The Planter's Guide: Or, A Practical Essay on the Best Method of Giving Immediate Effect to Wood, by the Removal of Large Trees and Underwood; Being an Attempt to Place the Art, and that of Geneneral Arboriculture, on Fixed and Phytological Principles; Interspersed with Observations on General Planting, and the Improvement of Real Landscape. Originally Intended for the Climate of Scotland

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G. Thorburn and sons, 1832 - 422 páginas
 

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Página xii - PLAIN COOKERY, — detailing many particulars and precautions, which may at first appear frivolous — but which experience will prove to be essential — to teach a...
Página 103 - Stem, in contradistinction to others in the interior of woods, are obviously intended to give to the former greater strength to resist the winds, and a shorter lever to act upon the roots. Secondly, their larger heads, with spreading Branches, in consequence of the free access of light, are...
Página 317 - But rather to tell how, if art could tell, How from that sapphire fount the crisped brooks Rolling on orient pearl and sands of gold, With mazy error under pendent shades...
Página 261 - During the putrefaction of urine the greatest part of the soluble animal matter that it contains is destroyed, it should consequently be used as fresh as possible ; but if not mixed with solid matter, it should be diluted with water, as when pure it contains too large a...
Página 163 - The confinement of the air occasions decomposition, by means of the moisture in the earthy portions. Ammonia is formed, by the union of the hydrogen of the water, with the nitrogen of the atmosphere, and nitre, by the union of oxygen and nitrogen. The oxygen likewise probably unites with the carbon contained in the Soil, and forms carbonic acid gas, and carburetted hydrogen.
Página 415 - ... setting the one on the right hand and the other on the left — and to distinguish and gather out the tares from amongst the wheat. Many of the servants of the owner of the...
Página 127 - Their development is most luxuriant in ground that is neither too loose nor too dense. In stiff and poor soils they are spare and scraggy, whereas in such as are at once deep and loose, the minutest fibres both expand and elongate with facility, and render the mouths that search for food to the plant almost...
Página 118 - ... through the vessels of the root, to the trunk. In its ascent, it rises only through the wood and the alburnum, in tubes of various sizes, and is prepared or elaborated by the leaves. That process, according to some, is effected by means of an alternate contraction and dilatation of the...
Página 51 - ... formed combinations, which were extremely pleasing. The copse or underwood, which covers an Island in the Lake, and two Promontories, as also an adjoining bank that terminates the distance, was seen coming down nearly to the water's edge. What was the most important of all, both Trees and underwood had obtained a full and deep-coloured leaf, and health and vigour were restored to them. In a word, the whole appeared like a spot at least forty years planted.
Página 127 - Their developement is most luxuriant in ground, that is neither too loose, nor too dense. In stiff and poor soils, they are spare and scraggy ; whereas, in such as are at once deep and loose, the minutest Fibres both expand and elongate with facility...

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