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Most Honorable Privy Council, Knight Com- | and for the exclusive control by the commission mander of the Most Honorable Order of the herein provided for of the proposed exhibition, Bath, her Britannic Majesty's Envoy Extraord- the President shall, through the Department of inary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the Uni- State, make proclamation of the same, setting ted States of America, duly authorized for this forth the time at which the exhibition will purpose by their respective Governments, having open, and the place at which it will be held; met together at Washington, and having sound and he shall communicate to the diplomatic repthat laws required to carry the Articles resentatives of all nations copies of the same, XVIII to XXV, inclusive, and Article XXX of together with such regulations as may be adopted the treaty aforesaid into operation, have been by the commissioners, for publication in their passed by the Imperial Parliament of Great Brit- respective countries ;" ain, by the Parliament of Canada, and by the And whereas his excellency the Governor of Legislature of Prince Edward's Island on the the State of Pennsylvania did, on the twentyone part, and by the Congress of the United fourth day of June, eighteen hundred and sevStates on the other, hereby declare that Articles enty-three, inform me that provision has been XVIII tu XXV, inclusive, and Article XXX of made for the erection of said buildings, and for the treaty between Her Britannic Majesty and the exclusive control by the commission provided the United States of America of the 8th of May, for in the said act of the proposed exhibition; 1871, will take effect on the first day of July And whereas the President of the United States next.

Centennial Commission has officially informed “In witness whereof the undersigned have me of the dates fixed for the opening and closing signed this protocol, and have hereunto affixed of the said exhibition, and the place at which it their seals.

is to be held: · Done in duplicate at Washington, this sev- Now, therefore, be it known that I, Ulysses S. enth day of June, 1873.

Grant, President of the United States, in con(Seal) (Signed) “HAMILTON FISH. formity with the provisions of the act of Congress

(Seal) (Signed) “Edw'd THORNTON.” aforesaid, do hereby declare and proclaim that Now, therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, President in the State of Pennsylvania, an international

there will be held, at the city of Philadelphia, of the United States of America, in pursuance of exhibition of arts, manufactures, and products the premises, do hereby declare that I have received satisfactory evidence that the Imperial teenth day of April, Anno Domini eighteen nun

of the soil and mine, to be opened on the nineParliament of Great Britain, the Parliament of dred and seventy-six, and to be closed on the Canada, and the Legislature of Prince Edward's nineteenth day of October, in the same year. Island, have passed laws on their part to give full effect to the provisions of the said treaty as domestic and international friendship and inter

And in the interest of peace, civilization, and contained in articles eighteenth to twenty; course, I commend the celebration and exhibition fifth, inclusive, and article thirtieth of said to the people of the United States ; and, in beTreaty. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my commend them to all nations who may be pleased

half of this Government and people, I cordially hand, and caused the seal of the United States to

to take part therein. be affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this first day hand and caused the seal of the United States to

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my of July, in the year of our Lord one

be affixed. thousand eight hundred and seventy(SEAL.] three, and of the independence of the

Done at the city of Washington this third day United States of America the ninety

of July, one thousand eight hundred seventh. U. S. GRANT. (L. s.]

and seventy-three, and of the independ

ence of the United States the ninetyBy the President:

seventh.

U. S. GRANT HAMILTON FISH, Secretary of State.

By the President:

HAMILTON FISH, Secretary of State. Proclamation that an International

Exhibition of Arts, Manufactures, Proclamation respecting Discriminatand Products of the Soil and Mine

ing Duties on French Vessels, Sepwill be opened in Philadelphia April tember 22, 1873. 19, 1876, July 3, 1873.

Whereas satisfactory evidence was given me Whereas by the act of Congress approved March on the 13th day of September current, by the third, eighteen hundred and seventy-one, pro- Marquis de Noailles, Envoy Extraordinary and viding for a national celebration of the one hun- Minister Plenipotentiary from the French Redredth anniversary of the independence of the public, that on and after the 1st day of October United States, by the holding of an international next, merchandise imported into France in vesexhibition of arts, manufactures, and products of sels of the United States, from whatever country, the soil and mine, in the city of Philadelphia, in will be subject to no other duties or imposts than the year eighteen hundred and seventy-six, it is those which shall be collected upon merchandise provided as follows:

imported into France from countries of its origin " That whenever the President shall be in- or from any other country in French vessels : formed by the Governor of the State of Pennsyl- Now, therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, President vania that provision has been made for the of the United States of America, by virtue of the erection of suitable buildings for the purpose, I authority vested in me by law, do hereby declare and proclaim that on and after the 1st day forthwith by proclamation command such insurof October next, so long as merchandise im- gents to disperse and retire peaceably to their ported into France in vessels of the United respective houses within a limited time: States, whether from the countries of its origin Now, therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, President or from other countries, shall be admitted into of the United States, do hereby make proclamathe ports of France on the terms aforesaid, the tion and command all turbulent and disorderly discriminating duties heretofore levied upon persons to disperse and retire peaceably to their merchandise imported into the United States in respective abodes within ten days from this date, French vessels, either from the countries of its and hereafter to submit themselves to the lawful origin or from any other country, shall be and authority of said executive and the other constiare discontinued and abolished.

tuted authorities of said State; and I invoke the In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my aid and co-operation of all good citizens to uphand and caused the seal of the United States to hold law and preserve public peace. be affixed.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my Done at the city of Washington this twenty- hand, and caused the seal of the United States

second day of September, in the year of to be affixed.

our Lord one thousand eight hundred and Done at the city of Washington this fifteenth (L. 8.] seventy-three, and of the independence of

day of May, in the year of our Lord the United States of America the ninety

eighteen hundred and seventy-four, eighth.

U.S. GRANT. [SEAL.) and the independence of the United By the President:

States the ninety-eighth. J. C. BANCROFT DAVIS,

By the President:

U. S. GRANT. Acting Secretary of State.

HAMILTON Fisi, Secretary of State. Commanding the Dispersion of all Proclamation announcing that the

Turbulent and Disorderly Persons Imperial Parliament of Great Britain in Arkansas, May 15, 1874.

and the Legislature of Newfound. Whereas certain turbulent and disorderly per

land have given effect to Articles

18th to 25th inclusive and Article sons pretending that Elisha Baxter, the present executive of Arkansas, was not elected, have com

30th of the Treaty of Washington, bined together with force and arms to resist his

May 29th, 1874. authority as such executive, and other author- Whereas, by the thirty-third article of a treaty ities of said State; and whereas said Elisha Bax: concluded at Washington the 8th day of May, ter has been declared duly elected by the General 1871, between the United States and Her BriAssembly of said State, as provided in the con- tannic Majesty, it was provided that “Articles stitution thereof, and has for a long period been XVIII to XXV, inclusive, and Article XXX of exercising the functions of said office, into which this treaty, shall take effect as soon as the laws he was inducted according to the constitution required to carry them into operation shall have and laws of said State, and ought by its citizens been passed by the Imperial Parliament of Great to be considered as the lawful executive thereof; Britain, by the Parliament of Canada, and by and whereas it is provided in the Constitution of the Legislature of Prince Edward's Island, on the United States that the United States shall the one hand, and by the Congress of the United protect every State in the Union, on application States on the other; and whereas it is provided of the Legislature, or the Executive when the by Article XXXII of the treaty aforesaid that Legislature cannot be convened, against domes- the provisions and stipulations of article XVIII tic violence; and whereas said Elisha Baxter, to XXV of this treaty, inclusive, shall extend to under section 4 of article 4 of the Constitution the colony of Newfoundland, so far as they are of the United States, and the laws passed in par- applicable. But if the Imperial Parliament, the suance thereof, has heretofore made application Legislature of Newfoundland, or the Congress of to me to protect said State and the citizens there the United States shall not embrace the colony of against domestic violence; and whereas the of Newfoundland in their laws enacted for carGeneral Assembly of said State convened in extra rying the foregoing articles into effect, then this session at the capital thereof on the 11th instant, article shall be of no effect; but the omission to pursuant to a call made by said Elisha Baxter, make provision by law to give it effect by either and both Houses thereof have passed a joint reso- of the legislative bodies aforesaid shall not in lution also applying to me to protect the State any way impair any other articles of this treaty." against domestic violence; and whereas it is And whereas by the second section of an act, provided in the laws of the United States that entitled "An act to carry into effect the provisin all cases of insurrection in any State, or of ions of the treaty between the United States and obstruction to the laws thereof, it sliall be lawful Great Britain, signed in the city of Washington for the President of the United States, on appli- the 8th day of May, eighteen hundred and sevcation of the Legislature of such State, or by the enty-one, relating to the fisheries," it is proexecutive when the Legislature cannot be con- vided: “That whenever the colony of Newfoundvened, to employ such part of the land and naval land shall give its consent to the application of forces as shall be judged necessary for the pur- the stipulations and provisions of the said articles pose of suppressing such insurrection, or causing eighteenth to twenty-fifth of said treaty, inclu. the laws to be duly executed; and whereas it is sive, to that colony, and the Legislature thereof required that whenever it may be necessary, in and the Imperial Parliament shall pass the nethe judgment of the President, to use the mili: cessary laws for that purpose, the above enumertary force for the purpose aforesaid, he shall | ated articles, being the products of the fisheries of the colony of Newfoundland, shall be admitted cles eighteenth to twenty-fifth, inclusive, of the into the United States free of duty from and after said treaty extended to it, and to allow the Unithe date of a proclamation of the President of the ted States the full benefits of all the stipulations United States declaring that he has satisfactory, therein contained, and shall be so admitted free evidence that the said colony of Newfoundland of duty, so long as the said articles eighteenth to has consented, in a due and proper manner, to twenty-fifth, inclusive, and article thirtieth of have the provisions of the said articles eigh said treaty, shall remain in force, according to teenth to twenty-fifth, inclusive, of the said the terms and conditions of article thirty-third treaty extended to it, and to allow the United of said treaty.' States the full benefits of all the stipulations “And whereas an act was passed by the Govtherein contained, and shall be so admitted free ernor, Legislative Council, and Assembly of Newof duty so long as the said articles eighteenth to foundland, in legislative session convened, in the twenty-fifth, inclusive, and article thirtieth of thirty-seventh year of Her Majesty's reign, and said treaty shall remain in force, according to assented to by Her Majesty on the 12th day of the terms and conditions of articles thirty-third May, 1874, entitled 'An act to carry into effect of said treaty;" and whereas the Secretary of the provisions of the treaty of Washington, as State of the United States and Her Britannic far as they relate to this colony.' Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister "The undersigned, Hamilton Fish, Secretary Plenipotentiary at Washington have recorded in of State of the United States, and the Right Hona protocol of a conference held by them at the orable Sir Edward Thornton one of Her Majesty's Department of State in Washington on the 28th most honorable Privy Council, Knight Comday of May, 1874, in the following language: mander of the most honorable Order of the Bath, “Protocol of a conference received at Washing. Her Britannic Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary

ton on the twenty-eighth day of May, one and Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States thousand eight hundred and seventy-four.

of America, duly authorized for this purpose by "Whereas it is provided by article XXXII of their respective Governments, having met tothe treaty between the United States of America gether at Washington, and having found that and Her Majesty, the Queen of the United King- the laws required to carry the articles XVIII to dom of Great Britain and Ireland, signed at to XXV inclusive, and articles XXX and XXXII, Washington on the 8th day of May, 1871, as of the treaty aforesaid into operation, have been follows:

passed by the Congress of the United States on CLE XXXII.

the one part, and by the Imperial Parliament of "It is further agreed that the provisions and Great Britain, by the Parliament of Canada, and stipulations of articles XVIII to XXV of this by the Legislature of Prince Edward's Island Newfoundland, so far as they are applicable.clusive, and article XXX, of the treaty between treaty, inclusive, shall extend to the colony of and the Legislature of Newfoundland on tbe

other, hereby declare articles XVIII to XXV inBut if the Imperial Parliament, the Legislature the United States of America and Her Britannic of Newfoundland, or the Congress of the United States, shall not embrace the colony of New- Majesty shall take effect, in accordance with foundland in their laws enacted for carrying the article

XXXII! of said treaty between the citiforegoing articles into effect, then this article zens of the United States of America and Her shall be of no effect; but the omission to make Majesty's subjects in the colony of Newfoundprovision by law to give it effect, by either of land, on the first day of June next. the legislative bodies aforesaid, shall not in any signed this protocol, and have hereunto afised

“In witness whereof the undersigned have way impair any other articles of this treaty.

their seals. "And whereas an act was passed by the Sen. ate and House of Representatives of the United

"Done in duplicate at Washington, this States of America in Congress assembled, and twenty-eighth day of May, 1874. approved on the first day of March, 1873, by

HAMILTON FISH.

'(L. s.] the President of the United States, entitled · An

'(L. S.]

ED'WD THORNTON." act to carry into effect the provisions of the Now, therefore, I, Ulysses S. Grant, President treaty between the United States and Great of the United States of America, in pursuance of Britain, signed in the city of Washington the the premises, do hereby declare that I have reeighth of May, 1871, relating to fisheries,' by ceived satisfactory evidence that the Imperial Parwhich act it is provided :

liament of Great Britain and the Legislature of * SEC. 2. That whenever the colony of New- Newfoundland have passed laws on their part to foundland shall give its consent to the applica- give full effect to the provisions of the said treaty, tion of the stipulations and provisions of the said as contained in articles eighteenth to twentyarticles eighteenth to twenty-fifth of said treaty, fifth, inclusive, and article thirtieth of said treaty. inclusive, to that colony, and the Legislature In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my thereof, and the Imperial Parliament, shall pass hand, and caused the seal of the United States the necessary laws for that purpose, the above to be affixed. enumerated articles, being the produce of the Done at the city of Washington, this twentyfisheries of the colony of Newfoundland, shall be ninth day of May, in the year of our admitted into the United States free of duty from Lord one thousand eight hundred and and after the

date of a proclamation by the Pres- [SEAL.] seventy-four, and of the independence ident of the United States, declaring that he has

of the United States of America the satisfactory evidence that the said colony of New- ninety-eighth.

U. S. GRANT. foundland has consented, in a due and proper By the Pres ent: manner, to have the provisions of the said arti- HAMILTON FISH, Secretary of State.

X.

PRESIDENT GRANT'S INTERVIEWS AND LETTERS ON

PUBLIC AFFAIRS.

On Currency and Finance. ther from my mind than a threat. My whole

object was to restore confidence to the public The President's Letters written during the Panic mind, and to give assurances that the Govern. of 1873."

ment would give all the aid in its power, keep[Reprinted from newspaper copies.) ing in view, at the same time, the solvency of

EXECUTIVE MANSION, the national Treasury. WASHINGTON, D. C., September 28, 1873. You and all bank presidents know more about Messrs. H. B. CLAFLIN and CHARLES L. ANTÁNY: the condition of your banks than I can possibly

GENTLEMEN: In response to the news you know. In turn, I, through the Secretary of the have communicated to me touching the present Treasury, know more about the financial condi. stringency in the money market of the country, tion of the Government, its ability to render aid, and the necessary steps to restore confidence and &c., than any person disconnected from the adlegitimate trade and commerce, I have the honor ministration of its affairs can know. I alluded to communicate the following:

to the fact that the forty-million reserve notes in The Government is desirous of doing all in its the Treasury would be regarded as money in the power to relieve the present unsettled condition Treasury subject to use, for the purpose of showof business affairs, which is holding back the ing that the means are at hand to give the relief immense resources of the country pow awaiting we promise. transportation to the seaboard and a market. I do not believe the present panic will work

Confidence on the part of the people is the to individuals half the injury it will work genfirst thing needed to relieve this condition and eral good to the country at large. Our moneto avert the threatened destruction of business, tary system is the creation of necessity. It has with its accompanying disasters to all classes of no elasticity, but in other respects it is the best the people. To re-establish this feeling the Gov. that has ever been devised. No one now disernment is willing to take all legal measures at trusts the value of his paper dollar; on the conits command; but it is evident that no Govern- trary, it is seized and hoarded with the same ment efforts will avail without the active co-ope- avidity now that the gold dollar has been in ration of the banks and moneyed corporations former like adversities. The panic will call atof the country.

tention to the defects in our monetary system, With the fourteen millions already paid out and will no doubt load to legislation to relieve in the purchase of the Government indebtedness the want of elasticity. and the withdrawal of their large deposits from The panic has brought greenbacks about to a the Treasury, the banks are now strong enough par with silver. I wonder that silver is not to adopt a liberal policy on their part, and by a already coming into the market to supply the generous system of discounts to sustain the busi- deficiency in the circulating medium. When it ness interests of the country. Should such a does come and I predict that will soon-we course be pursued the forty-four millions of re- will have made a rapid stride toward specie payserve will be considered as money in the Treas- ments. Currency will never go below silver ury to meet the demards of the public necessity after that. as the circumstances of the country may require. The circulation of silver will have other beneClose attention will be given to the course pur- ficial effects. Experience has proved that it sued by those who have the means at their com- takes about forty millions of fractional currency mand of rendering all the aid necessary to restore to make the small change necessary for the transtrade to its proper channels and condition, with action of the business of the country. Silver will a view of strengthening the hands of those who gradually take the place of this currency, and, carry out the measures above indicated. Orders further, will become the standard of values, have already been issued for the prepayment of which will be boarded in a small way. the interest accruing in November.

I estimate that this will consume from two to U. S. GRANT. three hundred millions, in time, of this species

of our circulating medium. It will leave the EXECUTIVE MANSION, paper currency free to perform the legitimate WASHINGTON, D. C., October 6, 1873. functions of trade, and will tend to bring us back MY DEAR MR. COWDREY: Your letter of the where we must come at last—to a specie basis. 20th ultimo was duly received and read, as was I confess to a desire to see a limited hoarding of your previous letter. Neither required an an. money. It insures a firm foundation in time of ewer particularly, and hence I did not answer need. But I want to see the hoarding of somethem at that time. Your last letter, however, thing that has a standard of value the world contains one sentence that it seems proper that over. Silver has this, and if we once get back I should reply to, that is as to an implied threat to that our strides toward a higher appreciation to the national banks contained in my letter to of our currency will be rapid. Messrs. Anthony and Claflin. Nothing was fur-! Our mines are now producing almost unlimited amounts of silver, and it is becoming a question, I were appointed, a memorial to the PRESIDENT, " What shall we do with it?” I suggest here a with the resolutions adopted by the citizens solution that will answer for some years, and of Boston, was prepared and signed by all of suggest to you bankers whether you may not the committee, including myself. It was un imitate it: To put it in circulation now; keep derstood that I should, as chairman, keep my it there until it is fixed, and then we will find self informed of the progress of the bill in the other markets. The South and Central American House of Representatives, and notify you when countries have asked us to coin their silver for it became necessary to go to Washington. We them. There has never been authority of law all agreed to visit that city and present the mo to do so.

I trust it will now be given. When morial to the PRESIDENT as soon as the bill it is given, it will be more than the equivalent should have passed the House. of becoming exporters of articles of manufac- On Tuesday, the 14th instant, I went to New ture which were previously articles of import. York, on my way to Washington, and on the Orders will come for large amounts of coin. It evening of that day, while there, was informed will be all in silver, while payments are not by telegraph of the passage of the bill, and notis necessarily so. We become the manufacturer fied you immediately that I desired to meet you of this currency, with a profit, and will probably in Washington on Thursday morning, the 16tẢ secure a portion of our pay in the more precious instant. When I reached the capital at midnight metal.

on Wednesday, I learned by telegraph that none I have thought much about the recommenda- of you could be there before the following Satur tions I should make to Congress, and have day morning. changed slightly in regard to bankiog laws since As I had the original memorial, with the signaI last had the pleasure of a personal interview tures of the whole committee, I decided to wait with you. It is not necessary to state what at once upon the PRESIDENT and present it to those changes are, because they may undergo him. further modification. I shall give to the subject, I called upon General Sherman, who kindly however, my sincerest thoughts, and will court offered to go with me to the PRESIDENT, and I the views of others.

gladly accepted his offer. We went, and were I have written this hastily, but if it calls forth admitted at once, when General Sherman im any views you would like to express I will be mediately left the PRESIDENT and myself alone glad to hear them. Yours, truly,

together, and no other person was present dur U. S. GRANT ing the interview.

I stated to the PezsIDENT that a large public A Denial Made.

meeting, the numbers of which were estimated

by the newspapers from 2,500 to 4,000 persons, A "special" having been published in the had been recently held in Faneuil Hall; that New York Times of March 21, 1874, purporting resolutions had been unanimously adopted, and to indicate the PRESIDENT's purpose to veto a a committee appointed to present them, with a pending bill, if passed, the PRESIDENT author- memorial to be prepared by them, to the PRESA ized the following denial to be telegraphed by DENT: that the legislation of the House had ada the reporter of the Associated Press, and it was vanced rapidly, and my associates were unpre published March 23 :

pared to leave home at the moment, and could President Grant, in conversation with a lead- not reach Washington before Saturday; that I ing Western Republican Senator, said the state- regretted their absence, but as the paper which ment in a Washington dispatch to a New York I had with me had been signed by every one of paper published Saturday morning, that any them delay seemed unnecessary, and I requested legislation tending to inflation must run the his permission to read the resolutions and me gauntlet of his veto, was wholly without founda- morial to him, to which request he assented. tion; that he had conversed with no one on the I read the paper through without interruption subject, and if he were a member of Congress he from the PRESIDENT. When I had finished ho should regard an intimation of a veto in advance said: “There are two things in that paper

which of legislation as an unbecoming threat by the I do not like. The resolutions say the legal tender Executive, and should resent it.

acts were first declared unconstitutional, and

afterwards constitutional by a majority of one Interview with Boston Merchants. vote. That is not exactly so. The resolutions

attack 1874, April 4—A meeting was held in Boston legal tender notes should have been paid with

my administration, in saying that the "to protest against inflation,” and passed resolutions and appointed a committee to present long bonds. This was the policy of my admin

the reserves instead of using them to buy up them to the PRESIDENT. Mr. WILLIAM GRAY, of that committee, made this report of the inter: istration, and such a resolution is an attack view :

upon it which I do not like. I think that policy

is right, and they call it wrong. That policy John H. Clifford, William Gaston, John M. reduced the premium on gold from 34 per cento

Forbes, Henry P. Kidder, and M. D. Spauld- to 13 per cent." ing, esquires, my associates upon the committee I replied that it was the general understand appointed by the meeting at Faneuil Hall, ing that the citizens of the United States were April 4, 1874. to present its resolutions and a at full liberty to assemble in public meetings memorial to the President of the United States: and pass any resolutions which they saw fit and GENTLEMEN: You are aware that directly present them to the PraSIDENT, observing proper after the meeting in Faneuil Hall, by which welcourtesy; that I did not write the resolutions,

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