The Lost Girl

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Cambridge University Press, 1981 M09 30 - 426 páginas
The Cambridge edition of The Lost Girl uses the manuscript which D. H. Lawrence wrote in Sicily in 1920 to recapture his direct relationship with the text, and in particular to recover the characteristically fluent punctuation which the novel's original printers obscured or ignored. The edition prints all four of the passages which the publisher censored without Lawrence's full knowledge and the hero's name is correctly spelled for the first time in an English edition. The novel is set mainly in the Eastwood of Lawrence's youth, the full annotation identifies a great many real-life characters and settings. John Worthen's introduction gives an accurate account of The Lost Girl's development, composition and publication, and the influence upon the book of Lawrence's desire to write a commercially successful novel. The textual apparatus records all variant readings.

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Crítica de los usuarios  - villanova - LibraryThing

I couldn't get in in to this book, the first pages were very interesting but I cant say the same for the rest and the final. Leer comentario completo

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Crítica de los usuarios  - jrgoddess - LibraryThing

I really loved reading this book (on my Nook) with Norah Jones playing in the background. It's a really tragic and romantic love story without being too...gushy. I admit that the ending was abrupt, a ... Leer comentario completo

Contenido

THE LOST GIRL
1
ELSA CULVERWELL
341
EXPLANATORY NOTES
359
TEXTUAL APPARATUS
403
A note on pounds shillings and pence
426
Derechos de autor

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Acerca del autor (1981)

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda, who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.