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THE SEAMAN'S VICTORY :

OR, ADMIRAL KILLIGREW'S GLORIOUS CONQUEST OVER THE

FRENCA FLEET IN THE STREIGHTS, AS THEY WERE COMING FROM THOULON TOWARDS BREST; WITH THE MANNER OF TAKING THREE OF THEIR FRENCH MEN-OF-WAR, AND SINKING TWO MORE: ALTHOUGH THE FRENCH ADMIRAL VAINLY BOASTED HE WOULD RECOVER BREST OR PARADICE, YET HE SHAMEFULLY RUN FROM THE ENGLISH FLEET.

The following ballad is taken from the Bagford Collection, where it is directed to be sung

“ To the Tune of the Spinning-wheel.”

HERE's joyfull newes came late from sea,
'Tis of a gallant victory,
Which o'er the French we did obtain,
Upon the throbbing ocean main,
As soon as e'er they found our rage,
The rogues was glad to disengage.

The French fleet sailing from Thoulon,
As we by letters understand,
To join with those that lay at Brest,
As some of them have since confest;
But our brave fleet with them did meet,
And made the Frenchmen soon retreat.

Five ships, with others, did advance,
Being the very pride of France;
The Lewis, Dauphin, and the Sun,
With others which were forc'd to run,
As by this ditty you shall hear,
Brave English boys the coast did clear.

The French at first did brag and boast,
But we so wisely ruld the roast,
Under our Admiral Killegrew,
That we engag'd and beat them too:
Declaring that we did not fear
The haughty rage of proud Mounsieur.

Our admiral bore up amain,
Resolving that he would maintain
A sharp and bloody fight with those
Who dare King William's crown oppose;
Then broad-sides streight began to roar,
Which laid the French in reeking gore.

Right valiant seamen, fierce and bold,
Courageous noble hearts of gold,
All with a resolution bent,
Whole showers of shot to them they sent,
By which the French in hundreds fell,
Our guns did ring their passing-bell.

We pour'd our shot on ev'ry side,
'Tis bravely done, the captains cry'd,
Though sharp and bloody be the fray,
The French are beat, we have the day:
True English boys, 'twas bravely done,
See how the Frenchmen run, they run.

Now while we did maintain the fight,
Two French ships there we sunk down right,
And likewise have we taken three,
This crown'd our work with victory;
The noble valiant Killegrew,
After the rest do's still pursue.

The Frenchmen they did retreat,
They were a shatter'd torn fleet;
But if he shall them overtake,
A prize of all the rest he'll make;
Courageous boys are sail'd with him,
Who freely ventures life and limb.

Under the admiral's command,
For to defend the native land:
May Heaven prosper still and bless
Our valiant soldiers good success,
Then we hereafter

may

advance, To shake the very crown of France.

Printed for P. Brooks, by J. Deacon, J. Blare, and J. Back.

THE SEAMAN’S COMPASS :

OR,

A dainty new ditty composed and pen'd,
The deeds of brave seamen to praise and commend;
'Twas made by a maid that to Gravesend did pass.
Now mark, and you quickly shall hear how it was.
To the Tune of The tyrant hath stolen.

[From Bagford's Collection.]
As lately I travelled

towards Gravsend,

I heard a fair damsel

a seaman commend, And as in a tilt boat

we passed along, In praise of brave sea-men she sung

this new song: Come tradesmen or merchant,

whoever he be, There's none but a seaman

shall marry with me.

A sea-man in promise

is faithful and just, Honest in carriage,

and true to his trust: Kinde in behaviour

and constant in love, Is firm in affection

as the turtle dove, Valiant in action

in every degree, There's none, &c.

The sea-men adventures

their lives at the seas, Whilst land-men on shore

takes pleasure and ease : The sea-men at all times

their business must ply, In winter and summer,

in wet and in dry,

From toyl and pains-taking

they seldom are free, There's none but a seaman shall marry

with me.

Moreover I'de have you

for to understand That sea-men bring treasure

and profit to land, Above and beneath ground,

for wealth they have sought, And when they have found it

to England 'tis brought, With hazard of lives

by experience we see, There's none but a sea-man shall marry

with me.

Seamen from beyond seas

bring silver and gold, With pearls and rich jewels

most rare to behold, With silks and rich velvets

their credits to save, Or else you gay ladies

could not go so brave, This makes my heart merry,

as merry may be, There's none but a sea-maz

shall marry with me.

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