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tarianism which are so universally adopted at the present day, when applied to subjects of historical interest and curiosity, will readily seize hold of any apparent defect in the system, and will be used as an argument against the value of any collateral researches.

The Editor's thanks are preeminently due to Mr. E. F. Rimbault, the zealous Secretary of the Percy Society, who has supplied him with several of the ballads here printed, and other important communications. The Editor having been absent from London while this little volume was passing through the press, Mr. Rimbault has also kindly executed the task of correcting the proof-sheets, and collating the ballads with the original copies.

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28. A Song on the Victory over the Turks 29.

The Young Seaman's Misfortune 30. The Gallant Seaman's Return from the Indies 31. The Dangers of the Seas 32. The Mariner's Misfortune 33.

A pleasant new Song betwixt a Saylor and his Love 31. A Ballad by the late Lord Dorset, when at Sea 35. The Jolly Sailor's Resolution

With full double Cups 37. The Royal Triumph of Britain's Monarch 38. England's Triumph at Sea 39. Admiral Russel's Scowering the French Fleet 40. The Saylor's Song 41. Admiral Keppel Triumphant

The Sailor's Complaint 43. The Seaman's Happy Return 44. Admiral Hosier's Ghost 45. Admiral Vernon's Answer 46. Captain Death

The Death of Admiral Benbow 48. The Winning of Cales 49. The Shadwell Tar's Farewell 50. Neptune's Resignation 51. Hawke's Triumph over the mighty Brest Fleet 52. The Sailor's Resolution 53. The British Sailor's Loyal Toast 54.

A new Song, addressed to the Crew of the Prince Edward 55.

Sailor's Song during the War 56. The Sailor's Departure from England 57. The Song of Liberty

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EARLY NAVAL

VAL BALLADS.

THE EARLIEST SEA SONG.

The following curious ballad, which is by far the earliest yet discovered on this subject, was first pointed out by Mr. Wright, in a manuscript of the time of Henry VI. in the library of Trinity College, Cambridge, R. iii. 19. The key to the subject of it may be found in a singular letter printed in Sir Henry Ellis's Original Letters, Second Series, vol. i. p. 110, from which it appears

that ships were every year fitted out from different ports, with cargoes of pilgrims, to the shrine of St. James of Compostella ; for, strange as it may seem, pilgrims at this time were really, as Sir Henry Ellis observes, articles of exportation.

Men may leve all gamys,
That saylen to Seynt Jamys;
For many a man hit gramys;

When they begyn to sayle.

For when they have take the see,
At Sandwyche, or at Wynchylsee,
At Brystow, or where that hit bee,

Theyr herts begyn to fayle.

Anone the mastyr commaundeth fast
To hys shyp-men in all the hast,
To dresse hem sone about the mast,

Theyr takelyng to make.

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