurer ARCHIBALD FORBES, Vice-President

JOHN A. STOEHR. Assistant Secretary ROBERT I. SMYTH, Vice-President

HENRY C. MERSEREAU, Assistant Secretary WILLIAM F. BAECK, Vice-President.

WALTER H. GRIEF. Auditor WILLIAM K. SWARTZ, Vice-President

WILBUR C. WITHERSTINE, Mgr. Jamaica Office

DIRECTORS
De Witt Bailey
William P. Dixon
Philip Lehman

William Schramm
Lucius H. Beers
Richard T. Greene
Payson Merrill

Thorwald Stallknecht
Louis V. Bright
August Heckscher
Charles F. Boyes

William Ives Washburn George F. Butterworth Herbert E. Jackson

Edgar J.
Phillips

John J. Watson, Jit
William M. Calder
Edwin C. Jameson
Dick S. Ramsay

Albert H. Wiggin Edwin W. Coggeshall J. Frederic Kernochan Walter E. Sachs

[graphic]

Copyright by Harris and Ewing Assistant Secretaries of the various Executive Departments of the Federal

Governmen at Washington

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Representatives of Coal Operators and Miners following recent conference with

President Harding and Secretaries Hoover and Davis at the White House

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Badorsed by the Executive Committee of the Trust Company Division, American Bankers' Association

Vol. XXXV

July, 1922

Number One

T

CURE FOR

FOR BOLSHEVISM IN AMERICA

THE WAY TO INDUSTRIAL PEACE
HE license of industrial warfare, tolerates them. A nation which today

with its unpunished and repeated stands exalted above all others in defense
acts of terrorism, of wholesale mur of the ideals of international peace and

ders, of coercion and open mockery righteousness may also be relied upon to of law and order, has reached a stage which blaze the way to industrial peace by chartmust be regarded by every straight-thinking ing a course for toilers which will assure for American as a severe indictment against them the realization of their honest aspirathe impotency and pusillanimous attitude tions. The way out will not be through of public authorities, both Federal and drastic measures against the mass of deState. On a par with the most inhuman luded workers who are deserving of wholeatrocities committed by Germany during hearted sympathy in striving for the comthe war, and by the Trotzky régime in fort and happiness of their wives and Russia, the slaughter of defenseless non children. The remedy will come through union miners in southern Illinois is a concentration of public wrath and swift disgraceful affront to our constitutional retribution for those men whom President government which becomes even more ab- Harding had in mind when he said recently horrent because of the cowardly failure of at Marion: local and State officials to mete out punish "My one outstanding conviction, after ment. The conscience of the American sixteen months in the Presidency, is that people, so quick and terrible in its might the greatest traitor to his country is he to resist foreign aggression, must not and who appeals to prejudice and inflames cannot fail of a new awakening in order to passion, when sober judgment and honest crush this open rebellion as well as the more speech are so necessary to firmly established insidious invasions that threaten to destroy tranquility and security.” national guarantees of equal justice, of Flag shouting, Fourth of July orations protection to individual life, liberty and and phonographic recitation of the Declarproperty.

ation of Independence will get us nowhere. Red-blooded Americanism has come to The feelings of outraged citizenship must the parting of the ways with misguided be translated into action and definite prolabor, led by bull-necked, brutal and self- cedure. In time of war we deal summarily seeking leaders, many of whom are of foreign with traitors. Why not in time of industrial birth and traitors at heart to the land that warfare? Jail is the place for fire-eating

labor leaders who inflame passion and prej- set up false standards of living. Despite udice and the spirit of insurrection. The their hypocritical professions of patriotism great majority of wage earners are law the labor leaders have adroitly played upon abiding and responsive to reason. It is passions and prejudices of illiterate minds their leaders who conspire in secret, who so that the ranks of labor have become use them as tools and who openly preach saturated with communistic and socialistic resistance to constitutional authority and poison. The American Federation of Labor assail the highest courts of the land. If votes against recognition of the Russian labor leaders can openly defy the United Soviet and the revolutionary designs of States Supreme Court, disobey the find radical delegates, knowing full well that ings of legal tribunals and instill the doc- it would be signing its own death warrant trine of hate with impunity, what is to be by declaring openly for “direct action." expected of the herded followers.

In substance, however, its program might We must have co-ordination and invig- have been written in Moscow with its oration of the Federal, State, county and avowed declaration to "scrap” constitulocal instrumentals of law and order. If tional safeguards, to render the United the murderers in the Illinois coal fields States Supreme court and lower courts escape punishment it will breed greater subservient to political whim and to do contempt for law. If the public conscience away with all Federal laws of injunction and continues to slumber we shall have an "in restraint upon the lawlessness of union labor. visible government” controlled by ruffians National elections are drawing near. Let to take the place of that at Washington, it be frankly proclaimed through every The answer is that craven politicians and public channel that there must be a new, weaklings who cower before the union

constructive statesmanship to guide labor; labor vote must be swept out of public that the present leaders are traitors to office and men elected or appointed who the men they lead as well as to the nation. will be fearless and one hundred per cent. Let the fact be known that because of the , Americans in performance of their duties.

false doctrines, the hostility and the stu-
pidity of labor leaders in resisting necessary

adjustments, this country is prevented CONSTRUCTIVE INDUSTRIAL from making the best use of its matchless POLICIES

resources of wealth and raw material. T of labor must take a firm stand for HE time has come when employers Wages and living standards here are far

above those of any other country. Even the principle enunciated by Presi in the face of strikes among coal miners, dent Harding in his recent speech. when

railroad men and textile workers, the nahe said, "A free American has the right to tion is steadily overcoming depression and labor without any other's leave; men must

the after effects of the war. How much be free to live and achieve.” Únion labor greater would be the pace of industrial as today conducted is absolutely hostile recovery, of economic readjustment and to this inalienable right. Men are forced

distribution of prosperity if labor were to join unions and pay dues and assessments efficiently guided by wise counsel and ecofor which the leaders make no accounting.

nomic truth. The laborer must live up to the rules. He It is chiefly because of the obstructions cannot advance on merit. His hours are of organized labor and the erroneous imfixed as well as his output. The result is pression that the abnormally high wages increasing inefficiency, higher costs and de- that prevailed during the war can be concreased production. In short, unionism tinued in time of peace, that this country spells industrial decay. It benefits only is actually surfeited with idle capital and the bosses and the walking delegates. credit that should be put to work. With

The menace is not only confined to in- high cost of production, due to proportion Justry and misdirection of labor's proper of earnings demanded by labor, we cannot aims. It strikes deeper, at the very root hope to compete in international markets vi our social, political and judicial systems. and with the further consequence of reThe war has intensified class bitterness and stricted consumption at home.

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