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He's a'e sae kind and winsome,

While we walk an the lea;
And though the pride of lifty maidft,

He a'e returns to me.

Then do not bid him gang, mither,

And prayers will ever flow;
Indeed 'twad brak my heart, mither,

To bid dear Willie go:
He's a'e sae kind and winsome,

When we walk an the lea;
And though the pride of fifty maids,

He a'e returns to me.

I KNOW A MAIDEN FAIR TO SEE.

BY HENRY W. LONGPELLOW.

I Know a maiden fair to see,

Take care!
She can both false and friendly be,

Beware! Beware!

Trust her not, She is fooling thee! U*

She has two eyes, so soft and brown,

Take care! She gives a side-glance and looks down,

Beware! Beware!

Trust her not, She is fooling thee!

And she has hair of a golden hue,

Take care!
And what she says, it is not true,

Beware! Beware!

Trust her not, She is fooling thee!

She has a bosom as white as snow,

Take care! She knows how much it is best to show,

Beware! Beware!

Trust her not, She is fooling thee!

She gives thee a garland woven fair,

Take care!
It is a fool's cap for thee to wear,

Beware! Beware!

Trust her not, She is fooling thee! LADY, AWAKEN.

BY EDMUND FLAGG.

Lady, awaken! The moonlight is glowing,

Beamy and bright, from the pure azure sky; Lady, awaken! The night-breeze is flowing,

Fitful and fresh, from its chambers on high. Lady, awaken! The night-bird is chanting,

Fondly and wildly, his soft serenade; Lady, awaken! Thy beauty is wanting

To bless this enchantment before it shall fade.

Lady, awaken! The night-dew is steeping,

Softly and sweetly, the meadows afar; Lady, awaken! The night-wave is sleeping,

Oh! waken and list to thy lover's guitar. Lady, awaken! The night-bird is chanting,

Fondly and wildly, his soft serenade; Lady, awaken! Thy beauty is wanting,

To bless this enchantment before it shall fade. HARK, BROTHERS, HARK.

BY J. H. WILLIS.

Haek, brothers, hark! the evening gun,
(Pull away steadily—all pull cheerily,)
Booms from the land at set of sun,

(Pull away readily—all pull merrily.)
Bend to your oars, for the night breeze will soon
Ripple the waves to the silvery moon;
So happy are we,
And fearless and free,
Pulling our boat o'er the moon-lit sea.

Pull away, boys, with main and might,

(All pull readily—pull, mates cheerily,) Looks that we love are here to-night,

(Pull, brothers, steadily—all pull merrily.)
Our boat, like a sea-bird, skims swiftly along,
To the dip of our oars and the chime of our song;
So hearty we be,
And jovial and free,
Pulling away o'er the dark blue sea.

Ladies at best hold landsmen cheap,
(Pull, lads, readily—all pull merrily;)

Beauty's smiles are for sons of the deep,
(Pull, boys, steadily—all pull cheerily;)
And beautiful eyes—let them say what they will-
Beam ever brightest on blue-jackets still;

So happy and free

And gleesome are we,
Pulling our boat o'er the tranquil sea.

Merrily, when we reach the shore,

(Pull away readily—all pull cheerily,)
A can we'll drain to the lads of the oar,
(Pull, boys, steadily—all pull merrily,
And frolic and fun shall be ours, till we
Are bounding again o'er the dark blue sea;
So happy are we,
And fearless and free,
Pulling our boat o'er the moon-lit sea.

VILLAGER'S WINTER EVENING SONG.

BY JAMES T. FIELDS.

Not a leaf on the tree—not a bud in the hollow, Where late swung the blue-bell and blossomed the rose; And hushed is the cry of the chirping young swallow, That perched on the hazel in twilight's dim close.

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