Silver Mines and Incidents of Travel: Letters and Notes on Sea and Land

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T. Wilson, printer, 1893 - 314 páginas

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Página 223 - When the devil was sick, the devil a monk would be, When the devil was well, the devil a monk was he.
Página 293 - Lo, the poor Indian! whose untutor'd mind Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind; His soul, proud science never taught to stray Far as the solar walk, or milky way...
Página 59 - He that is surety for a stranger shall smart for it: and he that hateth suretyship is sure.
Página 177 - ... intention to injure us. We ought rather to meet the anticipated danger by a diligent cultivation, and prudent management, of our own resources. We ought to conciliate the respect and good will of other nations, and secure their assistance in case of need, by the benevolence and justice of our conduct. War is not to be resorted to without absolute necessity, nor unless peace would be more dangerous, and more miserable, than war itself.
Página 149 - ... heats it again, and but for your awnings, and the little air put in circulation by the continual flapping of the ship's sails, it would be almost insufferable. No person who has not crossed this region can form an adequate idea of its unpleasant effects.
Página 149 - ... of the ship's sails, it would be almost insufferable. No person who has not crossed this region can form an adequate idea of its unpleasant effects. You feel a degree of lassitude unconquerable, which not even the sea-bathing, which everywhere else proves so salutary and renovating, can dispel. Except when in actual danger of shipwreck, I never spent twelve more disagreeable days in the professional part of my life, than in these calm latitudes.
Página 177 - ... individual member of a state, is a just cause of war, if redress be refused, but a nation is not bound to go to war on so slight a foundation ; for it may of itself grant indemnity to the injured party, and if this cannot be done, yet the good of the whole is to be preferred to the welfare of a part.b Every milder method of redress is to be tried, before the nation makes an appeal to arms ; and this is the sage and moral precept of the writers on natural law.
Página 149 - ... flapping of the ship's sails, it would be almost insufferable. No person who has not crossed this region can form an adequate idea of its unpleasant effects. You feel a degree of lassitude unconquerable, which not even the sea-bathing, which every where else proves so salutary and renovating, can dispel.
Página 72 - I am Saint Mark, the patron of Venice ! I learned to-night that the Devils, assembled in council at Lido, in the Jews...

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