Science and Religion, 400 B.C. to A.D. 1550: From Aristotle to Copernicus

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004 - 307 páginas
Many people believe that during the Middle Ages Christianity was actively hostile toward science (then known as natural philosophy) and impeded its progress. This comprehensive survey of science and religion during the period between the lives of Aristotle and Copernicus demonstrates how this was not the case. Medieval theologians were not hostile to learning natural philosophy, but embraced it. Had they had not done so, the science that developed during the Scientific Revolution would not--and could not--have occurred. Students and lay readers will learn how the roots of much of the scientific culture of today originated with the religious thinkers of the Middle Ages. Science and Religion, 400 B.C. to A.D. 1550 thoroughly covers the relationship between science and religion in the medieval period, and provides many resources for the student or lay reader: BL Discusses how the influx of Greek and Arabic science in the 12th and 13th centuries-- especially the works of Aristotle in logic and natural philosophy--dramatically changed how science was viewed in Western Europe. BL Demonstrates how medieval universities and their teachers disseminated a positive attitude toward rational inquiry and made it possible for Western Europe to become oriented toward science. BL Includes primary documents that allow the reader to see how important scholars of the period understood the relationship of science and religion. BL Provides an annotated bibliography of the most important works on science and religion in the Middle Ages, helping students to study the topic in more detail. BL
 

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Contenido

Introduction
1
A Time of Ignorance and Barbarism? Or a Period of Striking Innovation?
2
Religion and Science among the Greeks prior to the Emergence of Christianity?
13
The Propagation of Science
26
Brief Description of Chapters 28
30
Aristotle and the Beginnings of Two Thousand Years of Natural Philosophy
33
Works
34
Achievments
37
The Translations of Aristotles Books on Natural Philosophy
166
Universities in the Middle Ages
169
Types of Literature in Natural Philosophy
172
The Relations between Natural Philosophy and Theology in the Thirteenth Century
176
Is Theology a Science?
184
The Interrelations between Natural Philosophy and Theology in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries
191
The Influence of the Condemnation of 1277 on Natural Philosophy
195
The Impact of Religion on Natural Philosophy in the Middle Ages
202

Aristotels Cosmos and Natural Philosophy
41
The Scope of Natural Philosophy
47
Science and Natural Philosophy in the Roman Empire
57
The Emergence and Development of the Sciences in the Greek World
60
The Exact Sciences
67
Greek Science in the Roman Empire to the Sixth Century AD
83
The First Six Centuries of Christianity Christian Attitudes toward Greek Philosophy and Science
97
The Triumph of Christianity in the Roman World
101
Christianity and the Pagan Intellectual World
103
The Christian Understanding of the Creation of the World
114
The Emergence of a New Europe after the Barbarian Invasions
137
Western Europe at Its Nadir
145
The New Europe in the Twelfth Century
146
The Beginnings of the New Natural Philosophy
161
The Medieval Universities and the Impact of Aristotles Natural Philosophy
165
The Role of Natural Philosophy in Theology
206
The Significance and Meaning of the Interaction between Natural Philosophy and Theology
220
Relations between Science and Religion in the Byzantine Empire the World of Islam and the Latin West
225
Islam
230
The Latin West
243
Primary Sources
249
Giles of Rome Errores Philosophorum
254
Saint Bonaventure On the Eternity of the World De Aeternitate Mundi
257
Saint Thomas Aquinas On the Eternity of the World De Aeternitate Mundi
260
Albert of Saxony Questions on Aristotles On the Heavens
265
Nicole Oresme c AD 13201382 Le Livre du del et du monde
271
Annotated Bibliography
279
Index
295
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Página xiv - Extinguished theologians lie about the cradle of every science as the strangled snakes beside that of Hercules ; and history records that whenever science and orthodoxy have been fairly opposed, the latter has been forced to retire from the lists, bleeding and crushed, if not annihilated ; scotched, if not slain.

Acerca del autor (2004)

EDWARD GRANT is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History and Philosophy of Science at Indiana University, Bloomington. He is the author or editor of ten books, including The Foundations of Modern Science in the Middle Ages and God and Reason in the Middle Ages.

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