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THE

• MORAL AND INTELLECTUAL

SCHOOL BOOK;

CONTAINING

INSTRUCTIONS FOR READING AND SPEAKING,
LESSONS ON RELIGION, MORALITY, SCIENCE, AND PHILOSOPHY,

RHETORIC AND ORATORY,

WITH

COPIOUS EXTRACTS FROM THE MODERN POETS,

AND

REMARKS ON THEIR GENIUS AND WRITINGS.

BY WILLIAM MARTIN,

EDITOR OF THE “EDUCATIONAL MAGAZINE," AUTHOR OF "THE

CHRISTIAN LACON," ETC. ETC.

FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS.

LONDON:
DARTON AND CLARK, HOLBORN HILL.

16 JAN 1954 KIBRARY PREFACE.

The object of this book is the development of the religious sentiments, and the intellectual faculties, in a regular and systematic manner ; and the lessons introduced are, therefore, such as exhibit the first and great principles of morality on the one hand, and the leading and incontrovertible facts of science, on the other ; and the teacher may be assured, that the utmost care has been taken in the selection, that nothing should be introduced but what is calculated to exalt the feelings, strengthen the judgment, improve the taste, and purify the heart The religious and moral lessons, comprehend the fundamental ttuths and principles of Christianity and Christian morality, while those of a scientific character, refer to the most important philosophical data, or bring before the mind the striking phenomena of nature, and the operation of the natural laws; and as science has its own peculiar language and phraseology, these lessons afford, at the same time, exercises for the development of language, and the faculty of speech. The extracts referring to the softer affections, under the head of, “ Descriptive and Sentimental Lessons,” have been selected with a view to correct false sentimentality, and to substitute for the morbid sensiblity, too common in young minds of modern growth, a natural tone of healthy and genuine feeling. One new and important feature in this work is, the introduction of the “ Modern Poets," with remarks on their genius, and extracts from their writings; the object of which is to make the pupil acquainted with the genius and character of those likely to have a great and lasting influence upon his mind. In the "somewhat critical” remarks prefixed to these extracts, the writer has felt the extreme delicacy of the task, but he trusts that he has fulfilled it at least honestly. He has spoken boldly, and according to the best of his judgment, and he hopes has neither been deficient in courtesy to the living, or in charity to the dead.

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