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The Little Child's Purt's Corner.

ON THE SEASONS.

BY MARY HOWITT.
The earth is thine, and it thou keepest,
That man may labour not in vain;

Thou giv'st the grass, the grain, the tree,

Seed-time and harvest come from thee,
The early and the latter rain.
The earth is thine,—the summer earth,
Fresh with the dews, with sunshine bright;

With golden clouds in evening hours,

With singing birds and balmy flowers,
Creatures of beauty and delight.
The earth is thine,--when days are dim,
And leafless stands the stately tree;

When from the north the fierce winds blow,

When falleth fast, the mantling snow,-.
The earth pertaineth still to thee !
The earth is thine,—thy creature, man!
Thine are all worlds, all suns that shine ;

Darkness and light, and life and death,

Whate'er all space inhabiteth,-
Creator! Father! all are thine!

THE BOW OF PROMISE.

BY CHARLES MACKAY, LL.D. When skies are dark, and tempests blow,

And clouds discharge their rain,
Appears in heaven the radient bow,

And all is bright again.
Type of the promise kindly given

To man in days of yore,
That the incessant ire of Heaven

Should drown the world no more.

So in the heart where sorrow dwells,

And all is dark with care,
One cheering beam the gloom dispels,

And keeps away despair.
When once that hallow'd light appears

Athwart the clouds of woe,
A glory shines in human tears

And gilds them as they flow.

Like to the rainbow in the sky,

When storms their fury dart. The other bow appears on high,

When storms are in the heart :“ Trust in the promises of God,”

It smiles amid the gloom, Lightens affliction's heaviest rod,

And cheers the darkest doom.

THE EAST-INDIAMAN.

Look at this gallant vessel, now,

With all her sails unfurled ;
Her freight is tea, from China sent

To all parts of the world,

Boldly she sails around the globe

Her highway is the sea;
Before her prow the sparkling waves

Are dashed right gallantly.

Now she is homeward bound, her crew

Upon the deck all stand; They think of loved ones,-friends, --of home,

Of England's happy land.

Above them flies the British flag,

The waves are green below,
Speed on, brave ship, with swelling sails-

How steadily you go.

Fairy Tale, for Children. THE MERMAID AND THE KIND FISHERMAN.

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SOMUTDOIT

US ILDERMEKEE! Kildermekée !” cried a plain

tive frightened voice, and up went a spray of the sea, and presently appeared a female figure, with yellow hair and an ivory comb.

“Oh dear,” said a desponding fisherman, “could I have seen a fish, instead of a lady, it would have

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fed my family; what shall I do! oh, what shall I do! a foreign lady and no food; an extra mouth, and no victuals.”

“ Kildermekée !” cried the yellow-haired lady, louder than before.

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“ Kildermekée, indeed,” said the fisherman; “its likely enough I am to be killed, catching a lady; were I a wrecker, instead of a poor honest fisherman, Kildermekée might feed the fishes; howsomever, as I know what it is to have too much of the water, myself, I'll be charitable.

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