The Love of Books and Reading

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H. Holt, 1910 - 158 páginas

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Página 98 - Homer ruled as his demesne: Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: Then felt I like some watcher of the skies When a new planet swims into his ken; Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes He stared at the Pacific — and all his men Looked at each other with a wild surmise — Silent, upon a peak in Darien.
Página 21 - But the greatest error of all the rest, is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge : for men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity, and inquisitive appetite ; sometimes to entertain their minds with variety and delight ; sometimes for ornament and reputation ; and sometimes to enable them to victory of wit and contradiction ; and most times for lucre and profession...
Página 78 - With what joy I begin to read a poem, which I confide in as an inspiration ! And now my chains are to be broken ; I shall mount above these clouds and opaque airs in which I live — opaque, though they seem transparent — and from the heaven of truth I shall see and comprehend my relations.
Página 110 - What needs my Shakespeare for his honoured bones, The labour of an age in piled stones ? Or that his hallowed relics should be hid Under a star-ypointing pyramid ? Dear son of memory, great heir of fame, What need'st thou such weak witness of thy name ? Thou in our wonder and astonishment Hast built thyself a livelong monument.
Página 147 - Chi dietro a iura, e chi ad aforismi Sen giva, e chi seguendo sacerdozio, E chi regnar per forza o per sofismi, E chi rubare, e chi civil negozio, Chi, nel diletto della carne involto, S...
Página 13 - Just such is the feeling which a man of liberal education naturally entertains towards the great minds of former ages. The debt which he owes to them is incalculable. They have guided him to truth. They have filled his mind with noble and graceful images. They have stood by him in all vicissitudes, comforters in sorrow, nurses in sickness, companions in solitude.
Página 111 - Shakespeare, thy gift, I place before my sight; With awe, I ask his blessing ere I write ; With reverence look on his majestic face; Proud to be less, but of his godlike race.
Página 19 - Wise men have said are wearisome; who reads Incessantly, and to his reading brings not A spirit and judgment equal or superior (And what he brings, what needs he elsewhere seek) Uncertain and unsettled still remains, Deep versed in books and shallow in himself, Crude or intoxicate, collecting toys, And trifles for choice matters, worth a sponge; As children gathering pebbles on the shore.
Página 29 - ... idle, unwholesome, and (as I may term them) vermiculate questions, which have indeed a kind of quickness and life of spirit, but no soundness of matter or goodness of quality.

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