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Saginaw, Second district-George Ward.
Sanilac—Herbert H. Hoffman.
Schoolcraft District-Alex. Sly.
Shiawassee John Y. Martin.
St. Clair, First district-Alexander Cowan.
St. Clair, Second district-James M. Haviland.
St. Joseph-Lester B. Place.
Tuscola--Alonzo J. Sherman.
Van Buren-Lynn J. Lewis.
Washtenaw, First district—Daniel B. Sutton.
Washtenaw, Second district-George S. Wright.
Wayne, First district-Noble Ashley.

Charles H. Culver.
Charles Flowers.
Sheridan D. Ford.
James D. Jerome.
William H. Jones.
Herman L. Koehler.
William H. Martz.
Homer McGraw.
George P. Palmer.

John Stevenson.
Wayne, Second district-Allan L. Lamphere.
Wayne, Third district—Edward Gayde.
Wayne, Fourth district-Ari H. Woodruff.
Wexford District-Frank A. Smith.

I, Coleman C. Vaughan, Secretary of State of the State of Michigan, do hereby certify that I have compared the annexed and foregoing list of all the members-elect of the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Michigan, for the years 1915 and 1916, with the original returns, as transmitted to me by the clerks of the several counties in the State, and that it is a true and correct list. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereto affixed my signature and the

great Seal of the State, at Lansing, this (SEAL)

fourth day of January, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred fifteen.

COLEMAN C. VAUGHAN,

Secretary of State.

By Geo. L. Lusk, Deputy Secretary of State.

The members-elect of the House appeared at the Clerk's desk and took and subscribed the constitutional oath of office, which was administered by Hon. Flavius L. Brooke, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

The roll of the House was called by the Clerk, who announced that all the members were present except Mr. Samuel J. Smith.

Mr. Wolcott moved that the House take a recess until 2:30 o'clock P. m.

The motion prevailed, the time being 12:35 o'clock p. m.

AFTER RECESS.

2:30 o'clock p. m.

The House was called to order by the Clerk.

The Clerk announced that Mr. Samuel J. Smith, who was not present when the constitutional oath of office was administered to the other members-elect, had taken the oath of office before Chief Justice Brooke of the Supreme Court and is now present as a member of the House.

The Clerk announced that the first business in order was the drawing of seats in accordance with the statute.

The statute having been read, and a boy, Gardner Palmer, of Detroit, blindfolded for the purpose, the seats were drawn as follows:

Seat No. Mr. Amon

98 Anderson

21 Ashley

32 Averill

99 Biggerstaff

82 Bosch

23 Chapin

1 Clark

54 Cowan

3 Croll

46 Culver

80 Daigneau

93 Daprato

45 De Boer

78 Edwards

4 Empson

70

11 Ewing

8 Flowers

66 Follett

44 Foote

33 Ford, Ransom L....

Evens

30 Ford, Sheridan

79 Francis Gayde

85 Gettel

13 60

Green

Mr. Griggs

Haviland
Henry
Hinkley
Hoffman
Hopkins
Hulse
Jerome, James D.
Jerome, William F.
Jones
Keen
Kemmerling
Koehler
Kooyers
Lamphere
Leland
Lewis ..
McGraw
McMillan
Martin
Martz
Matthews
Miller
Moore
Nank
Nelson
Oakley
O'Brien
Olmsted
Ormsbee
Palmer
Penney
Person
Petermann
Place
Pray
Quintel
Read, Thomas
Reed, Clarence J.
Rice
Robertson
Rogers
Root
Ross
Schmidt
Sherman
Shields
Sly
Smith, Charles W.
Smith, Frank A.
Smith, Newel
Smith, Samuel J....

Seat No.

76 19 48 42 25 28

5 47 27 49

9 41 36 35 84 71 56 65 26 53

2 58 100 73 20 15 50 22 14 51 69 77 39 34 68 94

29

62 96 63 87 97 89 16 91 57 24 10 38

.

90 Seat No.

86 37

81 67 92 31 12 17

64

Mr. Snow

Sours
Stevens
Stevenson
Sutton
Symonds
Tufts
Van Antwerp
Vine
Ward
Warner
Watkins
Weissert
Wells
Whiteley
Wieland
Wiley
Wolcott
Wood ..
Woodruff
Wright

88 74 43 55 40

6 72 61 75 18 95 59 83 52

Mr. Wolcott moved that the House take a recess until 4:15 o'clock p. m.

The motion prevailed.

AFTER RECESS.

4:15 o'clock p. m.

· The House was called to order by the Clerk.

The Clerk announced that the next business in order was the election of a Speaker.

The roll was called by the Clerk and the members voted as follows:

For Charles W. Smith:

Mr. Amon

Anderson Ashley Averill Biggerstaff Bosch Chapin Clark Cowan Croll

Mr. Gettel

Green
Griggs
Haviland
Henry
Hinkley
Hoffman
Hopkins
Hulse
Jerome, J. D.

Mr. Moore

Nank
Nelson
Oakley
O'Brien
Olmsted
Ormsbee
Palmer
Penney
Person

Mr. Smith, F. A.

Smith, Newel
Smith, S. J.
Snow
Sours
Stevens
Stevenson
Sutton
Symonds
Tufts

Mr. Culver

Daigneau
Da prato
De Boer
Edy
Empson
Evens
Ewing
Flowers
Follett
Foote
Ford, R. L.
Ford, Sheridan
Francis
Gayde

Mr. Jerome, W. F.

Jones
Keen
Kemmerling
Koehler
Kooyers
Lamphere
Leland
Lewis
McGraw
McMillan
Martin
Martz
Matthews
Miller

Mr. Petermann

Place
Pray
Quintel
Read, Thos.
Reed, C. J.
Rice
Robertson
Rogers
Root
Ross
Schmidt
Sherman
Shields
Sly

Mr. Van Antwerp

Vine
Ward
Warner
Watkins
Weissert
Wells
Whiteley
Wieland
Wiley
Wolcott
Wood
Woodruff
Wright

98

The Clerk announced that Charles W. Smith, having received a majority of all the votes cast for the office of Speaker, was duly elected Speaker of the House.

The Clerk then named as a committee to conduct the Speaker-elect to the Chair, Messrs. Ashley, Henry and Moore.

The committee performed the duty assigned it and through its chairman introduced the Speaker-elect, who then addressed the House as follows:

Gentlemen of the House:

I have been grooming myself for this office, as nearly all of you know, for the past four years. During the session of 1911 I was urged by good friends to get ready for this office. It is my opinion that when you start to get ready for anything you should take time enough to get ready, so you will be prepared when you get it; and for that reason I have been all this time. But had I been able at any time to have framed up a deal that would have been satisfactory to me, my fondest hopes never would have allowed me to have fixed things up as well as my friends have fixed them up for me. I never expected that I would have the honor of being the unanimous choice of the Republican caucus, and in a similar caucus to be the unanimous choice of the Democrats as well, as happened last night.

We have before us in this session lot of hard work to do. It is my belief that the best thing for us to do, in order that we may be able to go ahead with our work, is to get acquainted with each other just as fast as we can. There are some 67 members of this House who were not in the session of 1913, and I believe that is the duty of the members of the 1913 Legislature to use every effort to get acquainted as rapidly as possible with the new members, and to help the new members to get acquainted with each other, because I believe we shall not be able to do anything until we have accomplished that. There are ninety-nine of you and only one of me. It is going to be very easy for each and every one of you to remember me, but I have got a job ninety-nine fold, to remember you. I will take it as a favor if each and every one of you will make yourself known to me every time you meet me, if I do not already know who you are. I am not very old in

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