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mony to bear. So important is this kind of witnessing, that the word martyr, which means witness, has been appropriated in common lan- . guage to this kind of witnessing for Christ. Mr. Cecil relates that it was the example of his mother in enduring affliction with so much patience, that convinced him of the reality of religion, when he was a sceptical and godless youth. Lying one night in bed he reflected thus, as he records in his life : “I see two unquestionable facts. First, my mother is greatly afflicted in circumstances, body and mind, and yet I see that she cheerfully bears up under all, by the support she derives from constantly retiring to her closet and Bible. Secondly, that she has a secret spring of comfort of which I know nothing, while I, who give an unbounded loose to my appetites, and seek pleasure by every means, seldom or never find it. If however there is any such secret in religion, why may not I attain it as well as my mother? I will immediately seek it of God.” He did seek it, and found it in Jesus. . Thus it often is in cases that will never be known fully until“ the books" are opened. The humble, poor, and suffering christian, who bears in loneliness and poverty the sufferings of life, is testifying to all around the power of Christ, as really, and often as successfully, as Paul in the midst of Mars' Hill. If it was an impressive

witness for the power of religion that was given by the great English essayist, when he sent for his nephew to see in what peace a christian can die; it is a more impressive testimony that is given by some poor, lonely, neglected sufferer, who, without feeling that she is acting a part for the inspection of the world, yet in obscurity and desertion, shows to those who are permitted to watch her daily life, with what patience a christian can suffer. She may testify for Christ in her poverty and sickness, with more powerful effect than the most eloquent orator in the pulpit, for she is what he only describes. Hence in every department of life, in joy and sorrow, we are able to be witnesses for Cbrist, and testify by our conduct what the Lord has done for our souls; and as the circle of christian influence widens, this witness shall at last be carried to the uttermost part of the earth.

CHAPTER XIX.

THE ASCENSION,

Why the Ascension is so little alluded to in scripture. I. The fact

of the Ascension. (1) The time. (2) The place. (3) The attendant circumstances. II. The reasons for the Ascension. (1) The Priesthood of Christ. (2) The entrance into glory after suffering. (3) To display his Divine nature. (4) Connection with the descent of the Holy Ghost. (5) His intercession. (6) Preparing & place for us. (7) Our forerunner and example-His Ascension the picture and pledge of ours. (8) Sitting at the right hand of God The Pilgrim.

«Soft cloud, that while the breeze of May
Chants her glad matins in the leafy arch,

Draw'st thy bright veil across the heavenly way,
Meet pavement for an angel's glorious march;

My soul is envious of mine eye,
That it should soar and glide with thee so fast,

The while my grovelling thoughts half-buried lie,
Or lawless roam around this earthly waste.

Chains of my heart, avaunt I say,
I will arise, and in the strength of love,

Pursue the bright track ere it fade away,

My Saviour's pathway to his home above." "So then, after the Lord had spoken unto them, he was received up into heaven, and sat on the right hand of God.”—Mark xvi. 19.

“And he led them out as far as to Bethany; and he lifted up his hands, and blessed them. And it came to pass, while he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven. And they worshipped him, and returned to Jerusalem with great joy." Luke xxiv. 50--52.

"And when he had spoken these things, while they heheld, he was taken up; and a cloud received him out of their sight. And while they looked steadfastly toward heaven, as he went up, behold, two men stood by them in white apparel ; which also said, Ye men of Galilee, wby stand ye gazing up into heaven? This same Jesus which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come in like manner as ye have seen him go into heaven. Then returned they unto Jerusalem from the mount called Olivet, which is from Jerusalem a sabbath-day's journey."-Acts i. 9--12.

It is a little remarkable, that an event which strikes us so forcibly as the Ascension, should not have occupied a larger space in the sacred records. To us the Ascension is even a more wonderful event than the Resurrection, and we naturally crave a full account of it, to satisfy our curiosity. But the sacred writers never attempt to satisfy mere curiosity, or the demands of imagination. Their silence and reserve are often more wonderful, and more indicative of divine guidance, than their revelations. The Ascension is regarded by them as so closely linked with the Resurrection, so necessarily following it, and so blended with it in significance, that they dwell much more on the latter than on the former. Hence, whilst all the gospels record the Resurrection, but two of them record the Ascension. Mark (xvi. 19) gives a very brief record of it: “So then, after the Lord had spoken unto them, he was received up into heaven, and sat on the right hand of God.” Luke, writing at probably a later date, when the importance of the event was more fully apprehended, gives us a fuller account of it. In his gospel (xxiv. 50–52) he states : “ And be led them out as far as to Bethany, and he lifted up his hands and blessed them. And it came to pass, while he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven. And they worshipped him, and returned to Jerusalem with great joy." In the Acts, he gives another account of it-(i. 9-12): “And when he had spoken these things, while they beheld, he was taken up, and a cloud received him out of their sight. And while they looked steadfastly toward heaven, as he went up, behold two men stood by them in white apparel, which also said, Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up into leaven? This same Jesus which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come in like manner as ye have seen him go into heaven. Then returned they unto Jerusalem, from the mount called Olivet, which is from Jerusalem a Sabbathday's journey.” It is alluded to by Paul in several of his larger Epistles; (Eph. iv. 8-10; Heb. x. 12 ;) by Peter twice in his first Epistle; (1 Pet. i. 21 ; iii. 22 ;) and is implied in the visions of the Apocalypse. Rev. ii. 8, &c.

Hence, it is not from any want of evidence as to the fact that it is not more frequently alluded to; but because it is so closely connected with the Resurrection as to stand or fall with it; and because the great contest was necessarily in regard

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