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nected with Natural Theology. By HENRY LORD

BROUGHAM.

V. THE BELGIAN REVOLUTION

141

History of the Netherlands. By Thomas Col-

LEY GRATTAN.

VI. Anthon's ClassiCAL DICTIONARY

175

A Classical Dictionary. Containing an Account

of the principal Proper Names mentioned in An-

cient Authors. By Charles ANTHON, LL. D.

VII. CHANDLER'S AMERICAN CRIMINAL TRIALS . 199

American Criminal

By PELEG W.

CHANDLER.

VIII. THEORY AND PRACTICE THE FEDERAL Gov-

ERNMENT

211

1. The Jubilee of the Constitution ; A Dis-

À

course delivered at the Request of the New York

Historical Society in the City of New York. By

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS.

2. An Oration on the Material Growth and Ter-

ritorial Progress of the United States. By CALEB

CUSHING.

3. Representative Democracy in the United

States. By BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BUTLER.

IX. CRITICAL Notices.

1. Stone's Life and Times of Red-Jacket 227

2. Ames's Mnemosynum

229

3. Tillinghast's Plane Geometry

230

4. Drake's Book of the Indians

231

5. Hopkins's Connexion between Taste and

Morals

232

6. D'Israeli's Amenities of Literature

233

7. Shattuck's Complete Family Registration 235

8. Hitchcock's Elementary Geology

238

9. Coleridge on the Greek Classic Poets 239

10. Sherwin's Treatise on Algebra

240

11. Plumer's Poems

241

12. Johnson on the Manufacture of Iron

243

13. Motherwell's Poems

244

14. Theory of Teaching

246

15. Goethe's Egmont

250

16. Stevens's Historical Discourse

253

17. Louisiana Law Journal

257

18. Brainard's Poems

. 258

QUARTERLY LIST OF New PUBLICATIONS

259

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vided to subdue him, have alone been generally within the common view ; while the peculiar character of the country, and the admirable adroitness with which the Indians avail thernselves of it, have been little comprehended or regarded. Nor have this impatience and misapprehension been confined to the public mind. The government has fully shared in them, having often evinced, by its orders and measures, confidence of expectation which experience has not warranted.

It is well, therefore, at this late stage of the contest, when both the public and the government have become more sober and patient in their feelings on the subject, to take a brief review of its origin and progress. The page of history might be marked by much exaggeration and misstatement, if it were left to be filled up by the representations and opinions that have generally prevailed.

We have selected, for reference, the speech of Mr. Everett of Vermont, as presenting as succinct and fair an account of the treaty which opened the way to this memorable war, as any document within our reach. Mr. Everett took a leading part in the debates on this treaty, when some appropriation in connexion with it introduced the subject to Congress. No member of that body, probably, became more thoroughly acquainted with all the facts of the case. We may, therefore, place reliance on the statement of them which he makes in this speech.

Colonel Gadsden's treaty with the Florida Indians was made in 1832. These Indians were not generally inclined to change their residence, having always manifested reluctance to open negotiations which had such a proceeding in view. They were, however, persuaded to meet the United States' commissioner at “Payne's Landing,” and there consented, through their principal chiefs, with all the usual sanctions, to an arrangement which had their emigration for its ultimate object. The principal article in this arrangement was, that a delegation from the tribes should visit the country proposed to be occupied, and determine upon its eligibility. Thus far the steps taken appear to have encountered no obstacle. All proceedings were in harmony and good faith, though even then difficulties were likely to arise. The terms of the treaty required that one third of the Indians should remove during the following year, that is, in 1833. Now, as the

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