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Alabama...
Arkansas
California..
Colorado..
Connecticut.
Delaware
Florida
Georgia...
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa....
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana.
Maine
Maryland.
Massachusetts.
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri.
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey.
New York
North Carolina
Ohio....
Oregon

250

580 4, 105

536 2, 274

92

60 312

293
1, 479
1,082

950
146

688 1, 190 6, 465 1, 618 3, 357

346

133
108

TABLE 30.-Statistical summary of students in institutions for superior instruction, Sc.

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Table 32 presents the statistics of 204 institutions reporting under the head of superior instruction for women. These had 2,123 instructors and 27,143 stndeuts distributed as follows so far as known : Preparatory 6,68€, regular 13,206, normal course 107, special 1,254, advanced 164.

By reference to the column showing productive funds it will be noticed that 13 of the institntions report none and 161 make no report under that head. Of the remainder, 19 report productive funds yielding incomes less than $2,000, 6 realize incomes from their productive funds ranging from $2,000 to $5,000, 1 an income of $8,945, and 4 incomes as follows: Mt. Holyoke, $11,000; Wellesley College, $23,371; Buffalo Female Academy, $24,000; Friends College, Bryn Mawr, $40,000.

The lack of endowments, whicli is a serious draw back to this class of schools, seems the more surprising when it is remembered that the patrons of the schools are found largely among the wealthier classes. The facts suggest a want of appreciation on their part of the essentials of a vigorous educational work, which the schools themselves might possibly correct by well-organized efforts. It is noticeable that in the distribution of benefactions for the year, as shown in Table 84, page 673, the class of schools under consideration received only $266,285, or a little niore than 4 per cent. of the total reported. Of this amount $124,072 were donated to 4 institutions in Massachusetts, and $100,000 to a college in Ohio, leaving $42,213 to be distributed among the rest of the schools.

About two-thirds of the institutions tabulated are authorized by law to confer degrees; these offer a curriculum closely resembling the ordinary college course ; greater option, however, seems to be allowed than in the colleges for men, and, as a rule, inodern languages engage more attention than the classics. On the whole the experience of these schools seems to indicate that identity of training for the two sexes is not as yet generally demanded in the United States. This fact becomes even more evident upon an examination of the courses of study usually followed by the women students in co-education colleges. There are, of course, notable exceptions to this general tendency. Thus among the superior institutions for women are found colleges like Smith, Wellesley, and Bryn Mawr, where the customary college standards are maintained, and in the co-education colleges women are found rivalling men in the successful pursuit of the severest studies. With respect, however, to much of the work represented in the table before us, the term "superior” inust be taken in a somewhat different sense from the same term as applied to the intellectual discipline and culture afforded in the leading colleges for men. The recognition of this difference makes it easy to understand why women, who are conscious of superior intellectual powers, or who foresee the need of an equipment for intellectual work which will en

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